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Author Topic: New member - Hello  (Read 3128 times)

tpbeebejr

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New member - Hello
« on: February 24, 2014, 01:28:39 PM »
I am a new member from the Kennett Square area of PA (southeast corner of PA). After reading Wheat Belly and thinking about things, I decided to try to go wheat-free for a while as an experiment. My father was diagnosed with celiac disease about 18 years ago, and he has been scrupulous about avoiding gluten. He is now doing very well and has become a self-taught expert in avoiding wheat. Because I am around him a lot, in restaurants and in the home, I have also learned a great deal about avoiding wheat.

Unlike my father, where his goal is to avoid gluten, I do not have celiac disease (I had the antibody test done), so I don't really care about gluten per se.  I am basically trying to lose some of the weight around my middle for general health reasons, and because I noticed a very slow but significant upward trend in my weight for the last 5 years (about 2 or 3 pounds per year). Being a scientist, I have carefully documented and plotted my weight, % body fat, and BMI on a daily basis for several years now, and long before I decided to go on a wheat-free diet. I use one of those electronic scales that measures body fat by impedance.

I have been wheat-free now for about 5 weeks.  I started at about 175 pounds, 19.2% body fat, BMI 24.8 (I am 5 feet, 10.5 inches tall, and 53 years old). Since quitting wheat I have steadily (almost linearly) dropped to 167 pounds, 16.4% body fat, BMI 23.6. I think I am almost at my ideal weight, but I intend to continue to be wheat-free forever. I am hoping to learn from others on this forum, and get the kind of support that makes being wheat-free easier.  Thanks!


Tom
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 04:05:17 PM by Rita »
Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

Rita

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 04:07:32 PM »
Welcome to the forum Tom.  And congrats on getting to your ideal weight!   Did you find that even though you are not celiac, that you started feeling better in general without wheat?

Suzhookem

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 07:23:08 PM »
Welcome to the forum Tom!  Glad to have you. You find all kinds of people here. Wonderful people that are so helpful. I look forward to your posts.

tpbeebejr

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2014, 08:30:03 AM »
Did you find that even though you are not celiac, that you started feeling better in general without wheat?
Yes, except for the headaches. I seem to have a perpetual headache that is just beginning to subside. But I don't feel hungry all the time, and I seem to have more energy, although this could just be my imagination.
Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2014, 09:03:22 AM »
Tom,


Try to drink more water!  You should be drinking at least half your body weight in ounces.  This helps your body remove the toxins.  Next, take the probiotics to help your intestines regain the proper flora.  Many of the supplements Dr. Davis recommends are helpful too.  Everyone has different withdrawal symptoms.  Some have none at all.

Jan in Key West

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 09:23:54 AM »
Welcome Tom,
As a scientist, you'll be a great asset to the forum. Looks like you're making wonderful progress and I look forward to your input.

tpbeebejr

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 09:05:47 PM »
Thanks, Barbara. I'll try the probiotics. As for the water, I weigh about 165 lbs., so 165/2 = 82 ounces of water. I carbonate my own water and I drink a 2-liter bottle every night (about 68 ounces). Add that to what I drink during the day and I think I am drinking enough water. Thanks for the advice on the probiotics.
Tom

Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

tpbeebejr

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 09:33:26 PM »

As a scientist, you'll be a great asset to the forum.
Jan, I am not so sure about how scientists are viewed in this forum. I see a lot of scientist bashing here, especially in the discussions on GMO topics. Perhaps some blame is warranted, I'm sure, but not as a general general rule like scientist = bad.


I am a chemistry professor, so I teach students and direct scientific research carried out by students and funded by the federal government. My research specialties are surface chemistry and biomaterials. We are working on the development of an understanding for what it will take to promote the re-growth of neurons. It is basic research, so we aren't implanting anything in anybody yet. But we hope to contribute to the development of an implantable biomaterial bridge that someday (more than 10 years away in all likelihood) allows nerves to re-connect after a spinal cord injury, or cells in the brain to regrow or heal after damage from neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimers, Parkinson's, MS, ALS, and others.


The GMO problem is an interesting moral issue for me to ponder as a scientist. If we assume that all GMO = bad (for the sake of argument here), then I wonder how much the bench-level scientists are to blame. I think that decisions about what directions a large agribusiness company will go in are made by high-level lawyers and business gurus, not the scientists. Don't get me wrong: scientists can't use the same lame arguments that the Nazi death-camp functionaries used during the Nuremburg trials after WW-II. But I would guess that bench-level scientists often don't even know how their small piece of the work fits into the whole big puzzle that might be the development of a new GMO strain of sweet corn, for example.
Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2014, 05:00:51 AM »
> If we assume that all GMO = bad (for the sake of argument here), ...

I don't. The technology is not the problem. We may well need it at some point. The problems are the present applications of it.

