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Author Topic: Flaxseed  (Read 5728 times)

Jan in Key West

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Flaxseed
« on: March 12, 2014, 09:09:59 AM »
A post appeared on the WBB regarding flaxseed and the possibility that it may contribute to several health concerns/issues. I found some additional articles that reinforced using caution when consuming flaxseed, as well as the oil. Knowing that flax is a common denominator in the WB woe, I thought it was worth having the discussion.


http://carbwars.blogspot.com/2013/02/wheat-belly-cookbook-review-is-flax-new_3.html

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 10:04:10 AM »
Weston A Price also has a good article on it:  http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/flaxseed-and-oil-for-omega-3

From what I'm learning in school, many people are overdoing the omega 3 intake.  That's in large part because our society consumes so much omega 6, and we have to keep that in balance or we have inflammation.

But the fact is, we only need a little bit of omega 6 and 3 in our diet.  2-5% max.    Our fats should mainly be saturated and monounsaturated fats.    And keep in mind that eggs already have omega 3 in the yolk, with pastured eggs having even more.

And because polyunsaturated fats ( the omegas ), are so unstable, it will cause oxidation very quickly, which is a huge health concern.   And just the process alone of getting a refined oil generally will cause oxidation (rancidity), which is then covered up by bleaching and deodorizing.   
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 10:08:34 AM by Rita »

Jan in Key West

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2014, 11:01:06 AM »
And in addition, whether the high level of estrogen mimicking properties of the flaxseeds should be avoided by those with sensitive hormonal conditions such as poly cystic ovary syndrome, certain cancers, as well as those with hypothyroid issues.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2014, 11:41:58 AM »
MDA: Mark Sisson on flax a few years ago

"As Apples know, Iíve been a flax supporter. Lately, Iíve been mulling that position."

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2014, 11:48:49 AM »
HmmÖ.   Here's something the whfoods.com website had to say about it:


Quote
We've seen mixed findings in the area of post-menopausal benefits (such as reduction of hot flashes) and flaxseed intake, with some studies showing significant benefits and other studies showing a lack of significant benefits. However, there continues to be strong interest in flaxseeds and their components (including enterolactone and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside) as potential aids during management of perimenopausal and postmenopausal symptoms as well as during hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

This area of flaxseed research is admittedly complex. For example, enterolactone made from flaxseed lignans has been shown to be an estrogen agonist (promoting estrogen production, through increased formation of transcription factors like ER-alpha and ER-beta), as well as an estrogen antagonist (working against estrogen production, through inhibition of enzymes like estrogen synthetase). It's also known to lower the activity of 5-alpha-reductase (an enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone) and 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (an enzyme that converts estrone into estradiol). Given this complicated set of circumstances that may vary from one woman to another, it may turn out that flaxseed intake is simply better at lessening menopausal symptoms in some women, and not as good at lessening symptoms in others.

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2014, 11:52:58 AM »
Here's a study on PCOS-  improves PCOS symptoms:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2752973/




Here's a study on breast cancer - reduces breast cancer risk:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23354422
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 11:56:46 AM by Rita »

Jan in Key West

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2014, 04:36:14 AM »
Lots of conflicting information regarding flaxseed.....for the time being, I'm putting it on our 'limited' list, even though we already use it sparingly. It's interesting that the current protocol for breast cancer survivors (as well as a prophylactic for those with benign growths) is to take tamoxifen, which is an estrogen lowering drug.

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2014, 06:10:54 AM »
My friend was on tamoxifen from her breast cancer, and it caused uterine cancer.  I guess that's a risk factor with tamoxifen.

Jan in Key West

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2014, 06:23:00 AM »
My husband's daughter-in-law had a small calcification removed and she was put on tamoxifen as a prophylactic......given what I've read about it,  I'm not sure I would have elected to take it.

Loanne

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2014, 11:34:39 AM »
I haven't read all the links sent on this subject yet, but am feeling kind of down because now we have to also limit flaxseed....??!!  I did have breast cancer and took tamoxifen for a short time.  I also take an omega supplement, simply because Dr. D suggested it.  So...no more flaxseed or omega supplements, is that it?  :-\

Jan in Key West

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2014, 12:31:30 PM »
I have no idea.....and am as confused as anyone! After seeing the post regarding flaxseed on WBB, I did a few searches and found conflicting articles/studies so thought it worth exploring here. For the time being, I'm erring on the side of caution but I never did think eating vast quantities of nuts/seeds and their flours was necessarily a healthy thing. The jury is still out....my hope is that Dr. D responds.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 12:43:06 PM by Jan in Key West »

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2014, 01:45:09 PM »
I really don't think that we should be getting ourselves worked up about flaxseed.  Most people ingest only small amounts on a daily basis, as an ingredient in a baked good.  As i remember, there was some concern about almond flour too.  Dr. Davis has discussed some of  the negatives in nuts and seeds and, if I am remembering correctly, he stated "you have to pick your battles", further concluding that while caution is wise, making your diet so restrictive that you don't want to keep on it, is foolish. 


