This forum is created by people who follow the Wheat Belly Diet, as a place to communicate with each other about various topics. Please note that this site is a user created site, and not one of Dr. Davis' sites.

Author Topic: Food Politics  (Read 77485 times)

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Food Politics
« on: May 03, 2013, 10:11:00 AM »
I don't know why I'm suddenly so interested in food politics, but I am.   I feel like I've been duped believing low fat high carb was the way to eat, that 'whole grains' were good for you, etc.  It's really opened my eyes.


How is it that we were all made to believe that canola oil was good for us?  How is it that ketchup is considered a vegetable is school lunches?  How is it that when a company makes something low fat, they load it with sugar instead (ie-skim milk ) and that nutritionists then claim that is healthier?   How is it that wheat has become so genetically modified and that although the industry knows how bad it is for us, that they focus on 'get your whole grains in' and dietitians/nutritionists/doctors follow suit?  Why does the American Heart Association not change their dietary recommendations after studies and studies show that their recommendations are false.  ( i.e They still say coconut oil and eggs are bad ).   Why is it that Oprah can't say anything bad about the meat industry?  Why is it illegal for people to discuss anything that happens in meat packing plants?   Why is it that companies that genetically modify foods like Monsanto get a line item hidden in a bill that passes in congress that allows them not to be sued even if they know the genetically modified organism that is in our food is dangerous?


And, that the American Society of Nutrition ( that creates our food labels ), is funded by food companies and can go as far as making a claim that Fruit Loops can have a nutritional checkmark on the front of the package.

I know it's all big money, and that the drug industry wants to keep us chronically sick, and that different food industries don't want to lose any of their 'stomach share'. 

I happen to have a bachelor of science degree in Food Science and Human Technology ( now that's from 25 years ago - which is seriously out of date, and I never did anything in that field ).   But I'm feeling that I need to update that degree somehow, become an activist, and start making a difference.  ( Of course I have no idea yet on how to make that difference.  )
« Last Edit: May 03, 2013, 10:36:24 AM by Rita »

HS4

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2013, 11:43:15 AM »
Thank you so much, Rita, for starting this topic.  It's something I've been thinking about for a long time now and especially since I read Gary Taubes book "Good Calories Bad Calories" (Fats, carbs and the controversial science of  diet and health).   I'm sure most people have heard of the book (if not read it, it's not an easy read) - it's sort of the 'bible' for many in the paleo and low carb communities, and definitely served as a trigger for many.  By the time I finished that book I was enraged. 
 
Taubes goes into detail how we've all been subject to an involuntary science experiment - mostly due to government intervention to tell us all how to eat! There were other factors as well, and much of it started in the 1940s and 1950s and has continued ever since. 
 
Taubes also wrote a (much shorter) book aimed at the general population that does not go into nearly as much technical detail as GCBC; this book is "Why we get fat and what to do about it".  It's a good and easy read!
 
Even though I've read quite a bit on this topic I am still trying to understand it and get my brain around exactly how this all came about.  I don't have time at the moment to write more but I really look forward to hearing what you and others have to say as well as continuing to post what my understanding is on some of the specifics.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2013, 12:30:38 PM »
I think I may just have to get that book!  ( http://www.amazon.com/Good-Calories-Bad-Controversial-Science/dp/1400033462  )  Probably get me even more enraged.  lol

Joan from MN

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 173
  • Wheat free since 1/20/13
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2013, 02:09:08 PM »
I read Taubes' GCBC a few years ago, right before I got into all this Paleo, low carb stuff. Just started reading Taubes' Why We Get Fat and am prepared to get enraged all over again. When I look at the USDA food pyramid and see the recommended 6-11 servings of grains, cereal, and rice PER DAY, I just think WHY??? Even if grains were a good idea, why so many servings? We've been sold a bill of goods in so many ways!
 
Food politics and nutrition are my passion, and I'll talk about it with any person who is willing to listen. Unfortunately, those people (in daily life anyway) are few and far between, which is why I'm so grateful for this forum, the Wheat Belly blog, and all the other helpful websites. I can just picture the horrified looks on my friends and family members' faces if they saw me melt a whole tablespoon of unsalted butter in my tea this morning. In this respect, I feel like I'm part of a burgeoning underground movement. It's kind of exciting and terrifying at the same time, if that makes sense. 

