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Author Topic: Wheat-free in Europe  (Read 35957 times)

Redhead65

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Wheat-free in Europe
« on: September 09, 2014, 09:00:28 AM »
Hi, I have not kept a diary for a long time. I hope I will be presistent enough with documenting. For a while (some three weeks) I have been without wheat - inspired by the WB book. At first I felt like I am on withdrawal and figured that this is how an alcoholic must feel. Now it is getting better, because I am beginning to feel the positive effects. I loose weight and I feel more energetic although the latter is not true today. I still feel tired from my journey to Italy (5 week vacation), and it is exhausting to be at school full-time, but I had wanted it.  ;D

In Bologna, where I am staying right now, so far I have to get impression that extremely difficult to eat at a restaurant, but I was pleased that grocery stores offer Kamut flour and Kamut pasta and that bakers offer Kamut bread. The wife of a nearby baker even was very interested in the WB book and wants to know the title in Italian, and another baker's wife, whom I know from last year, apparently has lost a lot of weight. I have to talk with her and find out what she did.

I am staying with an Italian family. I have only booked the nights and no meals, and that is good, because a) they are not much into cooking and b.) when they eat something, it is full of wheat. For diplomatic reasons I did not want to tell them why I am abstaining from wheat. I said "I often have headaches, and I get hunger without limitation and start having a fourth meal in the middle of the night whenever I eat wheat - so my doctor wants me to test whether I fare better without wheat". The husband of the family has a wheat belly, so I did not want to refer to the book.


VibeRadiant

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2014, 09:40:05 AM »
I love your answer for why you abstain from wheat.
Sounds like you are doing very well so far. Keep up the great work.
Wunderbar!

VibeRadiant

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2014, 09:48:30 AM »

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2014, 01:34:46 PM »
Today I found the WB book in Italian, but I do not know whether I want to buy it. I still have time to decide, but my Italian is still basic and there are all these medical terms. Well, I still have time to decide. But the baker's wife was very eager when I told her the title, and I think she will buy it. I had smoked salmon and one piece of Kamut bread for lunch and a small piece of Kamut bread and loads of fresh salad and a bit of pesto for dinner.
The mother of the lady of the house is visiting for one night. She is quite energetic and fit at around 75. We talked about the importance of buying good quality, and she was interested in seeing my microplane grater. I took my microplane grater to Italy.

Thanks for the link - VibeRadiant.



VibeRadiant

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2014, 05:31:39 PM »
Did the microplane raise any eyebrows at the airport?

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2014, 08:56:34 PM »
No, it was in my luggage - not in my hand luggage.

VibeRadiant

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2014, 04:22:58 AM »
That's good.


This reminds me of a time in 1983, when I was working at the Ottawa International airport in security. There were several planes about to take off, including an international one. There was a long line up and this one woman caught my eye. Very garish looking in her long stringy braids with bows at the end, her long purple coat and her black hat, not to mention really bad eyeliner.
I was working the x-ray machine that day looking at the contents of peoples luggage for weapons. This one suitcase comes into view and I see this square metal thing with a cord sticking out. I grab the suitcase to search just as she reached for it.
I say "Excuse me miss, but I'm going to have to search your bag." I open the bag and locate the device and I can't tell what it is. I ask her. She replied "It's a hair crimper.  To crimp hair" Her voice was deep and husky, not a woman, and up close, very evident that this person was not a woman.  I place the item back in the suitcase and off this guy goes with his two companions.
The next day, I am at the mall and who do I see? On the cover of an album? Boy George! I just about died. I had been in his luggage and held his hair crimper.   His two companions were his bandmates.


Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2014, 11:37:29 PM »
Yesterday I had a large salad of grated carrots and zucchini, nuts and a bit of cheese - olive oil and vinegar.
The day before I had a seafood salad.

I counted that even on a lazy day I have to do 1500 stairs.  ;D The emphasis is on "a lazy day". Any extra activites and the number goes up because both the apartment and the school are on the 4th flood, and there is no escalator. And the stairs in that 500 year old house are especially high and massive. At that time there was no standard hight for stairs.
I notice that my heavy breathing is less, and the first week is not even over.

I am definitely not gaining weight here - I am loosing weight. And I eat whenever I want. My confidence in Italian is increasing, and I think while I am here I will probably buy the wheat belly book in Italian.

VibeRadiant

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2014, 04:10:35 AM »
Glad to hear you are doing well from the get go. We should all be so lucky.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2014, 06:05:29 AM »
Redhead,


Stair heights and widths have been essentially the same since Roman times.  You are probably walking on treads that are worn down, making you lift your legs higher.  This is helping you to build muscle and use more energy to climb those steps, so you do lose weight/flab just going up and down. 


