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Author Topic: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?  (Read 2056 times)

Linda R

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Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« on: February 06, 2015, 10:32:26 AM »
"Americans love pork. But they'd probably think twice about biting into that slice of bacon or Spam sandwich if they knew about the U.S. Department of Agriculture's high-speed slaughter program. Fortunately, a few brave USDA meat inspectors have come forward to let folks know what's really going on in some pork plants across the country. Based on what they say, it's time to slow things down.


Under the Department of Agriculture's high-speed inspection program, pigs are moving down the processing lines at 1,300 hogs per hour! That's really fast when you consider each pig weighs about 250 pounds. It's so fast that USDA inspectors are coming forward with concerns, specifically about contamination. And by contamination, picture things like hair, toenails, feces, cystic kidneys, etc. What's alarming is that whistleblowing inspectors report that this contamination is routinely missed by inspection and ending up at your grocery store or McDonald's.


How can an inspector possibly check for problems when processing lines are zooming at such speeds? Answer: they can't."




http://www.huffingtonpost.com/food-integrity-campaign/bacon-now-with-toenails-usda-inspectors-blow-the-whistle-on-pork-program_b_6623994.html

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2015, 12:00:19 PM »
Linda,

That is 2.66 pigs  per minute!!!  Less than 30 seconds per pig!!! 
It just isn't reasonable to think that an inspection at these speeds will have merit.  How can the government even permit this "experiment?  It certainly is not for the public's benefit.  After reading Upton Sinclair's expose' of the meat packing industry in his book, The Jungle, President Teddy Roosevelt formed a government agency in 1906 which has now become the FDA. 

Despite regulations and guidelines in the 109 years since then, seems that not much has changed.  Not only do we have sick animals eating chemical and drug laden food, confined to small spaces and standing in their own feces, but now they aren't even inspected beyond a cursory high speed viewing. 

Several local grocery stores keep selling out of their organic milk, placing a sign on the empty shelves that demand is outpacing supply.   With more disclosures like the sham meat inspections, you can bet that pasture  and humanely raised meats and poultry will become much more in demand and be reasonably priced.  The FDA keeps losing prestige and has shamefully become a puppet for the industry.  President Roosevelt must be turning over in his grave.

Linda R

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2015, 12:39:42 PM »
Linda,

That is 2.66 pigs  per minute!!!  Less than 30 seconds per pig!!! 
It just isn't reasonable to think that an inspection at these speeds will have merit.  How can the government even permit this "experiment?  It certainly is not for the public's benefit.  After reading Upton Sinclair's expose' of the meat packing industry in his book, The Jungle, President Teddy Roosevelt formed a government agency in 1906 which has now become the FDA. 

Despite regulations and guidelines in the 109 years since then, seems that not much has changed.  Not only do we have sick animals eating chemical and drug laden food, confined to small spaces and standing in their own feces, but now they aren't even inspected beyond a cursory high speed viewing. 

Several local grocery stores keep selling out of their organic milk, placing a sign on the empty shelves that demand is outpacing supply.   With more disclosures like the sham meat inspections, you can bet that pasture  and humanely raised meats and poultry will become much more in demand and be reasonably priced. The FDA keeps losing prestige and has shamefully become a puppet for the industry.  President Roosevelt must be turning over in his grave.


I am more and more delighted and pleased with every passing month that I can afford to continue purchasing beef, pork and poultry products via my local food coop. I am on a first name basis with some of them now because I do send them an e-mail whenever I buy, prepare and eat a particularly delicious and flavorful roast or whatever from these hard-working folks.


Case in point: We ate a lot of beef liver when I was a kid on Dad's small truck farm back in Massachusetts, but I never really liked the way Mom prepared it, rolled in flour and fried, it was dry and tasteless.
I decided to give it another try from the Coop, and what a difference preparation makes! This grass fed beef liver is awesome, and I just ordered my 4th package.
I recently bought Italian Pork Sausage, it was also delicious, and when I read this article, it makes me sick!


There are several petitions floating around regarding this stupidity, hope everyone here takes the time to add their signature.



Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2015, 01:10:17 PM »
Linda,


Even the sausages and liverwurst prepared using the well cared for animals are much more flavorful than the supermarket brands.  While the preparation is important of course, any chef knows that the quality of the ingredients is the first step.  With all the articles you have posted here, I have have really changed my shopping strategy, seeking out the pastured, humanely raised products and organic dairy and produce.  I thank you for giving me that "nudge".
It has made a big difference. 


When I think of the limited availability of 'our kind of food" when I started WB in December, 2012, the demand has created quite a market of available foods and the prices keep becoming more competitive, except for almond flour and coconut oil which has increased in cost.  As a group, we are really making a difference.   :)






Linda R

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2015, 03:27:45 PM »
Linda,


Even the sausages and liverwurst prepared using the well cared for animals are much more flavorful than the supermarket brands.  While the preparation is important of course, any chef knows that the quality of the ingredients is the first step.  With all the articles you have posted here, I have have really changed my shopping strategy, seeking out the pastured, humanely raised products and organic dairy and produce. I thank you for giving me that "nudge".
It has made a big difference. 


When I think of the limited availability of 'our kind of food" when I started WB in December, 2012, the demand has created quite a market of available foods and the prices keep becoming more competitive, except for almond flour and coconut oil which has increased in cost.  As a group, we are really making a difference.   :)


You are very welcome. 
Your contributions to this forum have been extremely helpful and valued. So glad you joined our group.

Jan in Key West

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2015, 06:10:50 AM »

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2015, 07:35:19 AM »
Jan,


Great article!  There is hope!  Slowly, ever so slowly,  the trend is taking hold.   It was encouraging to read about North Carolina organizing and providing various state markets with a healthy pastured product.  Won't be long before other areas of the country organize their farmers and customers, making this an economical feasibility for everyone.   :)


All the highlighted references are worthwhile reading as well. 


Pastured, properly fed chickens are becoming available at a reasonable price as well.  A story from my suburban childhood: every week my mother bought freshly killed chicken from a live market.  They delivered.  My siblings and I used to laugh about "the chicken lady" who brought the chickens into the kitchen to be inspected by Grandma.  Only then was she paid. The lady always smelled funny to us and wore strange looking clothes.  We had no idea why.  One time, I was about 5, I asked her why there were so many feet and even showed her my book with pictures of chickens.  She laughed and laughed but never answered my question.  My Mother explained that they bought them 'special' to make soup.  Aha!   




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Re: Still buying Hormel, Farmland, etc?
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2015, 07:35:19 AM »

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