Neicee

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 27
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2013, 06:13:12 PM »
The little hidden secrets are farm subsidies, under the USDA.  If farmers of wheat/grain/and sugar beets were forced to charge what their product's actual costs are, the general public would soon eat less.  If ranchers, and ultimately feedlots and packing plants, had to pay the actual cost of grain to fatten up those cows/pigs/and chicken for market (without the subsidies to farmers of grain) - we'd soon find a whole bunch grass fed.  Healthier for the consumer, and possibly, cheaper for the consumer.  It all ends up with the American taxpayer footing the bill for some to make money and some, the consumer, to become hideously ill.
Disclaimer:  My husband was raised on a cattle ranch.  Yes, corn fed cows are a lot tastier and tender than grass fed.  If given a choice I'd also go for the grain fed cow.  The only answer I can find is to force Monsanto to stop marketing the GMO grains, they and other companies have developed, to the world.   

Neicee

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 27
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2013, 06:34:02 PM »
I should make another disclaimer:  Only the huge grain farmers (mega corporations) and packing plants make any real money on their products.  The small ranchers and small farmers are left begging to market a whole year's hard work and labor to the larger market aka the middle people.  They work an entire year only to have to ask what the market will pay them in the end.  In the end, our rural farmers and ranchers sell for just enough to pay their bills and the mega corporations make the real money...then the middle men, then the grocery stores.  Then we can explore how the American taxpayer subsidizes the mega farmers, who then exports to foreign countries and make tons of money.

Kezza

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 19
  • Grain free since 5 April 2013
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2013, 06:50:14 PM »
Hi guys I thought I'd weigh in on this even though I'm in Australia.  I got really, really angtry for about 24 hours when I realised that my quaility of life had been sabotaged by my acceptance of the low fat/high carb mantra that has been fed to us.  How many years have we failed to have the quality of life we are entitled to because of politics of food .  Big agribusiness and big pharma have ripped us off royally.
Rita if you are considering updating your qualifications please allow me to suggest Nora Gedgaudas book "Pimal Body, Primal Mind", Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life. http://www.primalbody-primalmind.com/

 
 

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2013, 07:58:00 PM »
This is a great conversation!  I appreciate all the thoughts and recommendations so far!

Bea

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 45
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2013, 12:39:00 AM »
Throughout my career and especially now in retirement I have "gone against the grain". My parents were forthright and stood up for various things - in health, education, and in many other areas. So I just assumed I had to speak out when I recognized something that was not "right". Even before I got my first degree I had begun on this path. Over the years I have sought out information, and relevant contact persons etc - mainly in the fields of education, health and welfare. I used to seek out grants, speak at conferences, and take on issues in professional settings etc. Now in retirement I still seek out opportunities to Advocate and Speak to Community groups etc. One of the topics I have been speaking on has a title :Taking Care of Your Health" - this began as keeping records of your health including test results, becoming an empowered patient - and more recently I have given talks about Cancer, Diabetes, Dementia, and "Wheat Belly". Always  challenging the usual advice, and I'm about to give talks based on the book "Salt, Sugar Fat" i.e about how Big business has made profits and made us fat and ill.

In answer to the question of where to begin I believe you need to start with yourself - there are several things one can do.  Initially clarify what you feel you would like to do, and your skills - and what you would like to learn. Take any courses, read books etc about presenting  - advocating, writing and so on.

This is a topic I am passionate about. It starts with your conviction. The path is not easy, and you need to learn to deal with the barbs and rejection - but I never want to stop making a difference!

Bea - Gold Coast, Australia

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2013, 06:39:10 AM »
Rita.....thank you for starting this conversation because I feel the same way. While I'm enraged that politics plays any role at all in our health and diet, we're seeing firsthand that it does. Some days I wake up and I'm overwhelmed by the enormity of the changes that need to take place and being an impatient person, those changes can't happen soon enough!


So where do we go from here?  We're advocates for this lifestyle and we can influence those in our immediate circle, at least some of them, anyway......but Like you, I want to look at the bigger picture and advocate for a wider audience. Do we bind together and organize health seminars featuring Dr. Davis, as well as other speakers? Do we get articles in publications?  How can we be instrumental in our communities to get the word out.....take copies of the book to local health care providers?  For those of us with employees, how can we positively influence them? If we're on the PTO/PTA, how can we instigate change on the school front? If we're in a book club, introduce Wheat Belly! I guess I have more questions than answers, don't I? 


