This forum is created by people who follow the Wheat Belly Diet, as a place to communicate with each other about various topics. Please note that this site is a user created site, and not one of Dr. Davis' sites.

Author Topic: Ketosis with potatoes  (Read 626 times)

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Ketosis with potatoes
« on: April 27, 2018, 04:07:57 PM »
I decided to try cooked, cooled, and reheated potatoes, as well as cooked, cooled and frozen rice with an otherwise ketogenic diet.


The potato serving each day was around 4 ounces.  I loaded them up with butter, sour cream and cheese.  Yum!


Potatoes were cooled overnight.  The rice was cooked, frozen and reheated.  (So they both had plenty of time to turn to resistant starch.)





After 5 days of doing this, my ketone test strips say I'm in ketosis.

bill

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2018, 09:35:54 AM »
Rita:


I'm not convinced. 


If you have excess blood glucose,
your ketones will stay high in your blood until that
glucose is burned off.  Do you have a Ketonix?  I'd be
interested to know if you stay in fat burning mode
throughout this type of experiment.  Ketonix measures
acetone in your breath, which can only show up if you
are metabolizing fat. 


Why would you ever need to force an increase the amount of
carbs in your diet?  As has been stated on this and many
other sites, the amount of starch that becomes "resistant"
is vanishingly small.  The rest, you metabolize as pure sugar.


So many people try to negotiate on a keto diet so they can
eat more carbs.  I don't see the point.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 678
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2018, 10:39:41 AM »
Rita: The rice was cooked, frozen and reheated.  (So they both had plenty of time to turn to resistant starch.)

My guess is that only 15% of the starch re-polymerizes. So, for 4 oz. of potato (113g), that suggests 20g net carb - which would be the whole day's allowance for generic KD.

re: After 5 days of doing this, my ketone test strips say I'm in ketosis.

Interesting. Did you happen to check any postprandial BGs, at 30-60 minutes after start of meal?
___________
Bob Niland [disclosures] [topics]

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2018, 01:22:06 PM »
I'll keep measuring to see how long I stay in ketosis while eating resistant starch.

I did a ketogenic diet for 12 weeks several years ago, and that diet does not work for me.  Diet is very bio-individual.  And, if you have thyroid or
adrenal issues, the ketogenic diet isn't ideal.

The last time I did the ketogenic diet, I had serious constipation, to where I wound up in the emergency room.  It took me about a year to get my body back on track again.   This is why I'm experimenting doing the ketogenic diet with resistant starch.

Bob-  I have not checked my BG.  I've misplaced my meter. 

bill

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2018, 03:21:39 PM »
Betahydroxybuterate in the blood does not indicate
being in ketosis.




Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2018, 04:03:45 PM »
Quote
Betahydroxybuterate in the blood does not indicate ketosis.

I did a urine test, which I believe measures acetoacetate.

bill

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2018, 09:55:04 PM »

Spilling ketones in your urine doesn't mean you are
in ketosis.  It just means that you are inefficiently spilling
ketones, not using them.  Everyone has a certain
amount of ketones circulating all the time, more
or less amounts at different times depending on
many factors, such as time of day, level of activity
what you have eaten, etc.  Also, if you show no ketones
in your urine, it doesn't mean anything either. 

The measurement that proves you
are metabolizing ketones is whether you have acetone
in your breath.  That is because as you burn acetoacetate,
the byproduct is acetone which is not burned by the body.
Ketonix is the cheapest method to measure this.

Furthermore, I can't imagine why anyone chases ketones.
Seems a useless thing to do for optimal health.  You want
to see high readings of ketones in blood or urine?  Take
exogenous ketones.  Won't necessarily improve health,
but it will increase those numbers.

(updated to fix formatting issues)
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 11:38:04 AM by Rita »

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2018, 01:56:18 PM »
Still in ketosis, with potatoes everyday.

Just came across an article by Dr. Davis on the Keto Trap:

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2017/06/the-keto-trap/

"But the one pitfall, that most people do not understand, when they follow these keto type diets, is that you must cultivate bowel flora. See, when you go ketogenic, you’ve eliminated carbohydrates; essentially complete elimination, but prebiotic fibers that nourish bowel flora, only come in carbohydrate foods. So it doesn’t mean you need a lot of bunch of carbs — does not mean that — it means that you need to get food such as green unripe bananas, or raw white potatoes, or inulin powder, or fructooligosaccharides, or modest servings of legumes that contain galacto-oligosaccharide prebiotic fibers. Because this is how you cultivate bowel flora."

bill

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2018, 02:11:36 PM »
"Still in ketosis, with potatoes everyday."

By what measurement?


Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2018, 09:35:00 AM »
The ketone test strips... as mentioned earlier.  This shows excess ketone bodies (acetoacetate) excreted via urine.  It's pretty accurate if it has a ketone reading.   As you become more keto-adapted however, you excrete less in the urine, and a blood test might be better, as it shows different ketone bodies.  But for now, it's showing I'm in ketosis.   

Also, with regards to your earlier comment about exogenous ketones, I'm in agreement that supplementing with ketones doesn't necessarily improve health.




bill

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 339
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2018, 11:10:30 AM »
Rita:


Have you watched this:

https://ketoedgesummit.com/expert/joe-anderson/

It's fromt he ketoedge summit that is available for free this week:

https://ketoedgesummit.com/?idev_id=14961&idev_username=MarkSisson&utm_source=14961


(updated to fix formatting issues)
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 11:36:32 AM by Rita »

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2018, 11:38:47 AM »
Thanks Bill.   I'm going to try to tune in if I have time this week.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Ketosis with potatoes
« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2018, 11:38:47 AM »

Sponsored Links