Fresh vegetables grown in nutrient rich soils and cooked properly are very nutritious.  Add in pastured animals and their products like eggs and dairy, you get even more nutrition.  Small scale farming can do this.  Farmers there have figured out how to keep their soil enriched naturally.   Surprise, surprise!

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2014, 08:24:54 AM »
Thanks for the feedback.

Where I normally live, there are lots of stairs. Some are 500 steps long. In the hospital a year ago I used to climb up to the nineth floor, take the elevator down to the basement and climb back up. This is how my interest in fitness began. I was the only patient who did not have to wear compression stockings. Do you have to wear those in the US too in hospitals?

I live near a farm, so I usually buy my chicken meat from a farmer. The farmer's wife is an excellent cook and always gives her customers new ideas.

Today I had a granita. This is a free of milk and cream and no artifical stuff added. The granita was with almonds and orange blossoms from sicily.
But honestly two hours later I got hungry again. Well, I knew that, but I could not resist.

Normally at the school all the students get some food from the director on Friday. His wife cooks. Of course it is 80% wheat. I told my teacher that I will not eat because it is wheat (she knows the story about the book and all), so she told me that she would make sure that next Friday there is something wheat-free or with Karmut.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2014, 01:28:17 PM »
Eggs and dairy products are much better here. Today I had a small desert from eggwhites and it was topped with whipped cream from a mountain farm. My gosh - that was the best whipped cream I have ever eaten.

Today I ate at a restaurant for the first time since I am here. I ate grilled meat, salad and a bit of homemade mashed potatoes. The portions in Italy are smaller, because normally you are supposed to order 2 plates. But since I told the waiter that I am not eating wheat, he could not offer me two plates, and I would not have wanted 2 plates anyhow. So that works out perfectly. My day today was not low calorie. I had a grain-free chocolate cake as desert. It was still lukewarm. I had not eaten one like that in a few years. The interesting thing is that when a chocolate cake is grain-free, it does not make you feel full, no matter when you eat it. The first time I had tried this out at a cooking class, and it was close to midnight when we at the chocolate tarts. At that time I thought our cooking teacher must be kidding, but he was right.

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2014, 02:43:07 PM »
What wonderful people you are meeting in Italy.  The food sounds like heaven, too.  I am enjoying reading your posts; it sounds like such a lovely place.  Yes, you would wear compression stockings in the US, if you had poor leg circulation.  Your walking up and down the stairs so much did you a lot of good, so you must not have needed them.  Stairs are great exercise and very good for the circulation.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2014, 11:06:36 PM »
Thanks for your compliments, Lynda.

I used to walk stairs before I came here. In Germany I did not walk the stairs that much every day (for lack of opportuniy (I work on the ground floor, and I live on the first floor), but when I walked the stairs, I would do 2000-3000 upwards. Here I am doing my minimum of 1500 every day, which is of course a lot more.
I know that compared to 9-12 months ago my veins got better. I wear stockings that go up to my knees by the way. (The word "stockings" itself could also mean longer stockings, right?)

Anyway, about 3/4 of a year ago I would not spend a single day without these stockings - otherwise my calfs would swell that much and my legs would hurt. Until yesterday I did not wear stockings for 3 days, and I did not have the slightest problem, and my legs did not swell.  :)
After my vacation I have got an appointment with a reknowned vein specialist. I am anxious to hear what he said.


BarbinNC

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2014, 09:56:36 AM »
I love Italy, spent almost every year there on vacation growing up.  We had a little condo near Venice, in Lignano Sabbiadoro - really lovely country and their way of life is the happiest I've ever come across!


Look forward to all your stories, REd!

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2014, 11:37:35 AM »
I wish one day I could have a small apartment in Italy. But for that my health has to improve and be more stable.

I keep thinking about the fact that one day I should start writing a book. This is not one of the "I would like to be a star writer" fantasies - so - it is more that other people often have said to me that they like my style of writing....or when I tell a story, they say "you are so funny - you should pack this into a book". The good thing is that in the internet age publishing has become more easy, for example self-publishing via Amazon. I just have to wait for my ideas to come back. A well-known writer of women novels from Britain said that one should read novels of other women and to exactly keep an eye on how much has to be described so that a vivid image is created in the mind of a reader. That makes sense. I had never thought of it this way.

Today I went to the market and bought a pendulum and a matching ring. It is some black stone (I am not good at memorizing names of stones - I do not even know the names in German) and silver. An Italian lady started talking with me at a stall where they sold jewellery of lesser quality. She looked like she knew what was good quality, and so I asked her whether she could spare five minutes to accompany me to the stall where I then made the purchase. She also confirmed to me my impression that my choice was a good one.

