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Author Topic: Onion Skin  (Read 2651 times)

BarbinNC

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Onion Skin
« on: July 26, 2014, 12:07:01 PM »
I got two organic chickens at Costco, to roast and then make bone broth.  I always add onion skin to clear soups and broth, it's just a habit I picked up from my Aunt in Germany, her soups were always a beautiful golden brown color, and she taught me to add the skins of a few onions. 


Again, there is more to it than the color though, didn't know this, but just came across this little bit of wisdom!




Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2014, 01:29:52 PM »
BarbinNC,


YES!  Keep a bag in your freezer for skins, cores and similar pieces of veggies you used to discard.  Chicken skin too.  Then add this to your bone broths with whole peppercorns.  Use every animal part that you can for the broth, not only the bones.   :)




BarbinNC

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2014, 12:04:46 PM »
I do exactly that, Barbara the bone broth has been simmering since last night at 7 PM .  8)

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2014, 02:42:22 PM »
I've never heard of this. Does it intensify the flavor, too?  I love that in soup, especially.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2014, 03:54:12 PM »
Lynda,


While making your bone broth or stock, you can add all the scraps and peels and skins to the liquid.   It all adds flavor and some nutrients.  There are numerous references to this in Nourishing Traditions.  When your stock has finished simmering, you drain liquid from the scraps, add it to the stock and discard the scraps.  I always add whole peppercorns and bay leaf to the stock as well as the bones and veggies.  By keeping a bag in your freezer, you just place the ends and peelings or even veggies past their prime into it and then place the contents in your water with your bones.

BarbinNC

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2014, 02:57:01 PM »
There is a difference between making soup, broth and bone broth.  For making broth, I add a lot more ingredients to my pot. I use two whole organic chickens, 1 or 2 onions, with skin, and extra onion skins, fresh garlic cloves, some whole carrots, celery stalks, parsnips, leaks, sometimes a whole tomato chopped, parsley stems and other herb stems, if I have them on hand.  Celtic sea salt and pepper corns, a bay leaf or two, sometimes Italian herbs.  Cold water to cover.  Bring to boil, turn down to very low and let simmer lightly for at least 3 hours.  Take chickens out, take meat off the bones, put the stock through a sieve.  Drink the broth, or make soup by chopping the veggies and returning to the broth, along with some of the chopped chicken meat.  That's soup then, with the stuff back in. My favorite chicken soup.  I sometimes add some miracle noodles now, it's nice that they never get soggy.


The bone broth starts now.  Take all the chicken bones, along with the rest of the meat on the bones, and some extra offal like livers and stomach etc. and simmer for at least 24 hours, along with some extra sea salt, and a shot of apple cider vinegar.  I have that pot going right now, after taking the first batch out last night.  It's amazing what you can get out of those organic chicken bones!

Jan in Key West

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2014, 05:42:58 PM »
BIG difference in meat verses bone broth.....when making beef bone broth from large marrow, small marrow, ligaments, cartilage, knuckles, hooves, and especially bones from the head area etc., it takes at least 72 hours of very low heat to leach all the nutrients from the bones....sometimes I do it longer.  Chicken takes 24+ hours since the bones are much less dense. Luckily, we have an organic-pastured area butcher where we buy a supply for the year.....hooves are more expensive since they are sold to organic makers of gelatin (Great Lakes to name one) at a premium. Beef stock/broth only takes 3 - 5 hours. We've been drinking 8 oz. bone broth (not meat stock) five days per week for over a year for breakfast and we're convinced it's paramount to a healthy gut and testament to our energy and slim figures.

BarbinNC

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2014, 09:00:34 PM »
Yes, obviously.  We were talking about adding onion skin and other ingredients, so for chicken soup, you would not simmer that sucker for 72 hours, lol!


And just a reminder, if you don't have a heavy lid, the liquid will evaporate, so very important to have a tight fitting lid, like a Le Creuset, to make sure you have any broth left!


 8)

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2014, 04:25:07 AM »
Using water, most people thin the soup base/broth/stock to use as your purpose and recipe calls for.   The length of time and ingredients simmered determines the complexity of flavors, nutrient content and best use.  The names are often used interchangeably, but soup typically means short time simmer, stock means a day or so simmer and bone broth means several days' simmer.   Meat based are typically used differently from fowl based infusions.

BarbinNC

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2014, 05:52:03 AM »
That's a great summary Barbara, I love to drink broth that has gelled, so delicious on a cold winter day!

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Re: Onion Skin
« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2014, 05:52:03 AM »

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