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Author Topic: spiralized food  (Read 6262 times)

Barbara from New Jersey

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spiralized food
« on: October 17, 2014, 12:19:35 PM »
I just came across a blog that discusses spiralized food, has recipes and techniques.  Very interesting and excellent to expand your menu.  Google "inspiralized" for the blog.  I can't seem to get the link to work right. http://www.inspiralized.com/

Linda R

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2014, 04:49:28 PM »
http://www.inspiralized.com/




This seems to be working..........................

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2014, 06:05:42 PM »
Thanks Linda!  I got the link to work after several tries.  Don't know why I  have so much trouble with this. 

Redhead65

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2014, 12:30:45 PM »
I am intrigued by how pretty the stuff looks. On Amazon I found a food spiralizer which does not even take up much room. (I have to watch that point a bit as I do not have much space in the kitchen.) Some people even make spaghetti out of zucchinis.

Redhead65

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2014, 01:22:30 AM »
I finally bought a spiralizer yesterday. It is an improved version. The gap between the blade and the plastic can be modified - at least on one of the blades. This is a youtube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rh3F3rS7k_U
It is in German, but you can see what it does.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2014, 03:11:39 AM »
Redhead,

I just love my Spiralizer.  When I use zucchini, I will make it in advance and salt it a bit, then let it drain onto paper towels in refrigerator for a few hours, or I will wrap them log like and squeeze the water out.  I then saute in a hot pan using ghee, butter or oil and season to taste.

You will be happy with your choice.  There are many recipes I've found on line for squash and root veggies which cannot be readily made with the smaller hand held ones.  I will add some cooked meat or fish on top or stir fry this as well.  This gizmo sure increased my vegetable intake.

Redhead65

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2014, 03:51:22 AM »
Hi Barbara, thanks for the feedback.  I had to look up what gizmo means.  8) I am always glad to learn new words.
I had looked at a small spiralizer also, but I soon realized that this is not getting me anywere, and it costs half the price of a big one.
The salesgirl from whom I have bought the spiralizer told me a funny thing. She said at the beginning she did not realize that the entire vegetable is spiralized in one piece, and then she had guests, and all the spirals were in a salad bowl, and someone tried to take out some spiralized salad, and he did not find the end.  ;D
It was good that she mentioned that because I had assumed that the spirals automatically break of from time to time (at irregular intervals). She said she sometimes prepares vegetable noodles with a sauce of cream and shrimps.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2014, 05:31:06 AM »
Redhead,

There are lots and lots of recipes on line for spiralized veggies.  Yes, you do need to cut the strands into more manageable pieces.  Any sauce you would have used on pasta can be used on the spiralized  vegetables.  There are endless variations and combinations.  These can be roasted, stir fried or eaten raw and combined with other veggies.  Danielle Walker combines white sweet potato, stir fried in ghee with sauteed broccoli rabe and garlic then mixed with pesto. S&P to taste.  Some people blanch broccoli rabe in boiling water to remove some of the bitterness before cooking in fry pan.  Letting potato sit in 1/2 hour in ice water will remove some of the starch, then your drain and dry before stir frying.  I had parsnips and carrots stir fried in ghee with dill and this was delicious!  The small spiralized pieces seem to blend their flavors better then larger ones.

Seared scallops or any cooked fish is delicious with this.  Use your imagination as you become more familiar with the flavors of spiralized veggies.

Lila

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2014, 12:57:34 PM »
You all inspired me to buy a spiralizer. It arrived last week and I will do spaghetti zucchini tonight! I am making a sauce with some left over roast beef, mushrooms, celery, some onions. It will be yummy!

Redhead65

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2014, 01:06:23 PM »
@Lila
Which one did you buy?

@Barbara
Sorry, I forgot to thank you for the detailed feedback. I do not like potatoes - so the starch in them is no danger for me.  :D
When you put beetroots into the spiralizer - do you precook them a little? The salesgirl said she whould completely cook them. That seens strange to me.  I would be worried to have mashed beetroots in the end.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2014, 01:39:49 PM »
Lila and Redhead,


I let zucchini "noodles" drain or squeeze them in paper towels.  Then I stir fry in a hot pan with ghee, butter or oil just until the noodles are starting to brown, but not release liquid.  Sometimes I have minced garlic, onion and similar in the oil.


With beets, turnips and rutabagas, I will wash, cut the ends off, peel and then spiralize raw.  Then I either roast in the oven (toss with oil, S & P) for about 10 minutes or stir fry.  Same with squash.  If you cook these first, then they are too mushy to spiralize. 

ldyrdr4311

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2014, 12:17:24 PM »
After reading Barbara from NJ comment about cutting the spiralized veggies into more manageable pieces, I had a thought. Wouldn't julienned vegetables be able to be used in much the same manner? I have a mandolin(e) with a julienne blade (haven't used that yet). Trying to stay away from purchasing more gadgets as space is getting rather limited in the kitchen.