Today I ate seafood salad again (with kamut bread). The seafood salad was not quite my thing, but at least it was protein.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2014, 12:19:16 PM »
Today I had 2 small pieces of Kamut bread for lunch (with nothing on them). Since my food did not have much volume, it helped keeping my stomach small. If I think about what I ate for dinner - this would not even have been sufficient as a starter half a year ago. I hate some stir-fried bellpeppers and a carrot with some egg whites on top. The veggies were still crunchy when I ate them. And now I am done.

While my Brazilian school friend had lunch and I chewed on my Kamut bread, I told her about the WB approach and told her that the dress I am wearing used to fit tightly. She congratulated me. Needless to say, she is slim like a photo model.

BarbinNC

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2014, 05:54:29 PM »
You're a very good writer, Red!  I look forward to your book.  I'm not sure why you are eating Kamut bread?  Is there something about it you think is beneficial?  I don't think it has anything you need, as far as nutrition, and as a matter of fact, it might be something holding you back from complete health. 


I am going to live vicariously through you in Italy.  I can smell, hear, taste that country, it's my favorite place to be on Earth, and when I was younger,  I always thought I would move there when I retire.  Life had other plans, but I can put myself in that place of mind, and relive the happy times we spent there.


I think Venice must be the most magical place in the World ….

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2014, 07:35:36 PM »
@Barb
I am eating Kamut bread instead of wheat bread, and I eat less bread than before. Once I also for example ate 2 eggs and some nuts or nuts and cheese instead of bread, but while I am in Italy. In this household of other people I have limited space where I can spread my stuff, and also I have to consider that in 2 weeks I have to relocate within Bologna and drag along all the stuff that I posses. I feel a bit overpowered right now being in an new place and trying to practice new habits.
Yesterday for example, when I stir-fried my veggies, I only found 2 clean plates. The dishwasher was still open and full of dirty dishes. I had asked the lady whether I can help empty the dishwasher (when the dishes were clean), but she had said "no thanks, we will do that". On the other hand she does nothing, gives her kids no rules, and then she occasionally freaks out on them (I can hear it thru the wall) as they do nothing. I do not blame them for doing nothing. This household has no structure to give them orientation.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2014, 09:55:28 PM »
Hi Barbara, yesterday I bought sausages made from chicken, and I bought eggs. So this will be my breakfast for the next two days - without bread. I think today in the late afternoon I can reply to your email.

@all
Yesterday I went out to meet some Expats. Only two showed up. We had what the Italians call apperetivo. You go to some place and you buy a drink and then the food is included. The food is not very fancy then of course. Since I did not want to have alcohol, there was lots of sugar in the drink.
At the buffet I picked lentil salad, stirr-fried carrots and chicken. The rest were things I could not eat.

For lunch I went to another baker, and he sells muffins made from spinach, eggs and cheese. Delicious. I ate one, and I promised to come back.  The lady behind the counter was quite surprised that in Germany the Italian bakers only sell bread and no Italian cakes or the like. That is indeed surprising, considering the amount of Italians that live where I live.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2014, 10:14:21 PM »
When I get back to Germany, I will order the 30-min-Wheatbelly Cookbook and maybe also the regular cookbook, and I will try to make more grain-free meals.
I have subscribed to the newletter of coconut mama, and there is a recipe for flat breads from coconut flour. I willl try out those also.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2014, 04:44:33 AM »
Redhead,


Check the recipes on this blog and also do an internet search for "paleo" recipes.  GourmetGirlCooks, NomNomPaleo, Linda'sLowCarbFriends and countless others have developed excellent recipes with adapted ingredients.  Also, Honeyville Farms, where some of us purchase almond flour, will post recipes for baked goods using their almond or other nut flour.  Today they have an apple streusel recipe.  We would further adapt it to use stevia, Swerve or other sugar substitute. 


With time, you learn how to convert many standard recipes to grain and sugar free.   

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2014, 06:45:00 AM »
Thanks, Barbara. Yes, I probably have to get 1-2 new cookbooks so that I can get used to the new life style without having to do conversions at the beginning. I will definitely check out these things.
Before I came to Italy I had ordered coconut oil and coconut pulp from a mill that provides many of the "flours" that are allowed (hazelnut...coconut). So I will order flours from them also.

For tonight I will have mixed salad and chunk of feta. No candy for today.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2014, 12:57:23 PM »
Today I obtained a Paleo book in Italian. My speaking capacity is making progress. I increased my individual lessons in the afternoon from 1.5 - 2 hours.

