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Author Topic: Eating in Hawaii  (Read 2331 times)

Lila

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Eating in Hawaii
« on: December 27, 2014, 08:40:11 AM »
Just returned from an awesome Christmas break in Hawaii. Went to Maui, Kauai and spent a couple of leisurely days in Honolulu. Just an excellent adventure.


We stayed in condos except for the hotel in Honolulu, so it was easy for us to prepare meals. We generally fixed breakfasts and dinner (usually a salad because we ate a larger lunch) and ate one meal out. It can be a challenge to eat -- surprisingly Hawaiian folks don't eat very healthy foods. Lots of starch (potatoes, rice, taro) and processed meats like spam. But every restaurant we went to had grass fed beef, free range chicken (lots of free range chickens in Hawaii, especially Kauai), and delicious roasted pork. So we did a good job most days, with slip ups having more to do with happy hour drinks like Mai Tai than actual food. Had fish a couple of times, but it was not outstanding.


One of the best meals, surprisingly, we had was something we took on the plane Christmas Day from the Lahaina Chicken place in the Honolulu airport. Roasted chicken & pork and three sides: got double serving of a wax & green bean mixture (really cooked well--crispy!!), mixed greens. Fairly inexpensive ($14) for the huge serving and DH and I shared it over the Pacific. Really outstanding.


Didn't gain any weight!! Now to get back to the gym.


Hope everyone had a great Christmas!

Rita

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2014, 09:31:48 AM »
Thanks Lila.  Sounds like a wonderful trip!!   That's amazing that every restaurant you went to had such high quality foods.

Redhead65

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2014, 09:54:27 AM »
Lucky you were able to go to Hawaii. How nice. I am happy for you. Have been there myself and hope to go back. The food was beautifully decorated with flowers. I still remember the Hawaii papaya, which is the best in the world (in my opinion). I know they are not WB compliant, but I liked them a lot at that time.

Janknitz

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2014, 09:45:10 PM »
We lived on the Big Island for a few years, and the standard local diet is terrible. BUT, there's a lot of good food there if you look around. There was a big campaign when we lived there to encourage people to return to their ancestral diets which are much healthier than plate lunch (bbq meat, often breaded, with 2 scoops of white rice and a big scoop of macaroni salad) spam musubi (spam in a sweet sauce on top of rice), and noodles in every form imaginable.

If you go to the fish counter of any market you'll be amazed at the varieties of very fresh fish and sea vegetables. Pork is abundant (if you eat it), fresh local veggies too. You have to be adventurous because you may not be familiar with things like fiddlehead ferns and Goya (bitter melon), but they are worth a try.

We love the dark meat of chicken, and they must send it to Hawaii because Hawaiians do too. And the beef is outstanding, though expensive.

Randal

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2014, 09:51:53 PM »
I remember when I was in Hawaii for Y2K (hey, if society is going to collapse, I want to be in paradise when it happens) and seeing the high obesity levels in the native population. It didn't make sense, since I assumed they spent a lot of time outside and swimming. But it just goes to show that exercise truly has little effect on one's weight.


Did you eat poi? I don't understand how something tasteless can taste so bad.

Lila

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2014, 11:13:55 AM »
No, I didn't eat poi although I had opportunity. Looks like paste. bleh


At one restaurant where we requested that the starches be left off our meals, the server said that more Hawaiians need to leave off the rice and macaroni salad. I think it is the only place I've been where the beach and dress shops advertised "plus sizes available."

Randal

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2014, 01:43:26 PM »
We've been deceived into thinking that rice and potatoes (and of course, whole grains) are good for us, and that fruits and vegetables are equivalent.


I remember eating with my niece and nephew, and all my relatives telling them they can't have this snack or that unless they eat a piece of fruit first, and inside I'm just screaming "NOOOOOOO!"

Janknitz

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2014, 06:18:45 PM »
Quote
It didn't make sense, since I assumed they spent a lot of time outside and swimming. But it just goes to show that exercise truly has little effect on one's weight.

I think we like to imagine it would be like that in Hawaii, but that's not the reality for most people.  The cost of living is very high, so most people work hard, long hours.  The unemployment levels are high because of geographic isolation and limited industry, but the unemployed there are just like anywhere else--often depressed, inactive with poor diets, high drug use (mostly meth).  Junk food is abundant and less expensive than imported food, so that's what people tend to eat.  All that great grassfed meat and Hawaii produce isn't really priced affordably for locals to buy.

We never saw a fresh pineapple, for example, except for a very limited time of the year when local farmers had white pineapples (very sweet!).  Most of the pineapples are grown in corporate farms on other islands and then shipped to the mainland.  The local Safeway received pineapples from Maui that had first gone to California and then came back to be sold in grocery stores on the islands--overripe and priced to cover the cost of  all that ridiculous transportation.  Eggs produced right there on the island cost more than the ones shipped from the mainland.  The only things that were less expensive there were fresh papaya (ubiquitous on the Big Island), guava, and breadfruit.

At the time we lived there (early 90's), staples (not low carb staples, obviously) like cereal, milk, bread, fresh veggies, and meat cost 2 -3 times what they did on the mainland.  It took me a while to find a job in my profession there, and when I did it paid about 1/3 less than my lowest beginning salary on the mainland 10 years earlier.  So I, as most people I knew, worked two or more jobs to make ends meet.  No time for the beach!

It was a beautiful place to live, the people were wonderful, and it was fun discovering and learning about the many cultures that make up the island.  But very hard to be financially sustainable there--dietary or otherwise. 

Lila

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2014, 07:06:41 PM »
I don't know how people afford to live there. Just going to the Safeway for basic food (eggs, salad, etc.) was very expensive. It was amazing that our lodging was very inexpensive by mainland standards. Except in Honolulu, the condos we rented were under $90. But even in Honolulu the room where we stayed near Waikiki was significantly less than what one would have to pay for a room in midtown Atlanta.


I'm not sure I'd like to live there--after I'd done everything on the island I would probably feel very isolated. It is truly beautiful, though, and I enjoyed every second we were there!

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Re: Eating in Hawaii
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2014, 07:06:41 PM »

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