The problems with "GMO: are:
  • lack of long-term food safety testing (which would need to be done on a spectrum of diet types, as the SAD is overloaded with confounding factors)
  • the specific genes selected for current GMO products (e.g. Bt) and/or the side effects of the genes selected (e.g. glyphosate uptake)
  • lack of disclosure, indeed, an aggressive unwillingness to let the consumer be fully informed, which extends to the very definition of "GMO", which the industry tries to restrict to mean explicit gene insertion - radio-mutagenesis & chemo-mutagenesis aren't admitted to be GMO, but being recklessly random gene insertion, they are "gmo" in my book.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2014, 05:58:42 AM »
Tom,

Many people posting here are just astounded and angry that they have wound up with medical conditions that could have been avoided or at least less serious than they are if they had known about what grains and sugars were doing to their health.  Part of the anger is at themselves for buying into the advertising.  Part of the anger is at the government and other regulatory/professional organizations that keeps their dietetic and nutritional guidelines within the recommendations of the very same corporations who profit from using their products.  Part of the anger is at the medical community who doesn't have a clue about helping you get well, preferring to manage your problem with endless drugs, poisons, test and surgeries.

Our health issues didn't happen overnight.  The very same people/organizations we trusted have failed us miserably.
Most of us have eaten reasonably healthy diets only to find that nearly every supermarket food is chock full of unhealthy additives, rendering the item as something to avoid eating.  We are calling this "dirty" food.  Following the suggested dietary guidelines only made our problems worse.   Our search for "clean" food has been rather daunting since nearly everything in our huge supermarkets contains wheat or sugar or pesticides or is processed to provide extended shelf life rather than nutrition. 

As this way of eating continues to grow, clean foods are thankfully becoming increasingly available at a reasonable cost.  And surprise, surprise our health issues slowly diminish the longer we eat this way.  All the human misery need not have happened in the first place.  It is not the bench-level scientists that caused the problems.  As you stated, it is the higher level corporate executives who utilized the information to increase profitability without a care as to impact on health. 
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 06:15:25 AM by Barbara from New Jersey »

Jan in Key West

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 06:10:29 AM »
Tom,
It may not be "scientist bashing'....as much as a cynicism towards those in power positions who abuse, deceive and fraudulently manipulate science for financial and authoritative control.....at least that's my view. By all means, we desperately need science and technology, (now more than ever) when it comes to transitioning to a healthier dietary strategy (among other things) so in a nutshell, we need people like you, (scientific, pragmatic, ethical and wise) to reach this objective.


On the GMO front, I agree with Boundless's remarks and am concentrating my efforts (financial and otherwise) toward initiatives which 'identify' GMO ingredients......that's an essential first step and one in which I hope I can make a difference.


Your research regarding nerve regeneration sounds fascinating , noble and worthy. P.S.....As a chemist and educator, if you run across a reputable textbook on food chemistry, would you mind passing it along? I'm embarking on a fermenting journey and am interested in identifying the hierarchy of bacteria in the process.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 06:24:55 AM by Jan in Key West »

tpbeebejr

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2014, 01:49:32 PM »
>>   "...radio-mutagenesis & chemo-mutagenesis..." <<

Thanks for your thoughts, Boundless. I agree with all three of your bullet points. But I am not familiar with the intentional practice of creating random gene mutations by energy and chemicals. Do you have some sources that you can point me to for my edification? On its face, this sounds like a stupid way to effect a desired change at the gene level.
Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

tpbeebejr

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2014, 02:00:05 PM »
P.S.....As a chemist and educator, if you run across a reputable textbook on food chemistry, would you mind passing it along? I'm embarking on a fermenting journey and am interested in identifying the hierarchy of bacteria in the process.


Thanks for your comments, Jan, I will see what I can find about the chemistry of fermentation and the organisms involved. I haven't looked, but since there has been such an explosion in home brewing over the last decade, perhaps there are several good books out there that even focus on the organisms involved.
Thanks,
Tom (tpbeebejr)
Wheat-free since 15 Jan 2014

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Dr. Victor Frankenstein was a naive amateur
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2014, 07:04:55 AM »
> ... I am not familiar with the intentional practice of creating
> random gene mutations by energy and chemicals. Do you
> have some sources that you can point me to for my edification?


I first learned of it from WORSE than Genetic Modification on WBB.

> On its face, this sounds like a stupid way to effect a
> desired change at the gene level.


I suspect that prior to gene splicing, it was all that was available to materially accelerate the selective breeding process.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2014, 10:48:42 AM »
GMO News:
U.S. GMO crops show mix of benefits, concerns - USDA report

The full report is linked from:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err-economic-research-report/err162.aspx

Just skimming it, some take-aways not in the Reuters summary:
  • flax, squash, tomato and some fruit may be GMO (uh oh)
  • in case smoking wasn't killing you fast enough, GMO tobacco is being developed
  • Monsanto has more authorized permits & notifications than all other FrankenFirms combined
  • the main reason farmers chose GMO seeds is increased yield (which the report says they may not be actually getting, and may lose due to emerging resistant pests/weeds)

Wheat Free Forum

Re: New member - Hello
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2014, 10:48:42 AM »

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