For dinner I had the previously mentioned insalata and no bread, and I am eating a few nuts now.

The mother of my host (lady) is here again for a visit. Unfortunately she is leaving tomorrow. She is very caring and nice, and she likes to talk with me. (I have a feeling that her daughter not quite likes to talk with me much.) The grandmother had cooked some food and wanted to invite me.  But she had wrapped the food in break crumbs. She apologized but I told her it was no problem. Well, it really was not. I can prepare her food at home and dip the food into coconut flour and grated nuts instead.

I am sure the kids also regret that she is leaving tomorrow. She made them a really nice breakfast today.

Well, I still have tons of homework to do. Today I just ventured into town briefly to buy this book and I tried to find out where I can buy coconut oil. At an organic  perfomery they gave me the address of an organic store outside the town. So just out of curiosity I will probably take an outbus on Saturday and have a look.

When our teacher told me that women here only go to a restaurant alone at daytime - not at night - then I felt we are somehow living in a different time zone here.  ;D

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2014, 02:40:25 PM »
I love your posts, Redhead,  a lovely view into another lifestyle. Who wouldn't miss a grandmother who cooks like that?  Good luck with your new cookbooks.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2014, 12:37:44 PM »
Yeah Linda, you are right. Anybody would miss a grandmother like that. Today the kids look sad again.

Yesterday I had had  a green mixed salad and piece of Feta and had had not been exactly thrifty with olive oil and had added pesto, BUT at night I got so hungry. It was insane. At about 2 a.m. I wanted to get up and eat, but the kitchen is beside my hosts bedroom, and the door was open. So I resisted the temptation. I had a hand full of nuts in my bedromm and at them, but that did not help much. I ended up being awake for about 2 hours from hunger. Needless to say, when I woke up again after 1,5 hours I felt as if I had been tarred. ;-)

Today I had plenty of chicken for dinner, some oilve oil and a different type of pesto and half a slice of bread. I hope I will not wake up again in the middle of the night. Tomorrow I have got a test.

I have done some reading on flax flour, which is so frequently mentioned here in this forum, and it so turns out that the mill from which I get my coconut products also sells that flour (plus all the other nut flours).



Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2014, 01:47:42 PM »
Redhead,


If you have a small coffee grinder, you can easily grind flax seeds.  The seeds should be kept in a refrigerator to delay rancidity.  Once the seeds are ground, they supposedly get rancid fast and also lose their nutrients from the oxidation.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2014, 02:14:02 PM »
I have an expensive coffee grinder that does not stomach things that are oilern than coffee. That mills seels flax seeds ground and sealed in a one-pound-packet. How quickly could I use that up?

The other option I have is I want to buy a high performance blender (one that does 32000 rounds per minute - I don't lknow whether the way I named the blender is the proper term at all), and I have heard that these also turn all kinds of things into four because the knife is so sharp. The knife can even chop up the stone of an avocado. I will further inqure into this when I am in Germany. Then I could grind my flour freshly.


Hopefully I can get coconut oil at the organic store on Saturday. Then I can eat a tablespoon of coconut oil (or less, depending on what I have eaten before) instead of half a slice of bread. I never got up at night from hunger once I had eaten some coconut oil or pulp.
If the coconut pulp has been extracted without using heat, how do you call that process properly? In German we say something like "heat-free extraction".

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2014, 12:56:54 PM »
Today I am having chicken breast and cottage cheese for dinner.
The cottage cheese in Italy tastes better than in Germany. Well, so far everything (except chocolate) tastes better here.

My teacher told a joke to make me laugh and learn with more fun. The joke is politically not correct (at least not for men  :D :D , but my teacher is also female).

BarbinNC

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #29 on: September 21, 2014, 09:46:42 AM »
Hi Red, hope all is well in Bella Italia!


Sounds like you are getting some good food there, I like everything you have been eating, sans the Kamut bread.  But that's just my personal preference, and if it suits you right now, and helps you with efficiency and convenience, while going to school over there, then it should be ok for the time being.  It might be ok in Europe, not really sure, but have to admit I do eat bread when in Germany, and never gain weight or have noticeable problems.  I usually lose weight, because I walk and bicycle so much more.


Look forward to your next report, and description of what's been going on.


Is the school you're going to, mostly to learn Italian?  I don't remember if you wrote about that, but it's my guess.


So, whats the joke?   8)

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #30 on: September 21, 2014, 11:55:06 AM »
 8) 8) My teacher wanted me to revise all the names of the body parts, and so she gave me one of those drawings of a naked man, and there were name tags attached to all the body parts, and I should fill out those tags and learn the words. She suggested me to practice voodoo-learning to have more fun. When I write the words I should imagine that I am sticking a needle into the respective body part. I am planing to start voodoo learning tonight and revise next week before the lesson on Wednesday. 

