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Author Topic: Recipes  (Read 14773 times)

ldyrdr4311

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Recipes
« on: May 04, 2014, 03:13:33 PM »
Hi all:
  Was browsing on the Internet today, and I am amazed at how many paleo recipes are out there that can be easily adapted to our WOE. One just has to pay attention to the ingredients and try to figure out the net carb. content (which I am not very good at...keep forgetting the "formula" for figuring that out).
   Came across this site;  http://fastpaleo.com and found a recipe that I'm most anxious to try out called "Asparagus and Bacon Quiche with Spaghetti Squash Crust".
  There are many versions of this recipe, but all of them use the spaghetti squash for the crust. One reviewer (on another site) said that it was mushy & that she wouldn't make it again. This recipe has instructions to cook the squash first, then bake it in the pie pan at 400 degrees for 10 min. I believe that's what she should have done with the version of this recipe. It just seems like common sense to do so first.
 
ldyrdr4311

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2014, 04:38:59 PM »
> ... amazed at how many paleo recipes are out there that can be easily adapted to our WOE

Perhaps half of ours were developed that way.

> One just has to pay attention to the ingredients ...


If the recipe doesn't say, sites like http://nutritiondata.self.com/ are useful for raw food elements (ignore their ignorant health scores). The main thing to beware of in random paleo/primal/LCHF recipes is "natural" sugars (esp. "honey") that are high gly.

> and try to figure out the net carb. content (which I am not very good at...keep forgetting the "formula" for figuring that out).

Net carbs = total carbs minus "fiber carbs".
This is just a rule of thumb, and "fiber carbs" can both overstate and understate metabolic response (even to the same ingredient prepared and served different ways, like resistant starches).

The real bottom line is blood sugar response; ideally no rise, but to a value of 100 mg/dl or less in any case.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2014, 07:21:41 AM »
Hi ldyrdr,


There are just too many sites to even review!  I've found that many of my old tried and true recipes can mostly be adapted to this way of eating.
Now that resistant starches are acceptable again, it can include many more dishes.  Shephard's Pie with a thin potato crust!  Home fries!  Potato salad!


I'm still learning how to adapt condiments to avoid the sugar and vegetable oils.  Home made mayo and catsup ?  Unthinkable before WB! Conversations  about the quality of spices ?  30 seconds would do it!   


So many of the recipes need tweaking like the spaghetti squash quiche.  Your good sense when trying these recipes is as important as the ingredients.  It does take time to become familiar with using the ingredients in a different way.  Sometimes the recipes are easily fixable.  Sometimes they aren't.  Sometimes they are good, but not to my taste.  After 1.5 years grain and wheat free, I'm still adapting and learning.


By the way, GourmetGirlCooks has recently published an excellent recipe for sandwich buns, hot dog rolls and dinner rolls, all slight variations on the same recipe.  It was good enough to buy a 4' muffin top pan so I can make the right size hamburger rolls.  This way of eating gets easier and easier.


Thanks for the squash/asparagus quiche post.  Looks like a good one for a brunch.  And you are right about precooking the squash to dry it out for the crust.  Nearly all the recipes with "crusts" do this and also many cook their veggie toppings or fillings separately just to drain the juices.



Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2014, 12:42:42 PM »
Barbara mentioned the Gourmet Girl Cooks bun recipe. I have made them twice and instead of a muffin top tin, I use english muffin rings. Work beautifully and now we can have grilled cheese sandwiches again (had them last night).


One recipe makes 8 sliceable muffins.


She has fabulous recipes and while she does not include nutritional information, it is my usual go-to source for recipes outside the WB books.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2014, 01:12:46 PM »
Lila,


I never heard of English muffin rings!  I bet that form works very well for a more substantial bun.  I can probably use a foil or parchment paper liner to raise the edge of my 4" muffin top pan which I bought to make rolls to fit my hamburgers.  Very clever idea!   ;D

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2014, 05:52:17 PM »
Barbara I got them from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0001VQIHW/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Funny they are $2 bucks more than when I bought them. I got two sets for just over $12.


