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Author Topic: making mustard at home  (Read 1021 times)

Redhead65

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making mustard at home
« on: February 19, 2015, 04:03:43 AM »
Hi, has anybody here made mustard at home without owning a fancy high performance blender?
I had wanted to buy a high performance blender at one time but cannot afford one in the next half year.
On the other hand I am fed up with the mustard I find in stores.  Even those brands that I used to like I now perceive as artifical. In an arganic store I also tried mustards, but I do not want one that is so spicy that my tongue is on flames, and I also do not want a mustard with whole seeds that will continously slip down from the food onto the plate.
Besides, whatever I try is too sweet for me.

Yesterday I was at a candy store that has all the top of the line swiss chocolate (sugar-free, raw, wild cocoa beans...you name it, they have got it), and I looked at their mustards and vinegars. The mustard had added flavour....e.g. champage flavour....and starch. *thumbsdown".

To make a long story short: I am mustard-frustrated.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: making mustard at home
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2015, 06:45:37 AM »
Redhead,

Just google "how to make mustard" and you will find many recipes and even commentaries on this subject.  There are many kinds of mustard seeds.  You grind them with a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder.  Endless varieties of vinegar, water, spices like tarragon and other additives are listed.  You can even purchase ground mustard (dry) for recipes that require a "rub" on the meat.  Mustard is a world wide condiment, whether prepared or homemade.  Many mustards are used for specific regional cooking like the very hot Chinese mustards. I'm sure your mustards in Germany reflect the complimentary tastes of your foods.   Mustards keep very well, so spoiling isn't usually a problem and they are easy to make.

Redhead65

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Re: making mustard at home
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2015, 10:55:00 AM »
I found a video on youtube. In fact there are so many. You are right.  I have decided that i will not buy a small and inexpensive coffee grinder until I have at least once successfully made mustard by myself at home with organic ground mustard seeds. I want to make sure that I want to make mustard again.

Today I searched the net and found an online store selling organic
seeds (ground) and also other interesting spices - all organic and without any separating agents added. They also have interesting salt types - for example a slightly blue looking salt from Iran.
The shop owner was really friendly. She said that her husband makes mustard all the time and she will give me an opportunity to talk with him this week.

Near where I live there is a small scale mustard manufacturer which even offers mustard-making classes - like cooking classes. They do not have proper information on the webpage, but I have asked them to call me back. Let's see what happens. They claim that they use mustard grown locally.

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Re: making mustard at home
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2015, 10:55:00 AM »

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