Saturday I had an excellent seafood salad in some food hall (where you can find all kinds of restaurants unter one roof. You order from the counters along both sides and then sit at a woorden table in the middle of the hall. The seafood was excellent, and it was with baby rocket salad, small tomatoes, garlic, olives. Next week I am going there again.

The school's purpose is exclusively to learn Italian.

Yesterday I did quite well with only protein in the evening (a chicken breast and a piece of cheese), but today I made a bad choice for lunch. I had always been curious to know how gluten-free pizza tastes, so I went to a café where they proudly announce to offer gluten-free pizza. It was a smaller piece, like half a German breakfast plate. I am ashamed to admit that I ate it althought it tasted horrible. And I was not even super hungry. I have no excuse.  :(
On the positive side: now when I think of pizza I think "yucks, no thanks".

Today I went to visit the Medieval Museum. I also took some nice photos. Overall the museum had interesting objects on display, but there was a heavy emphasis on death an fighting.  40% of the display object were beautifully ornamented marble coffins. But even I could only see so and so many coffins.  I found it intersting, however, that between 1400 and 1600 it was quite common to build prestigeous coffins for reknowned professors. The more prestige the professor had had, the more ornaments were on the coffin. They showed for example how he was giving a lecture.
Since Bologna has the oldest university of Europe, a lot of display items in any museum frequently have something to do with the university.

BarbinNC

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #31 on: September 21, 2014, 04:12:46 PM »
Haha, that is very funny indeed, and I hope you enjoyed your homework assignment.   8)


Was it like a German Food hall, like we had in Augsburg, you had all the butchers lined up along the wall, and could go from one to the other and stand up eating places in the middle.  Loved my Leberkaes Semmel … after a day of shopping.  :D


That even turned me off to Pizza, although I love the home made wheat free one I make.  YUM!!


And I'm a love of all things Medieval.  Envious of that Museum visit, wish I could have been with you!!


 ;D

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2014, 06:00:15 AM »
Yes, it sounds like the foodhall you describe.

If you have whatsapp, I could send you some photos. I do not have the patience to transfer them to my email account, all the more because it sometimes takes two days till the photos arrive in my email. Just a thought. Otherwise you could also google Bologna Museo Medievale and hope for some pictures.

Yes, I did my first round of voodoo today. Need to revise tomorow. Today I decided not to go to school and to study instead. It works great so far. Yesterday my plan had been to go out for a bit and to study then. I had already not studied on Saturday, and I do not want to pay for the individual tuition (on 3 afternoons) for nothing. But yesterday I exhausted myself too much, and when I came home, I was too tired to put my brain to work and too awake to get sleep. This morning I realized it is pointless that I go to school totally unprepared.

On some days I can walk and walk for 9 or 10 hours, and I am fine, but yesteray 4-5 hours were too much for me. I wonder whether other people also do not always react the same way to physical stress.

Today I ate cucumber and tomato pieces and 200 g of Camembert (= cheese). I am still hungry, so I took half a litre of milk out of the fridge and will drink that soon. I need to buy more groceries tonight.

Tomorrow night I will probably not go to that event where I went last Tuesday and where I had run into these 2 gay guys. For the next meeting only 4 people have signed up, those two again, the group organizer (who had not had the decency to reply to my message - if she does not want to accept people into her group who do not live here permanently, that is fine, but at least she should state that) and one other guy.


BarbinNC

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #33 on: September 22, 2014, 07:03:56 AM »
I looked up the museum and it looks quite interesting.  I've been to quite a few, one of my favorites is the Cluny in Paris.  And surprisingly well done also the Cloisters in New York. 


I don't have whatsapp, and will take your word for it.  Maybe when you're back in Germany, you will be able to do a blog about your travels, that would be fun. ;)


My daughter was talking last night about doing a blog together, just a mother/daughter blog about cooking and baking low carb high fat, including baby food, and misc. other subjects like decorating.  She started one a while back, when Hudson was born, but then never got back to it, too much going on.  But she's an excellent writer too, and I loved the few posts she made.


Not sure why you ran out of energy, might have something to do with not eating your Kamut…  ;D   But you might just be tired, you do seem to walk a lot every day, so many your body just said "give me a rest already!"…  The only thing I can think of is to add more fat … what's your philosophy on that?