I don't have any coconut oil spray so I use olive oil spray and then bake them on parchment. Beautiful.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2014, 05:27:21 AM »
Lila,

Thank you for the listing.  I never thought I would be purchasing more baking pans!  I loved to bake breads, pastries, cakes and all the rest.  Only made them for holidays and other special occasions.  When I realized I wasn't eating them because of acid reflux, I only made the minimum baked goods needed or purchased them.  Now I'm glad I didn't give away all my cookie cutters and other assorted baking items.

So far, I've purchased a small bread pan, donut pan, muffin top pan and lots of parchment paper.  I looked at the silicone mats, but wondered how they hold up and if they are any better than the reusable parchment paper.  Silicone "baggies" are not to my liking because of stiffness and how the seal can be easily damaged. 

The English Muffin rings would make a perfect size layer for open faced sandwiches, tuna melt type or covered with a hollandaise type sauce.   Getting hungry just thinking about this!  I am a big fan of melted cheese and tomato sandwiches.  Now I can do my favorite recipes for holiday brunch.   8)

ldyrdr4311

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2014, 12:05:38 PM »
"So far, I've purchased a small bread pan, donut pan, muffin top pan and lots of parchment paper.  I looked at the silicone mats, but wondered how they hold up and if they are any better than the reusable parchment paper.  Silicone "baggies" are not to my liking because of stiffness and how the seal can be easily damaged." 

Barbara:
  I purchased some silicone cupcake pans & a mat a few years ago, & for me, there were more negatives about them than positives:
  If you make the mistake of trying to towel dry these, they pick up lint from the dishtowels which is very difficult to remove.
  The pan isn't very stable. You need to have a flat baking pan underneath it because it isn't stiff enough to stay level when putting it into the oven.
 Dust also adheres to the surface. They need to be rinsed off first.
  These negatives alone made me donate them to Goodwill. I didn't care for the mat either.
   

Linda R

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2014, 12:08:44 PM »


 Dust also adheres to the surface. They need to be rinsed off first.
  These negatives alone made me donate them to Goodwill. I didn't care for the mat either.
 

Good idea, I think I will do the same with mine.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2014, 01:00:04 PM »
Now you've made me very happy that I didn't waste my money on them!  Thanks. 

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2014, 04:08:50 PM »
Barbara, the nice thing about the english muffin rings is that the "loaf" round is thick enough to slice. I also love grilled cheese & tomato and (after they are completely cool) when you slice it, you can grill the sucker on the Foreman grill. Yum yum.


I made French Toast with the rounds last week. Wonderful--never thought I'd have anything like French Toast again.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2014, 05:12:50 PM »
Lila,


French toast….o-o-o-o.  Never thought I'd be eating that again!  Add sliced strawberries and whipped cream for a Mother's Day breakfast.

Have you frozen these?  Do they get heavier sitting in the fridge for days?

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2014, 05:23:19 PM »
I keep them in the freezer, Barbara. I have not let them sit in the fridge so I don't know how they might change. I pop them in the toaster straight from the freezer, just like I used to do with english muffins.. They don't get really crispy in the toaster, but do get to be a nice golden brown.


The recipe calls for swerve sweetener and I commented to DH that you could almost use them as a short cake with strawberries. I will do that this weekend!  (I'm mother to two furry kitty creatures, so that qualifies for a special Mother's Day treat!)


Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2014, 05:43:55 PM »
Lila,


Celebrating all mother's in the past, present and future is what the day represents to me.  You honor and cherish them, even if you haven't given birth.  So honor and cherish as you wish!

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2014, 04:04:48 AM »
Lila,


You mean I can take my toaster out of storage??????    ;D ;D ;D


Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2014, 11:29:26 AM »
Lila,


I am psyched!!!  I called the kitchen stores around here and Sur la Table had only 1 package of four round tins available for $6.00.  Sure they are thin and a bit flimsy, but they aren't holding much and should work just fine.  You are right about the extra thickness needed for french toast or the shortcake or anything needing a sauce like hollandaise or a gravy. 