Anyone try doing it this way?

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2014, 01:03:17 PM »
Yes, that would work just fine.  The idea is to get long thinned julienned type shreds of the vegetable.  Your outcome will be straighter than using a spiral type tool but should work just as fine.  I'm guessing that the ideal length is about 6".

Redhead65

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2014, 10:50:15 PM »
I had to look up what is a julienne blade. That looks interesting.

Barbara, today I am going to the farm store to buy veggies. I hope she will have beetroots. I do want to have lilac colored spaghetties.  ;D

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2014, 01:21:21 PM »
I finally had some spaghetti squash the other day, courtasy of my son.  The restaurant put an odd vinaigrette on it but it had a mild flavor and a nice 'tooth' (as they used to say).  I really liked it.  I guess I am going to be forced to get into the veggies as noodles movement.  :)   I can envision these being very nice with shrimp and garlic sauce, or Alfredo.  Got to recheck all the recipes everyone has put on here.  You folks are more creative than I am in the kitchen.

ldyrdr4311

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2014, 10:21:53 AM »
Lynda (Fl): Oh my gosh, I just love spaghetti squash! Will even eat it w/o a sauce on it. It's tasty with butter & garlic salt on it.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2014, 10:47:41 AM »
Ladies,


A whole new vegetable experience has opened up for you!  I'm really loving all my spiralized veggies and eating a lot more of them as well!  Any recipe for a gratin type dish can be made with root veggies that are spiralized.  The cream sauce coats the strands.  The root veggies stir fried in a bit of coconut oil just adds flavor to the sauce.  Add a small amount of fish or shrimp or meat and you have a low carb, tasty and filling meal. 




Lila

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2014, 11:25:37 AM »
I'm a little behind in reading. I also have a julienne peeler but bought a spiralizer hoping that it would minimize waste. It doesn't. The part you can't spiralize is just a different shape.


I did some carrots to put in my zucchini spaghetti. Very tasty. But you can't spiralize all of the vegetable.


We don't even miss pasta anymore.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2014, 12:39:49 PM »
Lila,

I just eat the middle core while I'm preparing the meal or I add it to the spiralized mix.  The only waste is both ends and peel which you would cut off anyway.

I found that it was too hard on my wrist to spiralize more than 3 zucchini using my Gefu.  Root vegetables were mostly too hard to do and there was much more waste than using the Paderno.  I would usually scrape my fingers or knuckles using the mandoline.  I just cut up a rutabaga to spiralize and then stir fried it in butter.  I let it steam using a lid for about 2 minutes.  This was simple and easy because I just had to peel it and make 1 cut so it would fit the blade size.  I cut the core up and the little bit left on the spindle.  Very easy.  Salt, pepper and garlic are my main spices, but you can use any that you like.

I'm using asparagus, green, red and yellow peppers, mushrooms and the like on top of the veggie noodles in addition to my meat or fish.  Now 2/3 of my plate are vegetables.  Sometimes I add a bit of cabbage.  Everything seems to blend together nicely, just tossed with oil or bacon fat or ghee and heated slightly.  Even squash tastes good spiralized instead of a heavy mash.

I'm finding that the root vegetables are not giving me any digestive problems when eaten with an animal protein.  Potatoes are too starchy for me to digest with meat so I don't eat them with meats, even in condiment sizes.  I hardly eat them at all trying to stay low carb.  While the root veggies have higher carbs than greens, they are a winter food and seem to warm me up nicely.  The extra carbs feel like a comfort food in the cold weather. 

I would never even attempt to julienne most of these vegetables and cutting them into matchsticks is just too troublesome for me to bother with. I am not a trained chef and my knife skills are self taught.   This is why I really like the sprializer and feel it is worth the money and the space it takes up.  No scraped knuckles either!

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: spiralized food
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2014, 09:01:28 AM »
Gourmet Girl Cooks has posted her method of preparing Zoodles.  This would apply to any spiralized vegetable that has a water content.  She place several layers of paper towels on a tray.  Places the zoodles on top.  Sprinkles with a small amount of salt (1/4-1/2 tsp).  Places more towels on top.  She lts it sit for at least 20 minutes, but an hour is better.  She rolls the towels to squeeze out more water.  Then she places the zoodles in a hot fry pan with a splash of oil, ghee or butter and stir fries until lightly browned. 

She makes sure her sauces are not watery and will cook them a bit to remove any excess liquid. 

My personal additions are to saute chopped garlic and/or onion until golden and then add the zoodles.  This works nicely with nearly any vegetable. 
i will also add favorite savory spices at that time.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: spiralized food
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2014, 09:01:28 AM »

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