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Author Topic: Restaurant strategies  (Read 11897 times)

Rita

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Restaurant strategies
« on: April 22, 2013, 09:03:17 PM »
What are some of your best wheat-free strategies when you go to a restaurant?

Bing

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2013, 03:02:10 AM »
I switch to 'outdoors mode' which means I (try to) accept the fact that I won't have total control for a while.
I usually (try to) replace the bad stuff with more veggies.

arlin

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2013, 07:00:10 AM »
We've pretty much stopped going anywhere else to eat but home for the time being. We just don't feel we need the stress of trying to make it work when we're just now getting our feet wet and trying to figure out if we're doing this right. So we're being very careful. I know in time we'll feel more confident in our new found knowledge and be able to choose restaurants that can fit our needs and be picky about what we choose to order. We have ordered take out once since going on the plan, but made sure it was something like a steak salad.

I used to love to go out because I hated to cook! But now I really have no desire to eat out. I'm enjoying my time in the kitchen like never before and love trying out all the new recipes. My DH and DS are keeping me on track as to what is a "keeper" and what's not. So far, ALL keepers! :)

Rita

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2013, 07:59:37 AM »
Quote
But now I really have no desire to eat out. I'm enjoying my time in the kitchen like never before and love trying out all the new recipes.


Funny you say that.  I'm really enjoying my time in the kitchen these days as well.

arlin

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2013, 08:29:13 AM »
Rita, part of the fun is playing with some new toys!  :D For instance, I never felt the need for a food processor in the past, but now I use it almost daily. I'm all for new toys and gadgets! Who says that boys get to have the monopoly on that!! LOL

Joan from MN

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2013, 09:35:23 AM »
We don't go out to eat very often but have found a few restaurants with gluten-free options on the menu. Although it helps to ask questions. Once we asked, "What makes this dish gluten-free?" and the server said that it didn't have any cheese in it.  :D
 
Many restaurants will be happy to sub a vegetable or fruit side in place of bread or potatoes, etc. Sometimes I just ask for an extra vegetable. If we know ahead of time that the restaurant serves popovers or a bread basket, we let the server know that she/he doesn't need to bring it. 

Jan in Key West

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2013, 01:38:36 PM »
I wrote a comment a few days ago, but must have pushed the wrong button because I don't see it! We go out some and usually are fine when we order the meat with veggie sides. Where we get in trouble is with sauces and soups.....so we ask questions in a gentle and polite way. I think that we must see ourselves as educators......even when something is marked GF on a menu, doesn't mean it's necessarily low carb. I hope that restaurants will begin to train staff.....and if we don't continue to ask questions, it won't happen as soon as we'd like.

HS4

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2013, 12:41:41 PM »
We also eat mostly at home now with very few meals out.  I have been cooking for more years than I care to remember and had become truly tired of doing it.  But with new ideas from WB, Well Fed, Maria Emmerich, and other sources, I've begun to rediscover my love of cooking and baking.
 
Eating out for me almost always means just a protein (cooked in simplest way possible with no sauces) and either a salad (with olive oil & vinegar) or steam veg or both.  It can get boring, I admit, but then I also intend to 'cheat' a few times but only when it's truly worthwhile.
 
In case any of our friends here haven't heard, more and more restaurants are not only offering gluten free menus but more importantly, some are now offering low carb gluten-free with no bread substitutes!  For example, Panera has a 'hidden menu' that consists of 4 salads as lunch choices; 3 are nearly zero carbs (chicken or turkey or steak + salad veg + half fresh lemon + packet of EV olive oil), one is low carb (hummus & salad veg).  They are actually quite good.  To see their hidden menu just google 'panera hidden menu' and you'll find it.  I've also read, very recently, that other national chains are starting to offer similar 'hidden' choices, including McDonald's.  I don't know more than that right now and in any case I consider everything McD offers to be in the junk food cateory.

arlin

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2013, 03:02:14 PM »
Thanks for the tip about Panera  HS4. We used to eat there quite a bit, and I was a little sad that I couldn't anymore (LOVED their breads!). I never knew about the "hidden menu" but will be sure to take a look at it. It would be lovely if they could figure out a way to  make their delicious breads without using grains to do it!