I'm comfortably retired......with a passion for this subject and am dedicated to working in whatever capacity to further this grass root movement. So let's figure something out!

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2013, 07:23:05 AM »
BTW......the Food Revolution Network is having their summit featuring several speakers.....I wrote, inquiring why Dr. Davis was not included on the roster but haven't heard back......

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2013, 03:02:23 PM »
I'm seriously thinking about going back to school ( I'm 48 ), to get certification to become a holistic nutritionist.

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2013, 03:22:51 PM »
Now that's an ambitious and great idea Rita!  But at 61, my preference would be to get my law degree and spend my remaining years suing all the bad guys!!!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2013, 03:34:22 PM »
Quote
But at 61, my preference would be to get my law degree and spend my remaining years suing all the bad guys!!!


Well you certainly would get rich.  Think of the class action suits ( like with the tobacco industry ).

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2013, 03:47:18 PM »
I really don't want to get rich......just get some justice!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2013, 04:21:12 PM »
I was looking at the reading list of books required to become an NTP   ( Nutritional Therapy Practitioner ), and one of the books is Know Your Fats : The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils and Cholesterol


I always like to read the reviews of these books, and the first review was fascinating.   Apparently the author is one of the world's leading lipid biochemists, so she knows her stuff.


I'm going to copy/paste one of the reviews here, because it's so interesting.  The bold is my highlight.

Quote
This book, written by one of the world's leading lipid biochemists, is a much needed title in today's "fat-phobic" world. Discarding politically correct notions that saturated fats are unhealthy, Dr. Mary Enig presents a thorough, in-depth, and understandable look at the world of lipids.The publication of Know Your Fats is a rare treat: it is, to this reviewer's knowledge, the ONLY book on fats and oils for the consumer and the professional written by a recognized authority in the field. Virtually all of the titles on fats and oils in print now are either too technical to be accessible by the layman, or are too error-laden to be worth the paper they are printed on.

Mary Enig made her mark in the nutritional world in 1978 when she and her colleagues at the University of Maryland published a now-famous paper in the American journal Federation Proceedings. The paper directly challenged government assertions that higher cancer rates were associated with animal fat consumption. Enig, et al, concluded that the data actually showed vegetable oils and trans-fatty acids to be the culprits in both cancer and heart disease--not naturally saturated fats that people have been eating for millennia. In the ensuing years, Enig and her colleagues focused their work on determining the trans-fatty acid content of various food items, as well as publishing research that clearly demonstrated TFA's to be potent carcinogens, prime factors in heart disease, disruptors of immune function, and worse.

Enig's book begins like any other on lipid biochemistry and discusses the nature of saturates, monounsaturates, polyunsaturates, and trans-fatty acids. Included also is a revealing discussion of cholesterol and its vital importance to the body. The first chapter also clearly discusses the molecular structure of different fatty acids (with diagrams) and presents the metabolic conversion products of each of the major fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, linolenic, and palmitoleic).

The physiology of fats and cholesterol is fully covered in chapter two. Almost half of this chapter is devoted to shattering popular myths about saturated fats and their roles as disease promoters. Not mincing any words, Enig methodically demonstrates the faulty data and reasoning behind the ideas that saturates either cause or contribute to heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, mental illness, obesity, and cerebrovascular disease. For example, after trashing the "data" that supposedly prove that beef and beef fat caused colon cancer, Enig flatly concludes: "And now, more than three (3) decades after the initial fraudulent report, the anti-animal fat hypothesis continues to lead the nutrition agenda. It was a false issue then, and it remains a false issue today."

Subsequent chapters deal with fats historically used in Western diets; the fatty acid composition of various oils and fats such as coconut, butter, lard, and olive oil; and a succinct summary of "fat facts." The book is rounded out by detailed appendices on definitions, fatty acids in a huge number of foods, and molecular compositions of major fatty acids.