Hope you enjoy your study day, I'm waiting for the workmen to arrive, they are already 3 minutes late, haha!~

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2014, 01:19:50 PM »
I have thought about blogging, but i do not know any topic right now. If it is only a travel blog, it will not get much food. The most I can afford is travelling once a year. I used to do really exotic trips up to 4 years ago or so (I have travelled wearing a veil, and I have done a lot of backpacking), but that was when the economy was better.

Today I moved to the shared apartment. The school was not very reliable in giving the key to me, so I spent one extra night at the Italian family's house. They were very nice and helpful and even wanted to help me transport my luggage. But I declined (I saw they were very busy preparing for the arrival of the next student). In Germany I would have taken a cab, but here the cab drivers are not very helpful. They do not even lift the luggage into the trunk. When I arrived here, he opened the trunk and made a guesture like "put your stuff in there". I wanted to slain him. I guestured that I cannot. So he did it for me, but you should have seen his face. S**** him.

My shared apartment is at a very noisy road. I have only met 2 inhabitans so far. One is a mexican girl. She is really nice. We talked for two hours. The other is from my class. She is Australian. We do not talk that much.

The advantage is that here in the apartment I can decide how often I do my laundry. I prefer to wash my towels hot. The host family did not seem to do that, and she kind of signalled to me that it is not necessary. So I got the message and did not want to start a discussion.

Today I had an ice cream for lunch and practically only protein for breakfast and dinner. I told the guy in the ice cream parlor that ever since I have eaten his ice cream I have stopped eating ice cream in Germany.

Here in the apartment everybody seems to keep his stuff in his own place. Some people have oil and food in the ktichen, but when the Mexican girl told me she keeps her oil in her room, i got the idea that she was not saying that for no reason. One guy from my class (American) was complaining last week that someone ate his food. I have not found out yet whether he also lives here. If he does, then the total picture makes sense.

I did some more reading about gluten-free live. I did not realize that buckwheat is no wheat, and many people seem to make bread from it or even cake. I will give it a try.


Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2014, 10:24:21 PM »
The last days in Italy were very busy for me. Somehow I think I when I do this next time, I will plan one week without lessons so that I can go and see places also.
In that shared apartment many things did not function but the owner (= the language school owner) did not care. She only wanted to earn money. But after a few days at least some more open students moved in, and we began to talk and play card games or whatever and had fun. An Israeli also moved in. We really got along well, and on my last day in the apartment he got up when I had to take a taxi and he helped me shovel my baggage downstairs. That was very kind of him, considering that he had only slept for four hours.  :)

Regarding food I even managed to do 4 grain-free days, but on my first night in Germany (I arrived very late, the fridge was empty and the stores closed) i had a sausage (type Frankfurter) and a wheat bun at the gas station. I admit I did not have the consistency to order two portions of sausage and to cut out the wheat.

But the past two days (which were also my first days at work) I have been wheat-free. Yesterday I came home and was starved, and I ate nuts, a bit of salami and cheese and two eggs. Then I stir-fried mixed vegetables in coconut oil. I will take that with me to work today and eat  everything with sausage.
On both working days I had many temptations, but I was very consistent and said "no thanks, I am not eating wheat".
I am surprised that nobody asked why!!
Two colleagues (female), who really care for me, said "You have lost weight nicely. That is increadible. How did you manage that in Italy?".

Two days ago I went to the whole food store after work and I bought lots of protein sources and two types of vegetables. I want to make more trips to the store now just to buy vegetables. They should not sit in my fridge for a week.

Yesterday I went to Aldi's. I had not been there since I stopped eating wheat. There were a number of things that I used to buy regularly. I read all the labels (I am really consistent about that now!!!), and it was......I am sure, you can guess.....wheat, wheat, wheat. So I thought "okay, that saves a lot of time. I am out of here. So I just bought some organic smoked salmon and left. I did not feel I had to miss out on something - I felt I had saved time.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #36 on: October 15, 2014, 07:22:08 AM »
Redhead,


As you continue this way of eating that you will spend less time and money in supermarkets because most of the products sold contain wheat, high fructose corn syrup, sugar, poor quality oils and numerous other undesirable  or unnamed ingredients.  While your marketplaces are different than here in the United States, the search for "clean" fresh food is ongoing.  Pastured meats, range free chickens, organic vegetables and minimally pasteurized or raw dairy products are becoming increasingly available here.  You will notice that even if you are paying a premium price for your food, your other expenses for health related items goes way down and you just don't eat in restaurants as much or buy expensive, already prepared foods because you aren't sure of the ingredients and your home cooking tastes better anyway.  The biggest  improvement is that you actually do have the energy to prepare a healthy meal for yourself!

