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Author Topic: Eating Meat 101  (Read 3934 times)

Jan in Key West

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Eating Meat 101
« on: May 17, 2015, 05:59:07 AM »

Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2015, 07:51:03 AM »
You need to combine a lot of different veggies to get what you do in one piece of meat.  Nice of Mother Nature to package our needs so conveniently. I would eat a half pound of meat a day and skip the veggies but my DH would die of boredom.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2015, 08:13:29 AM »
Lynda,


One of the things I really miss is the crisp crunch you get with certain foods.  I satisfy most of this by eating those kirby cucumbers or sliced jicama.  Sometimes I will even make those cheese crackers.  Eating only meat would be very boring to me.  I would miss spinach!  Beef stew would never be the same. :'(


All this would sure make shopping easier.  We wouldn't need a gigantic refrigerator either. 


Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2015, 08:53:34 AM »
Wouldn't shopping be great?  I could get into no meal planning.  I would really miss potato and avocado; broccoli, not so much. Oh , and the occasional artichoke.  How come articles never mention how nutritious the old artichoke is?  Maybe they just don't know how to cook it? Out of fashion like beets, I guess. If they want kids to eat their veggies, why don't they push ones that taste better... not broccoli and brussels sprouts (which few people can cook well). What kid doesn't like dipping artichoke leaves in butter and making a mess? One of my favorite meals is steak and an artichoke.

BarbinNC

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2015, 10:49:54 AM »
I admit - I love to cook and bake.  I guess it's obvious, my favorite reading is a good low carb recipe book, in all formats.  It's really something I do passionately and for fun.  So it is difficult to go just meat and water for long periods of time.  I aim to do at least 30 days, starting today. 


I also miss the crunch, and sometimes just adding a bit of celery or plain lettuce will suffice. 


But the ease and convenience of buying a slap of rib eyes and slicing off a thick steak every day and grilling to nicely seared on outside, rare on inside, is so delicious, it's certainly no hardship.


Traditions like preparing family dinners are hard to give up, there are expectations and I honestly don't always like others to invite me, because at least I'm in control of what goes into the food, if I prepare it. We usually end up catering to several different dietary preferences, my niece doesn't eat pork, my Mom and sister nothing rare, Mom not a bit of salt (as said on another thread, it would be so much healthier for her to ingest some good salt, but she refuses, and I wonder if some of her senility wasn't caused by it)


So I guess for a while longer, I will be the one doing most of the cooking and baking for our holidays and birthdays, along with DD  and SIL who thankfully, are on the same wavelength.  Its definitely fun to put the menus together and try out new recipe, but in the long run, I'm sure we will phase out these elaborate dinners for easy just meat and water dinners.  Wonder what my family would say to that?  At least in my house they get healthy, non GMO, organic and grain fee meals.




Lynda (Fl)

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2015, 03:13:10 PM »
Bring your own might be a good idea, Barb.  ;)   You might have a point for your Mom on the salt.  Could you sneak it in slowly, so she gets used to it?  I have the feeling your Mom would be a super-taster.  You take such good care of her. Since she probably doesn't break a sweat often, she's probably okay.

Jan in Key West

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2015, 09:01:59 AM »
Want a bigger brain and smaller waistline? Eating meat might be the answer........http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2008/04/eating-meat-led-to-smaller-stomachs-bigger-brains/

Rita

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2015, 01:39:50 PM »
I eat meat, but I eat more veggies than meat.  I think there are important nutrients that we miss if we just eat meat.   Beef for instance is low in magnesium, Vitamin E, vitamin C (unless you eat liver), folate (unless you eat liver), etc.


I also think about the herbs that were used in Ancient Chinese Medicine, Ayervedic Medicine and other ancient cultures.   There is power in plants.   

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2015, 03:58:50 AM »

To expand on Rita's comments:

Dried fruits, herbs  and seeds have always been an important addition to diet.  Even ship captains knew this and would dry lemon peels and then soak them in water for lemonade for scurvy prevention.  Cooks would dry plants and seeds for flavoring their dishes.  Shamans all over the world used local dried items for their medicinal cache.  Every civilization on every continent would harvest and dry them (presumably over the summer and fall seasons) to ensure a supply until a new crop could grow in the spiring and summer. 

Regional cooking flavors and styles were developed based on these herbs, fruits and seeds.  The spice trade was so important that trade routes were developed overland and then expanded to sea routes over thousands of years.  Many battles were fought to control the territories.  Remember the Silk Road?  It wasn't just silk from China.  It was cinnamon, peppercorns, teas, ginger and many other regional items. 

This is why I think a meat based diet must include some vegetables and seeds/funghi/leaves/tubers. 

Loanne

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2015, 11:05:29 AM »
I seem to switch back and forth from meat to chicken and eggs.  Don't eat as much cheese as I used to in the WB beginning.  Adding crumbled sausage to my eggs is my recent favorite, even though I don't eat pork regularly.  I like fish (salmon mainly), too, once in awhile.  Seem to stick with grass-fed beef mainly.  Thinking I haven't had a chuck roast in the crock pot lately.  :)   Fixed some chicken legs dredged in almond flour and seasonings last night.  Very good!

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Re: Eating Meat 101
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2015, 11:05:29 AM »

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