What is most telling, however, is Enig's insider take on the nutritional research world and the forces at play that manipulate the facts. Never one to shy away from controversy, Enig makes some pretty strong indictments of such organizations as the American Dietetics Association, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the American Heart Association, and the food industry in general. More shocking are her thoughts on research scientists:

"The common scenario is that of a highly intelligent person . . . who finds a research task that will lead to funding from the food and/or pharmaceutical industry or from the industry-controlled government agencies. If that research shows an adverse effect of any of the new foods studied, this is frequently ignored. . . . Of course, the research that is done by the industry-supported scientists is good basic research, and it usually is of great interest so as long as it supports the food industry or avoids a clash with the industry it is promoting. What seems so ironic, is that the very foods (saturated fats and cholesterol) that people are avoiding are the very foods that are healthful. When it comes to fat, this really has become the age of the flat earth."

Hopefully, Know Your Fats will help make the earth round once more.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2013, 04:26:34 PM by Rita »

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2013, 04:36:08 PM »
And speaking of the American Heart Association, when I went into Walgreens, there was an option to add an extra amount to your bill for the American Heart Association.  Normally I add a buck or so when retailers do fund raisers.  But today, I felt mad at the Heart Association for not being truthful to the public, so I wasn't about to give them a dime.  They're in the pocket of the drug companies and food manufacturers.  It's really not about the consumer at all. 

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2013, 05:39:02 PM »
I'm with you....am re-thinking my charitable allocations.....would rather buy WB books to give away, even though they're not tax deductible!  So where can you get a holistic nutritional certification?  I think that's fantastic!!!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2013, 05:40:43 PM »
I was looking at this site:  http://nutritionaltherapy.com

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2013, 05:45:59 PM »
OMG Rita......I could do that too!!!  Thank you for sending!

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2013, 05:53:31 PM »
Rita.....we might ask Dr. D's opinion of the program but it sure looks do-able, especially online....since I live in two places!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 07:42:53 PM »
Quote
OMG Rita......I could do that too!!!  Thank you for sending!


Maybe they'll give us a group discount!  :)


Actually... I think it would be fun. Granted... it's $3800.


Quote
Rita.....we might ask Dr. D's opinion of the program but it sure looks do-able, especially online....since I live in two places!


I think that they focus on a more paleo diet, which means it's a grain free approach.



« Last Edit: May 04, 2013, 07:45:01 PM by Rita »

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #22 on: May 05, 2013, 10:12:50 AM »
Well I just bought the fat book I mentioned above.  Really looking forward to reading it.   I also need it so that I can change the way our family eats, because my husband who has had a heart attack, says he needs proof that fat and eggs are okay for him to eat.   He still wants to do everything according to what the American Heart Association says, which still promotes wheat and  things like Canola Oil of all things.  They also don't want you to eat coconut oil.   


I can't blame him, as it is a life/death choice for him.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 10:15:58 AM by Rita »

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2013, 11:24:20 AM »
Rita,
Here's another interesting site.....James mentioned it once on WB.....she has numerous links.


http://diagnosisdiet.com/food/vegetables/

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2013, 08:40:54 AM »
Jan -   I'd say that at this point, there is about a 90% chance that I'm going to go forward with the program to become a nutritional therapist at  http://nutritionaltherapy.com  .    I bought the fat book, which should arrive shortly, so I figure I'll start reading my first text book since the course doesn't start until September.   It looks like most everything can be done as long distance learning, but that there are still 3 'hands on' sessions that are either 3 or 4 days long that can be taken in 1 of 5 locations around the US.  Sort of thinking about doing the ones in WA, as I love the Pueget Sound.  http://nutritionaltherapy.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Olympia-WA-2013-14.pdf .


I talked to some family and friends about it and told them I'm considering a career change.  They actually thought it would be perfect for me.  I'll still continue managing all my various web businesses while doing this.   

HS4

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2013, 09:00:59 AM »
Rita - if you haven't seen it already, you (and others here) might be interested in checking out the website for the Weston A Price Foundation (at www.westonaprice.org).  This group was founded by the author of the primer on fats you mentioned above, Mary Enig, and by Sally Fallon.  The prime purpose of the foundation is to bring back tradtional foods, which they do in many different ways.  They are staunch defenders of raw dairy, healthy fats (animal fats, coconut oil, etc...), and traditional preparation of other foods especially grains, nuts and seeds.  They are extremely active in exposing modern health myths, such as soy being a 'health food'.
 