The salesman was astonished that I purchased the last one.  Seems that these are flying off the shelves everywhere.  Wonder if it is all our WB friends?  The stainless steel forms were sold out.  No surprise that they raised the price.


Someone wrote GGC that they used a 7x11 pan and cut it into squares for sandwiches. 

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2014, 02:04:41 PM »
I will probably always use the rounds when I make this bread. I'm so happy with it. My english muffin tins are pretty sturdy. Just spray with olive oil and put on parchment. No problems and they come out beautifully.


I use an ice cream scoop and then use wet fingertips to spread out the dough. The recipe that GG posted will make 8 nice "muffins."

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2014, 02:05:36 PM »
Also--somebody wrote somewhere that they use tuna cans with both top & bottom removed. I thought they might be too big and deep.


Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2014, 05:10:58 PM »
Hi Lila,


A celebrity chef used tuna cans but most people found that they didn't like the sharp bottom of the can because it had a rounded edge and it was difficult to get a clean cut.  Much safer using the tin forms.  Anyone who has ever cut their fingers on a tin can will agree that the risk isn't worth the minimal cost of the tins. 


Have a wonderful Mothers Day.


ldyrdr4311

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2014, 11:52:47 AM »
Boundless:
Thanks for your reply and those links. Those sure will help.

Barbara:
Please explain resistant starches, & how did those become acceptable again? Via Dr. Davis, or who?

And to all of you ladies out there:  HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!!

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2014, 12:33:57 PM »
I'm also interested in resistant starches---made some egg salad for lunch and was thinking it would be nice to have some potato salad once in awhile.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2014, 01:22:11 PM »
Ladies,

I'm hoping Rita will be able to give you lots more info.

 Dr. Paul Jaminet and his wife Dr. Shou Jaminet wrote a book "the Perfect Health Diet".  They discuss the need for healthful fiber from resistant starch and pectin, which are indigestible for humans.  Cooking the starchy vegetable gelatinizes the starch into a digestible enzyme called amylase.  Cooking and then cooling the starchy vegetable gelatinizes into a resistant starch like butyrate, among others.
This is described on pages 161-163. 

Butyrate (in rats) is known to stabilize blood sugar in diabetic rats, lowers triglycerides, blood cholesterol, fasting insulin, improves nerve function, reduces inflammation cytokines (inflammation) and calms the immune system among many other things.

The entire field of resistant starches is starting to be studied and, as such, is in a state of flux.  It seems to me that a 1/2 cup or so of resistant starch a few times a week would help keep your intestinal bacteria in balance and still allow for the 50 carbs per day recommendation.  That means cold potato salad is back on the menu!

I would suggest googling "resistant starch" for lots more information. 

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2014, 02:06:13 PM »
You know, I stopped using packaged grated cheese because of the potato starch but maybe it's not such a bad thing, on occasion.


Of course, if one made an egg salad and just put in a small diced cold potato, it might be really good.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2014, 02:50:39 PM »
Now you are thinking Lila!


I've no idea now about health benefit, if any, of the potato starch in packaged shredded cheese.  It will be interesting to read opinions on this from our gurus.  It is all in the process of cooking and cooling that makes the butyrate prebiotic we need.  I have been shredding cheese in my cuisinart and then bagging and freezing small portions.  It sure would be easier to buy a  bag already made. 

deanna in AR

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2014, 02:01:20 PM »
Lila, is the recipe you make in your English muffin rings called "Perfect Dinner Rolls -- Low Carb, Wheat/Grain & Gluten Free" by Gourmet Girl Cooks?
I'm also wondering if that's the recipe that can be changed up a bit for hot dog buns? I'm not the kind of cook that can just whip things up. Cooking does not come easy for me :(( Thanks!

