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Author Topic: A Tribute to Robin Williams  (Read 6181 times)

Jan in Key West

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A Tribute to Robin Williams
« on: August 12, 2014, 03:04:37 PM »
Thousands of beautifically spoken eulogies have monopolized the media today in honor of Robin Williams, a unique talent, a deeply caring activist and a mensch for sure.  Even Dr. D paid tribute on FB saying, "The untimely and tragic death of Robin Williams reminds us of what an awful thing depression can be."


James Taylor wrote, "I felt two things when I got the news last night: first that the light had dimmed and on it's heels, a sense that this was inevitable; that Robin had lived for a long time with a darkness at the periphery of his vision......he was a one-man menagerie.....perhaps there is a price for such brilliance......I'm so sad he's gone and so grateful he left us so much".


While I am sorrowful, my hope is that this tragedy could shed light on the link between diet and mental health. http://www.examiner.com/article/vegan-actor-robbins-williams-health-doing-well


RIP Robin

deanna in AR

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Re: A Tribute to Robin williams
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2014, 03:36:40 PM »
Well said Jan.

Randal

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Re: A Tribute to Robin williams
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2014, 04:04:46 PM »
I grew up with Robin Williams... I was 7 when I watched his first appearance on Happy Days live as it aired. (This was before VCRs and the Internet.) I remember thinking, what the heck are aliens doing on Happy Days, but that guy sure is funny. He's one of those people that everyone liked because he made everyone laugh and feel.

I didn't know he had gone vegan. It's too soon to speculate as to whether that choice had any impact that led to yesterday's event, and of course his addictions had a lot more bearing on his mental health. It's a chicken or the egg situation between Robin's depression and his drug use, but they most certainly exacerbated each other.

But if you know anyone with substance abuse issues, please get them help. If you are a parent, do whatever it takes to keep your kids off drugs.

Rita

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2014, 07:09:24 PM »
I read an interesting book in school, called Potatoes not Prozac.   It deals a lot with alcoholism and sugar cravings.   The person who wrote it was a social worker who dealt with alcoholics.  In her case load, she noticed a commonality of sugar cravings.  She was so interested in learning more about that, that she went back to school to study biochemistry, and then became a doctor.   Now she has a protocol that has a very high success rate.








Randal

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2014, 10:39:00 AM »
Rita, I've been thinking about your post but held off on replying because it hits too close to home.


I broke up with my last girlfriend 5 weeks ago because she had a bad drug problem (as well as being an alcoholic) and I couldn't deal with her behavior anymore. Like Robin Williams, the drug and alcohol abuse was tied into her mental health issues. She has social anxiety and I suspect some depression issue (which might be tied into the fact that her life is unmanageable). I've had a few conversations with friends about Robin Williams, where some people said it was the depression that led him to drugs and suicide, others say the drugs and alcohol led to depression and suicide, whereas I say it's all part of the same thing.


My ex had serious sugar intake as well. (I'm not a biochemist, but as I understand it, alcohol and sugar are closely related chemically and have similar effects on the body.) I thought it was funny when I asked my ex what her favorite food was and she responded candy. She would eat sweets instead of real food for meals. Now I see that it's not just substance abuse and mental health issues that are connected and related, but it's really a triangle that also includes sugar and sugar pre-cursors (which is how I describe carbohydrates).

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2014, 10:51:17 AM »
I have alcoholics and addicts in both immediate and extended family, so I understand the pain here.  I also noticed that along with the chemical cravings were cravings for sugar and carbs.  I only noticed this once I started grain free but it seems clear enough now.  I might have to read that book just mentioned.  I just wish it were possible to just 'get them help' but first they must admit they have a problem.  That's the hardest part.

VibeRadiant

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2014, 01:31:10 PM »
Robin Williams also had Parkinson's disease, so that may have been what led him to suicide.


As an aside, AA meetings have cookies, doughnuts, candy and a lot of sugar and coffee mate for their free coffees. Those that are in recovery basically trade one addiction for another. Quite sad.

Rita

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2014, 02:20:20 PM »
Sorry Randal.  I'm sure that was hard for you to do.   

Randal

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2014, 06:34:38 PM »
The toughest part was not being able to help. If anyone in your life has drug or alcohol dependency issues, I highly recommend going to a 12 step support group. I went to Nar-anon and it helped me understand that there was nothing I could do to help, and it helped me lose those feelings that I could help. (You really can't, until the person wants help.) By being supportive, I was in actuality delaying her recovery (or at least road to it). But it's tough dating someone when you realize you're probably going to attend her funeral sooner rather than later.


Oh yeah, and the obvious advice: don't date people with drug and alcohol problems.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2014, 01:59:08 PM »
> ... my hope is that this tragedy could shed light on the link between diet and mental health.

It won't, for the vegans anyway, because their religion does not permit them to notice cause and effect (much less trends suggesting correlation) when the conclusion might be heretical.

My vague impression is that all the celebrities who have recently died young due to health issues have turned out to be vegans.

If these people went vegan because they thought it was absolute protection, they were obviously mistaken. If they think it edges the odds in their favor, they need to be a bit more mindful of results. It is more likely the case that it's causing, aggravating or at the very least doing nothing to prevent whatever is killing them.

Autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis? Who dies of that? At least one vegan, as it turns out (Harold Ramis).

VibeRadiant

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2014, 09:17:24 AM »
A great video of Robin's time at the Actors Studio.



Randal

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2014, 10:07:52 AM »

Autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis? Who dies of that? At least one vegan, as it turns out (Harold Ramis).

I was looking at a list of famous vegans and vegetarians, and saw Adam Yauch (MCA of the Beastie Boys) on the list. He died at 47 of salivary gland cancer. From what I read, he became a vegan after the diagnosis and initial treatment.

Now of course you could take a list of omnivores and point out numerous celebrities who died young. I can't speculate what caused his cancer, or whether a vegan diet helped or exacerbated his condition. But it does make you wonder when wealthy people with access to the best medical care the world has to offer end up dying from rare diseases, and they practiced certain eating habits.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2014, 06:02:22 PM »
> From what I read, he [cancer victim] became a vegan after the diagnosis and initial treatment.

Odds are that someone fitting that scenario was on SAD to begin with and then went vegan. The SAD provided the petri dish for the cancer to germinate, then fed it. SAD might even have caused it. On the Warburg theory of cancer, switching from SAD to a vegan diet seals their doom.

I was lately reading some papers on keto and exogenous ketones for ALS treatment. In the mouse models, it's showing some promise, but only slows the rate of decay, and doesn't extend lifespan by much, if at all. With any luck, it will be more effective in human trials (and in the meantime, people can do it on their own, as no FDA-embargoed drugs are involved).

With many of these ailments, some of which are real diseases, the key may be prevention. The optimized diet that is effective at prevention may be not-so-effective at arresting, or remission, much less cure. This means that the way to be a cancer/ALS/whatever survivor is to not get it in the first place.

But if you do, choose a dietary therapy very carefully - and know that you are entirely on your own in doing so. Vegan, frankly, would not even be on my list of diets to consider.

We're also on our own in choosing a prevention diet.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: A Tribute to Robin Williams
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2014, 06:02:22 PM »

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