I do not agree with their philosophy concerning grains, especially wheat.  A few years ago I did try their suggestions about only eating wheat that has been sprouted, fermented, or soaked and for a few months I thought this was working (i.e. I was able to eat wheat without getting sick and without joint pains).  However, I gradually realized that this wasn't the answer and of course, it wasn't until I read WB that I understood why.  The various pre-treatments for wheat do reduce phytic acid content but not entirely and it's not enough in any case to overcome the other serious drawbacks to wheat.
 
If you just ignore their advice on grains, the rest of their material is fascinating, especially studies of foods found in traditional cultures.  Their work is based on the research & travels of Dr Weston Price, a dentist, who traveled around the world (1920s I believe) initially just to study dental health amongst different cultures & tribes.  However, he soon realized that there were many factors in common amongst peoples from vastly different locations and cultures.  He also was startled by the decline in health amongst traditional peoples exposed to modern foods and diets.  He too extensive photos of the people he met and wrote up his experiences.  A must read for all nutritionists: "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration" by Weston A Price.  This classic has been recently re-issued by WAPF and the Pottenger Foundation (another one to check out!) and is now available from Amazon for a reasonable price.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2013, 09:06:02 AM »
Thanks for the tip on that.   Here's something I just read on their site:
Quote
Washington, DCMarch, 15, 2013According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, American consumers are crying foul over a dairy industry petition to add artificial sweeteners to flavored milks, without nutrient content labeling. If FDA answers in the affirmative, artificial sweeteners will take the place of sugar in flavored milk served to school children and to many other classes of dairy products.

Numerous scientific studies point to toxic effects of aspartame, including cancer, digestive issues and memory impairment. In spite of this evidence, the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) and the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) recently submitted a petition to the FDA to hide the chemical sweetener without declaring it on the front of the packaging.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2013, 09:14:20 AM by Rita »

HS4

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2013, 02:16:51 PM »
That's outrageous but I suppose I shouldn't be surprised.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2013, 03:40:23 PM »
So I'm doing all this research on which school to attend to become and NTP  ( Nutritional Therapist Practitioner ), which is a holistic side of nutrition therapy.   Anyhow,  I just received an email newsletter from the National Association of Nutritional Professionals (since I joined their newsletter), and it says:

Quote
You probably already know about the efforts going on around the US to take away our right to practice Holistic Nutrition.  Some of our top NANP members, widely known and admired for their books, expertise, and RESULTS, have been handed cease and desist orders in several states.  Will your state be next?  We hope not - and NANP is doing its VERY best to make your voice heard in state governments in communities across the land.

I then Google to find out more, and I come across this article:

http://www.anh-usa.org/how-the-american-dietetic-association-is-strengthening-its-monopoly/

Quote
The ADA  is clever. It gets legislation passed under the radar, when no one is looking. And natural health nutritionists are getting a rotten deal.As we reported a few weeks ago, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has sponsored legislation in over 40 states. These bills usually lump dietitians and nutritionists into one licensing scheme, and require nutritionists to complete a dietitian program in order to practice nutritional therapy. Even if the nutritionist holds a Masters or a PhD in nutrition, the nutritionist is still required to complete registration through the ADA in order to keep practicing.

This is the organization that lists among its corporate sponsors soft drink giants Coca-Cola and PepsiCo, cereal manufacturers General Mills and Kelloggs, candy maker Mars, and Unilever, the multinational corporation that owns many of the worlds consumer products brands in foods and beverages.

The ADAs legislative manipulations are able to go undetected because it takes years for a bill to go through the regulatory phase and be implementedso few people become aware of the full consequences of the law. Moreover, the ADA hasnt yet pulled the trigger sending out cease-and-desist letters to nutritionists everywhere telling them they can no longer practicebut you can rest assured this will happen, as soon as the organization has its monopoly firmly established. In the meantime they go on to lobby for new legislation in other states.

On the WestonAPrice site ( http://www.westonaprice.org/health-issues/what-should-i-do-to-be-a-nutritionist ) they have this to say about dietitians:

Quote

TRAINED TO DISPENSE PROCESSED FOOD
Registered Dietitians generally get a bad rap in the alternative medical and nutrition communities. After all, they are the people who serve up white bread, jello and foods fried with trans fats in school and hospital cafeterias, who help doctors enforce lowfat, low-cholesterol diet plans and advise weight loss patients to drink calorie-free diet sodas. Indeed, the ADA thinks that plenty of processed, packaged and fast foods, are just fine in the context of a varied diet.