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #37 on: October 15, 2014, 11:39:00 PM »
You are right.
By the way, I hope to be able to reply to your email on Sunday. Saturday I am at a training course all day. I had completely forgotten about that. Normally it is a bit too much for me directly after my vacation, but "efficient reading techniques" is an important subject.

This morning I discovered some cereal bars and tossed them out.

Yesterday I was not so satisfied with my eating. I had my home-prepared veggies with a generous helping of coconut oil, one egg and one avocado, but after 2 hours I was hungry again, had nothing available at work. After work I went to the organic store, and I had a piece of organic wheat-free cheesecake.  I was dying of hunger, but that was not a good choice. The interesting thing was, however, that I considered this cake "too sweet". It was less sweet than commercial cheesecake. But I thought "yucks, and this is what I used to like". My taste buds seem to change. Two months ago I would not have thought that this is possible.

I need different ideas for breakfast, and I have done some reading. This is why I am still home instead of getting ready for work. The link www.urgeschmack.de might also be interesting for you, Barbara.

At work somebody brought me chocolate. He meant well, so I thanked him politely.  One of the two chocolate bars contained cookie crumbles (Kekskrümel?). I have a very young and slim colleague. She loves chocolate, and she knows why I am not eating wheat (she still keeps eating wheat), so I asked her whether she wanted the chocolate. She was delighted.
Later I had a guilty conscience for having offered the chocolate to her. If someone had offered me cigarettes as a gift, I would have refused the cigarettes and would never have offered them to somebody else. Maybe I should have mentioned something to the colleague...........
Today I will say to him that the chocolate was very good and that a friend helped me eat the chocolate, because one bar contained cookie crumbles and I do not eat wheat.


Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2014, 06:14:58 AM »
> At work somebody brought me chocolate. He meant well ...

As you may be aware, chocolate per se is not a problem in modest quantities. The issue is the sweetener (and as you are aware, the other junk food junk many candies have).

Sugar is acceptably low at 80% cacao and above, with small portion sizes.

Bars and chips with safe alternative sweeteners (such as stevia, Lily's brand in the US) are OK at larger portion sizes, as long as you're getting enough Omega 3 DHA/EPA in the rest of your diet.

It's even possible to make a safe cookie crumb chocolate bar - Quest does with their Cookie's&Creme flavor. Very low net carb, gluten free, wheat-free.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #39 on: October 17, 2014, 12:15:19 PM »
@Boundless
Yes, I am aware of that. But thanks for reminding me. I have some first class 85% Swiss Chocolate at home. The chocolate my colleague gave me was with a high sugar content, and the piece I gave to my colleague contained wheat cookie crumbles.

@all
The past two days my meal management has been better.. I managed to eat low carb.  Today I was really hungry in the late afternoon, but I managed to control myself. I ate a hand full of nuts before I started my way home. I told myself that now it is a new chapter in my life, and stuffing everyhing into my mouth that comes to my mind does not work. In the end I felt good about having won.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #40 on: October 21, 2014, 01:30:44 PM »
 :( Today I am not so happy with my attempts to cook. I cooked for the first time with lupine flour and with coconut flour. I tried to make pancakes with coconut milk. The pancakes fell apart. Okay, technically it could be that because of no glutine nothing sticks, but I have seen recipes of glutenfree pancakes and they looked proper. Maybe I shoudl have at least invested the time to look for a recipe, but I had thought "well, you know how to make pancakes with wheat, so how hard can the new challenge be?". I had put coconut oil into the pan. The amazing thing, however, is, that the result now looks like vegan scrambled eggs and does not even taste bad. I had added some organic spice.

But I tell you....for those who have not tried it yet.....lupine flour tastes terrible (by itself).

Today I wanted to order the 30 min. or less cookbook. The bookstore had discouraging news. They said it will take at least three weeks, and they cannot tell me the price. That is ridiculous. I am going to contact amazon Germany tomorrow. I want a proper book (no ebook).
Amazon can deliver I think in 3-4 days, but my German bookstore told me that there is a new edition coming up. I could not verify this online, but I do not want that Amazon sells me a soon outdated version.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2014, 06:22:39 AM »
On Friday I was off work in the forenoon, and so I went to a farmer and bought raw milk and made yoghurt from part of that milk, and I bought butter which had been produced three days before. I discovered another farm store nearby that has a fantastic selection of vegetables. This is probably not the last time I went shopping there.

Last night I went out. I met a meetup group at a restaurant. It was the first time for me. I want to socialize more. Does anybody here have experience with meetup? We were about 10 people and had a great time talking until the restaurant closed. The restaurant only had pasta from wheat !!!. amd they had no idea of what was in the dressings. They were not even embarrassed that they had no idea. So I decided to not eat. I had kind of expected something like that and had eaten half a trout and a vegetable omelette at home.

