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Author Topic: Arrowroot Powder  (Read 4011 times)

Loanne

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Arrowroot Powder
« on: March 29, 2016, 10:59:22 AM »
I see that in Dr. D's new post, he's included arrowroot powder in the blueberry cheesecake, or at least approved its use by the Wheat Free market.  For some reason, I thought that ranked up there with potato starch and stuff like that.  Am I off track here?  I've never used it and am hesitant to.

bill

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2016, 11:19:15 AM »
According to Wikipedia:
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[/size]"Like other pure starches, however, arrowroot is almost pure [/color][/size]carbohydrates[/color][/size] and devoid of [/color][/size]protein[/color][/size]..."[/color][/i]

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2016, 12:42:40 PM »
With arrowroot, it comes down to portion size. The recipe is 10 to 12 servings.

One table spoon of arrowroot flour is just under 7 grams net carb, for the whole recipe. Divided by 10 is a mere 7/10ths gram of net carb contribution to each portion.

bill

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2016, 01:09:22 PM »
I'd eat it.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2016, 01:17:24 PM »
Another factor here is that the other low-carb thickeners and emulsifiers previously recommended may be coming under some scrutiny as gut biome antagonists. We may find that, with some attention to net carb impact at the portion, arrowroot provides the structural/consistency function without the gut downside.

Wheat Belly Blog last year: The battle for bowel flora

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2016, 02:35:12 PM »
Arrowroot, tapioca, potato, konjac and similar powdered starches are very useful in cooking and baking.  As Boundless stated, it is the amount of the starch used that is important.  Most of the ready made gluten-free mixes consist of mainly these starches which are highly glycemic and because they elevate your blood sugar so quickly and high, we don't use them. 

A teaspoon or tablespoon of this starch will hold your fishcakes together.  A thin coating on an animal protein sliced small/thin for Chinese stir fry will seal the juices in.  Same thing goes for meats/poultry pounded and then coated with a starch (instead of previously used flour).  As a gravy thickener, these starches work well.  Because of the high glycemic value, the key is to use the smallest amount possible.  I will coat the chicken or meat using a plastic or paper bag and shake profusely so that the minimal coating is left on the protein.  This does the job.  No dredging like we used to do.

Using these starches sparingly will make a big difference in the final product because the texture is usually improved and the item tastes lighter.  I recommended a cookbook called Paleo Perfected a few months ago.  This cookbook was written by America's Test Kitchen and is considered their handbook.  They discuss how and why each kind of starch works or doesn't work in various recipes. 

I am really glad to see Wheat Free Market Foods and Dr. Davis use these starches in small amounts.  They do make a big impact and to me, the added carbs are worth it.

Loanne

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2016, 03:12:43 PM »
Thanks for these great explanations!  I've been adding a bit of cream to skillet meals lately, and that works to thicken, too.  But  I may get brave and try arrowroot powder.  And get that cookbook!  Thanks again!

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2016, 07:29:01 PM »
Loanne,

Like you, I often use cream to thicken.  I've been trying to get away from using dairy products so a thickener starch is useful.  I was taught to lightly coat animal proteins for stir fry made in a wok, using cornstarch.  Not using the cornstarch to seal the protein makes it crucial that you don't overcook and wind up with a dry and stringy meal with not enough juices.  Substituting the cornstarch for another healthier starch (in smaller amounts) makes it easier to get a delicious meal on the table with out an overabundance of carbs. Starches also provide elasticity to baked goods so their mouthfeel and crumble improves and sauces have s smooth taste which incorporates all the flavors used and coats the food.

To buy arrowroot, check the spice section of your grocery store for a small jar.  Bob's Red Mill and other companies like them sell larger amounts which will last you a long, long time.  It doesn't need refrigeration either.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Arrowroot Powder
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2016, 07:29:01 PM »

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