As Mary Enig, PhD, MACN, is fond of saying, Dietitians are trained to dispense processed food. Although theres an excellent chance that processed food would be poor nutritionally, the ADA generally advises against vitamins, minerals or other supplements. It also sees no reason to go organic, grassfed or non-GMO. As for raw milk, the very idea is unsafe, unsanitary, outdated, illegal and otherwise beyond the pale.Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, celebrity nutritionist and fitness trainer and author of The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earthand numerous other books, pulls no punches when he writes about the ADA on his website www.jonnybowden.com. The American Dietetic Association at this point has no useful purpose on the planet except to protect its union members and shill for its flatliner positions, which are now running about two decades behind their sell-by date. 

Lovely.  Food politics at it's best.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 03:55:10 PM by Rita »

Linda R

  • Guest
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2013, 04:46:47 PM »
Wow!
Have you all seen this?
Worldwide March Against Monsanto


May 25th


http://occupy-monsanto.com/tag/march/


The list of countries is quite amazing.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #30 on: May 07, 2013, 06:49:39 PM »
Good share Linda.  Wow -  that's major worldwide participation there!  That date works for me, so I'm going!

Weeksie

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 46
  • Wheat free since 03/11/13
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #31 on: May 07, 2013, 07:11:28 PM »
I started WB after I watched "hungry for change". It opened my eyes. We found the documentary on Netflix. Highly recommend. I incorporate many of the ideas in our WB diet.  Today the president of our food co-op sent a very informative email about the meat industry. I will try to copy and forward.
 
Oklahoma Food Cooperative
May 7, 2013

When it comes to meat, you get what you pay for. That's true for all our food, but the issues are particularly evident when it comes to industrial scale meat.

Injustice to livestock ranchers.
The first problem with the conventional industrial meat industry is injustice to livestock ranchers.  Most of them have herds of mother cows and produce crops of calves.  After weaning, the calves are raised on pasture until a year or two old and maybe 550 to 700 pounds. Then they are sold into the feedlot industry.

The livestock producer in this situation has zero control over his or her prices.  They are at the mercy of the packing industry, which has always conspired to lower prices paid to ranchers.  With the on-going consolidation in the meat packing industry -- just FOUR COMPANIES control EIGHTY PERCENT of the beef processing industry -- there is little competition to drive prices paid to the ranchers for their cattle.

Oklahoma is one of the top five suppliers, together with Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, and Texas. In the 1960's, the top four processing corporations controlled only 25% of the market. They now control 80% of the market.

One result of the system is that in the last 20 years, a half million independent livestock producers have sold out and quit the business. The operations that have the hardest times are those who are running 300-400 head of cattle, manage the operations themselves, and live off the proceeds.

We should note that this consolidation has not been an accident, it has been an act of government policy and doesn't represent the action of a truly free market by any definition of the term. It is operated for the benefit, not of people, but of economic oligarchs.

The situation is worse, if you can imagine that, for independent poultry and egg producers.

So the first reason to buy meat, poultry, and eggs directly from farmers is to end your subsidy of the destruction of the independent livestock producer.  Every time you buy meat in a big supermarket, you are voting to destroy our independent livestock producers and turn the whole situation over to giant corporations. 
Food Safety Issues
Between 1995 and 2000, the USDA recalled 140 million pounds of meat. Alas, only 30% of that was actually recovered. When meat is recalled, it is nearly always because of contamination with e-coli bacteria, which is potentially deadly.  Much of the unrecovered meat probably was eaten, and may have produced illnesses and even death.
As far as I am concerned, buying meat at a big supermarket is like voluntarily participating in a retail version of Russian Roulette. 
Food Adulteration Issues
The infamous Pink Slime scandal comes immediately to mind as only the first of a series of problems with adulteration of food products.  We're importing a lot of processed food from China these days -- it's very cheap to operate there -- and anyone who thinks there is anyone in China watching out over food safety should think again because if there's one thing the Chinese are known for, it is "adulterating food with toxic products." 