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2014, 03:33:29 PM »
deanna, the recipe I use is the sesame seed bun recipe from GGC http://www.gourmetgirlcooks.com/2014/05/amazing-turkey-sandwich-on-sesame-seed.html


but I leave off the sesame seeds (makes them more versatile, i think).


She also posted a hot dog bun recipe: http://www.gourmetgirlcooks.com/2014/04/hot-dog-buns-wheat-grain-gluten-free.html.


I imagine they freeze well too!

deanna in AR

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2014, 02:02:15 PM »
Thank you Lila. I'm gonna try these. I've already ordered my English muffin rings!!!

ldyrdr4311

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2014, 10:03:26 AM »
Now you are thinking Lila!


I've no idea now about health benefit, if any, of the potato starch in packaged shredded cheese.  It will be interesting to read opinions on this from our gurus.  It is all in the process of cooking and cooling that makes the butyrate prebiotic we need.  I have been shredding cheese in my cuisinart and then bagging and freezing small portions.  It sure would be easier to buy a  bag already made. 

Barbara from NJ:
  Am considering getting a food processor, & you mention having a Cuisinart to shred cheese & then freezing it. If you don't mind, I'd like to ask you a couple of questions about your Cuisinart.

1) What size (cups) is it & how old is it (the older models seem to have held up better; I've seen many complaints about the bowls cracking).
2) When you shred the cheese, do pieces get caught under the blades? Does the cheese actually come out as a "shred", or do you get a bunch of crumbles?
3) Do you use the shredding blade for this, & are they a fine shred & thick(er) shred?

Not trying to be nosy here. A food processor is an investment for me. I'm trying to decide between a Cuisinart & another brand. Almost have made a decision, but not quite.

And, if any other members want to chime in on these questions, please do so! I need opinions here, & every little bit helps.  Thank You all, for your time.

Ldyrdr

mosey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2014, 10:48:47 AM »
I received a Cuisinart Food Processor as a wedding present in the late 70's. Still using it & it has held up better than my 1st husband. My only complaint is they no longer make parts for it & one of the shredder blades broke making sauerkraut. That blade design is no longer used. The old cheese shredder blades do collect nubs of cheese under the disc but I never found it a problem as I just added to the rest of the cheese. This is my go to machine for everything, including grinding almonds for flour, although that takes a  long time. I know this machine will pass  away of old age soon so I would like to hear reviews on the new ones.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2014, 12:15:03 PM »
Mosey and Ldy,


I am laughing at your comments!  I also had a beloved Cuisinart from the 70's!  Several of the blade stems broke and they couldn't be replaced.  Then the motor started to smell when I used it a lot.  After 30 years of fairly heavy use, I replaced it about 10 years ago.  My new one is trickier to clean, but it does do a good job.  The things to consider are ease of use, cleaning, various blades, strength of motor.  When they first came out, they were expensive!  There were lots of imitations, but few were as good as the Cuisinart brand.  The blades stayed sharp, even if the stem broke. These machines are still expensive.  This is because their motor is strong and the blades are good quality.  I can say I've never had the basket/tops of either one break or crack and I've dropped them many times. 


You should consider what kind  of cooking you do and how many people you cook for or how many parties you give that would require the large basket size.  I found it was terrific for making dough, slicing veggies, grating cheese, shredding potatoes and making pastes like hummus or with spices for a marinade.  I also used it to grate horseradish a few times!  This is a heavy machine and you will use it much more if you keep it on your kitchen counter rather than in a cabinet.  Not making pastry dough for tarts, pies, pot pies and similar items, I find I'm using it less.  I use my immersion hand blender much more often now.  With both machines, I never had a problem shredding cheese.  If anything collects on the blade then I just add it to the shredded stuff since this will all melt when heated.  Even really hard cheeses shred quickly.  The only thing to note is the size of the feed tube because that determines the size of the food item you can process.  My first machine had a small tube.  The new one's feed tube is twice the size which is very convenient.