ShinySheena

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2013, 03:21:20 PM »
I'm just so happy to find that I'm not the only one enjoying cooking again!  I used to groan and complain about having to cook but now I'm whipping up new things from scratch and totally enjoying it!    What a big change.


Neicee

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2013, 03:12:37 PM »
We go out to lunch more often than dinner.....places like Texas Roadhouse are easy to navigate, and Outback.  There house salads are both great and I do have the blue cheese dressing.  Steamed veggies with a grilled piece of steak/chicken/even some fish will do fine.  I hear that even Subway is offering lettuce wrapped sandwiches.  Can't make that a promise because I don't eat there.  I love to cook but my hubby loves to eat out.  Always looking for something new to savor.

deanna in AR

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2013, 06:56:55 PM »
Niecee, we love Outback, so consistent no matter what town were in. I usually have shrimp on the barbee, a salad (we stopped the blue cheese dressing) and steamed veggies, DH gets a steak. We share the veggies and occasionally share a baked potato loaded.

Neicee

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2013, 05:58:09 PM »
Niecee, we love Outback, so consistent no matter what town were in. I usually have shrimp on the barbee, a salad (we stopped the blue cheese dressing) and steamed veggies, DH gets a steak. We share the veggies and occasionally share a baked potato loaded.
Oh yea, Texas Roadhouse has a Sunday special of their $$ 1/2 lb. burger for $5.00.  For me, that's the cheapest 'breakfast' in town.  They no longer ask about the bun, because we don't want one and they know it.  They've always been accommodating about subbing out the fries for a salad.  Used to love the coconut shrimp at Outback but afraid they do use flour as the binder to hold the coconut.  Cook them at home now and have found I can reproduce the orange/ginger/red chili flake dipping sauce with no sugar.

Jan in Key West

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2013, 06:26:42 PM »
We're staying in Lexington tonight.....a steakhouse across the road from our hotel, "Malones".....not sure if it's a chain or not but when I started asking questions about the menu, they sent the ass't manager out and he gave me the GF menu....complete with menu ingredients of sauces, soups etc. they were very considerate....had a great meal....5 oz. fillet mignon, Alaskan king crab leg (1) and Asparagus!  Tasty!

bcflyfisher

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2013, 02:25:37 PM »
My wife and I haven't found it to be all that hard eating in restaurants.  We had already been doing a slacker's version of the original Paleo Diet for about 2 years so most of the work was already done and we're already quite accustomed to skipping bread, potatoes, rice, and usually dairy.  The big trick is being aware of the little hidden things you'd never know about if you weren't paying close attention.  As a bonus, I've been enjoying adding back some of the foods that conventional wisdom has been telling us to avoid for years (decades) - good fats!

In restaurants we almost always look for something that is already almost wheat free / low carb with the possible exception of one of the side dishes (in other words, the meal isn't centered around a wheat / high carb item).  We then ask to skip the offending side and sub extra veggies which has never been a problem.  We've found a couple of places that even offer to give you a couple of different veggies instead of just doubling up on the one already included.  We don't eat out all that much and accept that on occasion there will be traces of something in a sauce that we wouldn't include ourselves and wouldn't purchase in a store but I also walk down the side of the road when big trucks are driving by and breathe their exhaust.  I'm not attempting to live in a bubble.   :)

Meal salads with a protein source are usually a good bet - she goes with no dressing, I take oil/vinegar on the side and maybe dip my fork in it a couple of times.

I'd like to see more places offer lettuce wrap options for their hand-held foods (burgers, sandwiches, wraps, hotdogs, whatever).  We do this at home a couple of times per week and just love it!  The fact that I figured out how I was going to eat burgers while camping again is just brilliant.