Pink slime is an interesting case in point, however, because when uncovered by intrepid reporters, it was completely legal to adulterate meat products with this product, euphemistically named "Lean finely trimmed beef" or "boneless lean beef trimmings".  Yummy.  It remains legal today. By USDA regulation, up to 15% of a meat product -- including ground beef -- could be pink slime and it's not even included on the list of ingredients.  As of March 2012, when the story broke, SEVENTY PERCENT of ground beef sold in US supermarkets contained pink slime!!!!!  Here is what Wikipedia says about its manufacture --
"It is produced by processing low-grade beef trimmings and other meat by-products such as cartilage, connective tissue and sinew, which contain fat and small amounts of lean beef, and mechanically separating the lean beef from the fat through the use of a centrifuge heated to approximately 100F (38C). The heating process liquefies the fat and facilitates the separation of lean beef from the fat and other meat by-products. The recovered beef material is then processed, heated, and treated with gaseous ammonia or citric acid to kill E. coli, salmonella, and other bacteria. When gaseous ammonia is used, after coming in contact with water in the meat, it forms into ammonium hydroxide.The product is finely ground, compressed into pellets or blocks, flash frozen and then shipped for use as an additive."
 
With the controversy raging, many fast food chains and grocery stores stopped using the additive, but it remains "on the menu" in our public schools.
 
And then of course there is "Mechanically Separated Chicken" or "Mechanically Separated Turkey", but there are only so many horror stories that I can manage to write about at any one time.
 
Livestock Cruelty
There is a long list of terror stories that could be told about livestock cruelty in the giant commercial feedlot and processing industry.  We could start with the common practice of burning off the beaks of chickens kept in cages so they don't peck themselves and each other to death in their misery. Such practices are so prevalent that in many states, corporations are getting laws passed that actually forbid taking videos of these activities "in process" because they know that people will be outraged if they see the truth about the way these concentration camps operate.  Never mind our constitutional protections like Freedom of the Press and Freedom of Speech. 
 
The Bottom Line.
Supermarket meats are cheaper than those sold at the Coop because  --
•   Giant corporations control the meat processing market and they regularly cheat livestock producers by manipulating the market to lower cattle prices.  The government does nothing about this for obvious reasons.
•   Their concentrated production and centralized processing facilities breeds dangerous microbes and spreads them throughout our food supply.
•   They adulterate their products.  Besides pink slime already mentioned, think about those little fine print details you see on ham and poultry products -- "Broth solution added" -- which means you are paying meat prices for water.
•   The concentrated production and centralized processing facilities use inhumane procedures that cause unnecessary cruelty and pain to animals.
Supporting local producers supports your family's health and quality of life.
If you want a meat system characterized by cruelty to animals and injustice to livestock operators, that puts your family regularly at risk of eating contaminated food, where you pay full price for adulterants like pink slime and beef broth, and where production practices degrade the natural environment and contaminate our air, water, and soils, then fine, shop at the supermarket for your meats.  That's what you are paying for and that's what you will get.
 
On the other hand, if you want a more sustainable, just, and humane system of livestock production, that provides your family with safe and healthy and tasty food products, then buy meat directly from Oklahoma farmers through the Coop or at your local farmers market.  Don't be fooled by big "ALL NATURAL" labels on meat packages in supermarkets.  That sticker means nothing. 
 
Yes, it's more expensive, but it is an honest price that reflects realities and that does not subsidize economic injustice, animal cruelty, and environmental devastation.  I work for a church, I am not making minimum wage, but I am also not making big bucks either.  So we eat lots of ground meat, and less expensive meats like round steak and chuck roasts.  No one complains about the food at my house, and we stay within my food budget.  Yes, it doesn't look like the food from the supermarket, and thank God Almighty it doesn't taste like food from the supermarket and it doesn't trail bad baggage with it either.

« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 09:03:51 AM by Weeksie »

Kezza

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 19
  • Grain free since 5 April 2013
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2013, 07:58:30 PM »
Good share Linda.  Wow -  that's major worldwide participation there!  That date works for me, so I'm going!
Was looking at this and really hoping to attened until I discovered that the local mob were going to the Greens political party involved.  Sorry I can't support anything the Greens get involved in.  They are anti hunting and want us all to be vegans.
 