Today my washer made me nervous. It refused to pump. I opened the pump and found some hair in it. I think I need to check the pump at regular intervals. After all I have long hair and it gets stuck on clothing. I am really happy that the machine is working again now.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #42 on: November 03, 2014, 10:42:45 PM »
Today and yesterday I am at a training course at my employer's own training center. Yesterday I did not manage to prepare a meal, so I just had an apple for lunch, and I did accompany the others (eating wheat). The food at the cafeteria was either clearly with wheat or the ingredients were not listed -  so I decided not to take a risk. At our salad bar I can sometimes not even be sure whether they have poured some ready-made sauce on top of it.

Today I had two buckwheat pancakes (containing eggs) for breakfast and the training is only till lunch time, so I will eat when I get home.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #43 on: November 03, 2014, 11:00:24 PM »
I forgot to mention something. Last week I ran into a colleague from a different department. We had not talked for months. He has a Turkish immigrant background, and we used to talk occoasionally, and he used to correct my errors (mistakes?). He told me that his wife now has multiple sclerosis. The couple is maximum 32, and they have two small kids. A real tragedy. I told him about the WB book. He speaks German perfectly, his wife not so, but fortunately the WB book has been translated into Turkish and can be ordered from a local bookstore. He found this quite interesting and said he would tell his wife about it. He even had heard about the term "gluten" because their kids have a friend with a gluten allergy.

I don't know whether he just said he found this interesting in order to be polite. That is not in my hands. But I at least wanted to have mentioned the topic.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #44 on: November 05, 2014, 01:07:38 PM »
Today I had to resist quite some temptation. When I entered my second office, there was a party going on with 9 cakes and 6 types of pizza all with wheat. I was sooo hungry, but I had prepared some chicken and mixed vegetables, and so I ate that. But I did not eat it in the kitchen where pizza and cake were found - I ate my lunch at my desk - far away enough from the smell. Breakfast had been 6 hours ago, and so I was hungry, but there was no way I would have given in.

Yesterday a sales girl at a bookstore bought the WB book based on what I said. We talked quite a bit.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #45 on: November 05, 2014, 01:44:50 PM »
Redhead,


Terrific move!  Avoiding all the temptations is really important.  The longer you are grain and sugar free, the less you are tempted.  Your tastebuds change and none of the formerly favorite foods really taste good to you and you wonder how you ever really ate that "stuff".

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #46 on: November 05, 2014, 11:04:42 PM »
I already now notice that my taste buds change, and in town I can pass pizza places without even raising an eye brow, but yesterday was the first time that I felt tempted (BUT I must also say that I was starved). Is it normal that temptations can come up in isolated instances? (versus all the time)
When I was eating wheat, I always felt tempted by everything.

Yesterday I cooked 4 small portions of quinoa, used one and deep-froze 3.
I cooked a porton of veggies and a huge piece of salmon, so I am all set for today.

My daughter landed in Thailand today. She sent me a picture of the Wheatbelly book. I have yet to find out whether it is her travel compagnion's. Either that or she bought the book at the airport, because we had just started chatting about this and she had said "maybe I should also buy that book when I get back from Thailand".

Have you heard of Hugendubel? Next time you get to Germany, you should check out one of their stores. They have red sofas in the store, and one sofa is even for lying down...but in a way that you still sit half-way, and you can but your legs up in a way that any doctor for vene problems would be delighted. I was trying to find a picture but could not.

Rita

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HungryinTN

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #48 on: November 06, 2014, 12:54:47 PM »
If my experience is any example, I'd say occasional cravings are normal!  Mine come from three sources - A)waiting too long to eat, B) too much booze, or C)too much stress.  I am having a major attack today because of a spike in my stress level.  I just seem to be hitting roadblock after roadblock right now, professionally and financially, and it's just made me feel very discouraged in general.  So I'd say if you were starving, that's a reasonable trigger.  It's helpful to acknowledge those cravings and think about their root cause and then decide whether there is something that you need to take care of.  Sometimes, when all else fails and there's nothing else to do, I'll give in to a craving, but NEVER to wheat, and I find that I can usually get right back on track right away.  It's different for ever situation and for every body, though, I imagine.  Then again, I'm not exactly a shining example these days, as I've been stuck at my "set point" weight for about six months with about 20-30 more pounds left to lose.

Redhead65

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Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #49 on: November 06, 2014, 01:31:50 PM »
@Rita
Yes, exactly!!!

@HungryinTexas
I will post later. I am hungry right now.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Wheat-free in Europe
« Reply #49 on: November 06, 2014, 01:31:50 PM »

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