These expensive cooks tools are worth every penny of cost because it saves my "wear and tear".   It was easy to make a pie crust, chop veggies for a pot of stew or whatever before WB.  Now that I am not buying the readymade stuff, I am starting to leave the machine on my kitchen counter again and I use it much more!  Cole slaw is a zip!  Chopped liver is easy!  I shred zucchini and yellow squash for pancakes.  You might even want to check out some of the optional blades and attachments.  The julienne disc and whisk are very nice to have as are the various size slicing discs.  I also have made various nut flours and butters when I can get the nuts cheap enough to bother. 


How much easier it is to shop for these things when you can read Amazon reviews!

Linda R

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2014, 12:18:56 PM »
I received a Cuisinart Food Processor as a wedding present in the late 70's. Still using it & it has held up better than my 1st husband.


Ha! I'm a Kitchen Aid kinda person, have a Kitchen Aid Stand mixer that I bought 25 - 30 years ago and it has outlasted all three of my husbands!


Due to it's longevity, my food processor is also a KitchenAid and I am very pleased with it as well.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #31 on: May 14, 2014, 12:38:43 PM »
Linda,


Very funny!  Good thing they didn't walk off with your machines!


I inherited my Mom's 1950's Kitchen Aide stand mixer.  Loved the machine.  Used it until a few years ago when the motor smelled like it was burning.  I now use just a hand mixer since I don't make any heavy doughs anymore.  Sure got our money's worth from Kitchen Aide. 

Jan in Key West

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2014, 05:31:31 PM »
I have the Cuisineart but bought a Ninja that is so easy to clean, that that's the one I use for everything these days....it has a small unit, as well as a large one....it goes in the dishwasher, hides behind my cabinet garage (I hate clutter on my countertop) and it's a fourth of the cost. The only issue is that it plastic.....and I've been trying to get rid of plastic.  It's very hard to do!

VibeRadiant

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #33 on: May 14, 2014, 07:47:24 PM »


 Dust also adheres to the surface. They need to be rinsed off first.
  These negatives alone made me donate them to Goodwill. I didn't care for the mat either.
 

Good idea, I think I will do the same with mine.


I recently bought a silicon cake pan and I love it! I've used it to make my gut healing gelatin, the jello is very easy to remove (I had been using tin foil). I've also used  it to make my chocolate delights, again, very easy to remove rather than pry the pieces out with a knife. I might even buy a second one.

ldyrdr4311

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2014, 05:29:57 PM »
Okay, everyone. Those older Cuisinart's do stand up to the test of time. The newer ones don't seem to. I went to Amazon.com to see what they had to say about the newer ones, & that's where most of the complaints are.

If yours are at least 10 years old, I can just about bet that they were made in the good ole U.S.A.,  & not in China. Yeah, they're supposed to be made as per specs, but when one sees how many of the bowls, stems, or blades come apart or crack, you have to wonder if those "specs" are really being followed as they're supposed to be. It's sad that so many manufacturers have resorted to this for their products.

Either way, I have to consider a food processor soon. My hands have a bit of trouble with doing things by hand. I do enough to warrant the use of a food processor, even more so in the near future. Thanks for your input.

If anyone else has another brand that they really like, enjoy using, I'd like to hear your comments also.  What a great group of people we have here! So glad I joined!
Ldyrdr

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #35 on: May 15, 2014, 05:54:11 PM »
Mine is also a Cuisinart--a 7 cup model that I got last year on sale (a steal I though) at Macy's for $39.99. I don't do heavy duty stuff like pulverizing horseradish. I love it. Grates cheese very well (that's what I use it most for) and for making the dough for my Russian tea cookies.