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #33 on: May 08, 2013, 06:22:25 AM »
Rita.......what program are you looking into? My husband is 72 and I'm 61.....would love to do something in the field of nutrition but am unsure as to what that would be at this stage.......probably something in the volunteer catagory. I was hoping Dr. D would put together a WB coaching class or something.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2013, 06:41:39 AM »
Was looking at the NTA program.  They are having a conference call tonight at 5pm PST for people interested in their program.  I'll message you with details.

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2013, 07:28:43 AM »
Thanks......but tonight am going to see Jillian Michaels.....YIKES......with my DIL, her hero!  Tough night ahead!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2013, 07:31:45 AM »
lol

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2013, 07:35:33 AM »
On FB this morning, Dr. D had the transcript of Rush Limbaugh's show on the gluten-free 'mania'......of course, he got it wrong!  Anyway, Dr. D just put on Rush's email address: ElRushba@eibnet.com
Might be a good idea if we wrote and asked for him to put Dr. D on the show to set the record straight!

HS4

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #38 on: May 08, 2013, 10:12:17 AM »
Re: emailing Rush Limbaugh. That would be Elrushbo@eibnet.com (Elrushbo@eibnet.com)
 
I think it would be a good idea to write to him - I heard the call and initially thought he understood what the caller was saying but by the end of it, it was clear he didn't.

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #39 on: May 08, 2013, 11:00:29 AM »
Yes, I wrote and I was very nice!

Linda R

  • Guest
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #40 on: May 08, 2013, 11:03:51 AM »
From Weeksie.........................
Quote
So the first reason to buy meat, poultry, and eggs directly from farmers is to end your subsidy of the destruction of the independent livestock producer.  Every time you buy meat in a big supermarket, you are voting to destroy our independent livestock producers and turn the whole situation over to giant corporations. 
Food Safety Issues




Excellent post, just wish I had started paying more attention to all of this sooner.

Joan from MN

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 173
  • Wheat free since 1/20/13
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #41 on: May 08, 2013, 11:09:50 AM »
On FB this morning, Dr. D had the transcript of Rush Limbaugh's show on the gluten-free 'mania'......of course, he got it wrong!  Anyway, Dr. D just put on Rush's email address: ElRushba@eibnet.com
Might be a good idea if we wrote and asked for him to put Dr. D on the show to set the record straight!

Good idea.
 
And maybe it's me, but it seems like the FB crowd in general is a bit...testy? I rarely comment in that neighborhood.

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #42 on: May 08, 2013, 11:18:45 AM »
Yes, some of the FB crowd can be less than nice at times!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #43 on: May 26, 2013, 01:43:22 PM »
Here's an interesting interview on food politics:



Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #44 on: May 26, 2013, 04:28:58 PM »
WOW....I'm impressed! That took me down a long and interesting road! One could spend all day on Michele Simon's blog and she's so right.....we need to become educated in how to counter the industry!

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #45 on: June 04, 2013, 05:39:53 AM »
In the financial news the past few days, Monsanto and Proctor & Gamble (one of the biggest advertisers in the country) announced that their pay schedule will now be 75 days out! They are ssoooo big that they can now dictate when they will pay their bills! This is big news and will have negative and destructive consequences on our economy.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #46 on: June 04, 2013, 07:47:15 AM »
Oh geez... nice companies to do business with!

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #47 on: June 08, 2013, 10:23:18 AM »
This is cool.....today on the site, It's Primal Ya'll......they had a quote from one of our members on the WheatFreeForum..... http://itsprimalyall.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/random-roundup-4/
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 09:15:10 PM by Rita »

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2013, 09:23:05 PM »
Quote
This is cool.....today on the site, It's Primal Ya'll......they had a quote from one of our members on the WheatFreeForum..... http://itsprimalyall.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/random-roundup-4/


Very cool to have a quote.  And congrats to Janet for having the quote.  Here's the link to that discussion:
http://wheatfreeforum.com/index.php/topic,89.msg788.html#msg788

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Food Politics
« Reply #49 on: July 20, 2013, 02:32:02 PM »
Just watching this video today ( sort of a documentary, and it's free for the remainder of today ), and they claim that there is a cure to cancer, but politics squelch it because being sick is big business:


https://vimeo.com/69209285

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Food Politics
« Reply #49 on: July 20, 2013, 02:32:02 PM »

Sponsored Links