Most people are deficient in omega 3's and do need to supplement until you really can figure out if you are consistently eating enough to replenish your system and have given your body a chance to actually properly utilize it.  Remember, the fish we eat is probably farm raised and deficient in 3's compared to the amount in wild caught.  Grass fed diary and meats have much better ratio's and we are slowly adapting to this.  The suggestions of not using the seed and vegetable oils because of their high omega 6 content is probably very important as well.  Not eating the processed and prepared foods also means we aren't eating much in the way of omega 6's so the ratio to 3's is much better. 


In conclusion, I just wouldn't be concerned unless I was using the seed and oil at over a 1/2 cup amount consistently every day.  In a varied diet, that is pretty difficult to do.  Of course, if you have an estrogen sensitive disease or have had cancer, you would be strictly monitoring your intake.

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2014, 01:55:59 PM »
This is my opinion - others may completely disagree with me here.   I personally would not use flaxseed oil and I would not take an omega-3 supplement.  If I did use flaxseed oil, I would never cook or bake with it.  I'd just use it in dressings.  But if I make a dressing, I'd still rather use olive oil or avocado oil for that.  The PUFA's are very prone to oxidation (even in our own body). They are essential, but we only need a very small amount of PUFA's.  PUFA's are already naturally in our paleolithic diet.   Most people however, are on the Standard American Diet, and with that, I can see where you would need to supplement, because the omega 6 is very high in the standard american diet. In fact, it's at toxic levels.  So we need omega 3 to lower the toxicity.  It's important to keep the ratios between omega 6 and 3 balanced.  This is why I think there is so much hype when it comes to omega 3's lowering inflammation.   It's relative.   


But if you are eating pastured eggs, meat and fish, you're already getting your omega 3 and 6 in, so in my mind, there is no reason to supplement.  And if you've ditched the bad oils and gotten rid of processed foods, you've gotten rid of most of your toxic levels of omega 6.   


Here's another article on flaxseed oil if you do decide to use it:
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=316

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2014, 02:09:34 PM »
I should also mention that flaxseed is the plant form of Omega 3 Ö   the ALA form.   The body still needs to convert that to EPA or DHA.  Conversion from ALA to EPA or DHA is not very efficient, and generally has a conversion rate of 1-9%.   So although flax is high in omega 3, it still takes a lot of flax to convert it to a usable amount.

Loanne

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2014, 02:41:58 PM »
Barbara & Rita, thanks very much for helping to clear up this for me.  For some unknown reason, I panicked when I read that, not sure why.  I don't eat much flaxseed and it's usually in the form of meal which I use in bread products, but don't make bread things that often.  I don't eat fast food, nothing processed anymore, eat eggs often, beef and fish are pastured, and eggs are from cage-free hens.  I may quit taking the omega supplement, however, based on your message.  I'm almost out of the one bottle I purchased, so I just won't "renew." 

I try very hard to keep all of this simple.  Complication does not work well with me.  I very much appreciate your kind comments, since I am, too, cognizant of foods that could start the cancer rolling again.  Sugar seemed to be a big one, and that's been eliminated for over a year now, too. Deep breaths...Ohm-m-m...  :)

Rita

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2014, 03:07:28 PM »
lol -


You sound like you've got a good healthy diet going on Loanne.  :)   

BarbinNC

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Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2015, 05:56:46 AM »
I was going to post a question regarding flax seed this morning, and found this.  I've been wondering if it would be beneficial for a menopausal woman to consume, to the estrogenic effect, however after reading this the posts here I might not want to do that.  For baking they really are helpful, but I've been using Chia seeds and psyllium powder with good results lately, instead, because daughter and grandson (whom I bake wheat free for mainly) really don't need this added estrogen problem. 


Still wondering if it could replace HRT for us ladies in the post menopause phase of life Ö. ?

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Flaxseed
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2015, 05:56:46 AM »

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