Highly recommend it.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #36 on: May 15, 2014, 06:44:36 PM »
Vibe,


Those silicon pans/molds are terrific for cold items like your jello or even molded chocolates/chocolate covered items.  Its the hot baking that causes the problems. The recipes for jello are very tasty! 


deanna in AR

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #37 on: May 17, 2014, 03:41:23 PM »
Lila, I made the buns. I'm wondering what I did wrong????? Mine didn't seem to rise ANY. I only got 7 buns instead of 8...and even then the muffin tins weren't quite full. I used 1/3 cup as my scoop. The only thing I can think of:




1. my baking powder was not fresh (to say the least).




2. I think mine needed a little more sweetener. I had Truvia, stevia and coconut sugar. My local store does not have Swerve. I used Truvia and really was just kind of guessing at the amount.




3. Oh, and also, I didn't sift the coconut flour...didn't notice that til it was too late. Wouldn't have mattered. I don't have a sifter anymore...got rid of it because I never used it. Would not sifting it cause a problem?




DH didn't really like the texture. We're going to try them again tonight for cheese toast with tomato slices and an avocado.

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #38 on: May 17, 2014, 04:25:50 PM »
I'm going to make some tomorrow. I'll take pictures.


I made french toast this morning. So yummy.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #39 on: May 17, 2014, 06:59:44 PM »
Deanna,


My guess is the same as yours: old baking powder.   Swerve is a 1:1 replacement for sugar so use that as your guide if lets say you want to try the Truvia as your sweetener.  Make sure you add a bit of salt too.  As far as sifting the coconut flour, you can break up any clumps with a fork and then just whisk it a bit with that fork to aerate it.


Hope this helps.

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2014, 07:45:03 PM »
I keep both my baking powder and baking soda in the freezer, along with most of my pungent spices.


Of course these days I'm baking more so I'm not sure if baking powder would be around long enough to get old.

deanna in AR

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #41 on: May 18, 2014, 06:08:37 AM »
Thanks Lila and Barbara. Our cheese toast was good in spite of everything. I'm gonna try it again when I get new baking powder. I made up 3 batches of dry ingredients yesterday, so I'll just add a little baking powder and sweetener on the second batch. Looking forward to your pictures Lila!

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #42 on: May 18, 2014, 09:46:37 AM »
deanna, here are before, and during pictures. I like them brown on top so they might be browner than you might want.


They do rise a bit but don't puff out over the ring, which is how I want them.

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #43 on: May 18, 2014, 09:47:06 AM »
These are the after.

deanna in AR

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #44 on: May 18, 2014, 11:07:27 AM »
Lila, yours did puff up compared to mine! We had BLT's with ours for breakfast this morning and they were really good. Just imagine when I get them right! Thanks for the pics and info!!

KareMI

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #45 on: May 24, 2014, 11:03:34 AM »
Just wanted to comment on making the Gourmet Girl Bun recipe. Excellent. I even bought the muffin rings from Amazon and they worked perfectly. We had tuna fish sandwiches yesterday for our dinner. Great tasting. I think I baked them a little too long so will shorten the time by a couple of minutes.

Linda R

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2014, 12:10:52 PM »
Just wanted to comment on making the Gourmet Girl Bun recipe. Excellent. I even bought the muffin rings from Amazon and they worked perfectly. We had tuna fish sandwiches yesterday for our dinner. Great tasting. I think I baked them a little too long so will shorten the time by a couple of minutes.


Do you have the carb count on these?


BTW  Love your photo, looks as though you are a cat lover as well...............................

Lila

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #47 on: May 24, 2014, 01:19:48 PM »
I calculated the carb count using myfitnesspal.com. I've attached the recipe and the nutritional info. (I used heavy whipping cream instead of buttermilk because i didn't have any buttermilk)


By these calculations, net carb count is 2 per muffin (I get 8 muffins per recipe)

Linda R

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #48 on: May 24, 2014, 02:01:14 PM »
Thx Lila!

Rita

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #49 on: May 24, 2014, 08:45:48 PM »
I love those muffin rings!  Haven't seen those before.

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Re: Recipes
« Reply #49 on: May 24, 2014, 08:45:48 PM »

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