One thing I'm unsure about is whether we can go to a sushi place again, which we used to LOVE.  There's sashimi (most expensive thing on the menu) and.......?
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 02:35:26 PM by bcflyfisher »

Wheatless in Seattle

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2013, 04:46:59 PM »
Quote
I hear that even Subway is offering lettuce wrapped sandwiches. 
I'm glad to hear that.  I hadn't been to Subway in a long time. 
 
As for sushi, I eat it weekly.  I feel that the small amount of rice in Nigiri sushi and sushi rolls won't harm me, and I'm getting all that wonderful fish protein.  I have a favorite place that keeps my bottle of San-J Low Sodium Wheat Free Tamari sauce for me (they bring it out when I arrive).  They serve various pickled veggies as 'salad' alongside the sushi combo, so it's a wonderful meal.   

Randal

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2013, 02:12:14 PM »
Be careful ordering steaks. I used to think that steaks were made by taking a piece of cow and applying fire. It turns out that many restaurants use bread crumbs to help make nice sear marks. Make sure to ask the servers how the steaks are prepared.

Teresa

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2013, 06:54:03 AM »
I always check out the menu online and decide what I'm going to have before I go.  If I can't find anything, I choose another restaurant and try again. Unless it's not my choice (like a work event or something), then I just do the best I can.  Pretty much every restaurant has steak or chicken and veggies.  Plus, it's not like it's my last meal.  If I can only pick at my meager options I can still enjoy the company and a glass of wine (I know, I know).  There will be another meal tomorrow, or probably as soon as I get home, lol.
 
Like I said in another thread, I don't stress too much over wondering if there might be hidden wheat in something.  Of course, I don't have celiac and gluten won't kill me, so I have the luxury of not having to worry about that.  I just do the best I can and have a good time.  :)
~Teresa

fudgecake

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2013, 03:25:08 PM »
What are some of your best wheat-free strategies when you go to a restaurant?


My strategy is to cheat.


Yeah. Like today I was at a restaurant and ordered a salad that was served with bread. I didn't eat the bread. But there was some small cake squares for dessert and I had a couple. So far no strange behaviors or anything.


SHUTUP!!!


oops sorry.


But seriously, at some point each person has to make the compromises that are acceptable to them. And you may have to experiment in order to learn how much you can compromise, if at all. It depends how sensitive you are to wheat. Today I ate more wheat than I have in the last three months and so far I don't feel any negative effects.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 03:28:30 PM by fudgecake »

Teresa

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2013, 05:42:39 PM »
I agree, you have to find the balance you can actually live with long term.  I really have little desire anymore for bread, pasta, whatever...anything with wheat.  So the occasional bite of something isn't really something that worries me too much.  I think it still equals out to about 99% wheat free overall.  I haven't had any negative consequences as a result of my little dumplings last night but I find that it usually hits me around 36 hours out so we'll see how I feel tomorrow morning, lol.
~Teresa

deanna in AR

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2013, 06:48:27 AM »
But I always think of a testimonial I read early on..."I ate one cookie and gained 30 pounds." Of course it was over several months, but the addictive properties got her :((

Jan in Key West

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2014, 05:11:25 AM »
We've all probably read a variation of this article: http://madamaphrodite.hubpages.com/hub/15-Non-Organic-Clean-Foods-That-Are-Safe-to-Eat


When applying this to restaurant strategies, we may want to re-think ordering salads, unless specified as "organic" on the menu, especially since non-organic greens tend to be highly toxic. Sysco, one of the largest national commercial food distributors, now has a line of organic (and sometimes, locally sourced) options available. So it never hurts to put a bug in your servers ear.....he/she will in turn, go up the chain of command and if they hear it enough.....it could effect some change.

Rita

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2014, 10:21:48 AM »
I find it hard to eat out at restaurants anymore.   I used to consider it such a treat.   Now I  try my best to avoid it.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2014, 10:54:25 AM »
Rita,


Same here.  Not eating wheat/grains or sugar makes most restaurant meals somewhat limiting unless the chef is talented and interested in preparing a special meal for you!  Our tastebuds are much more sensitive to flavors and the overly sweet, brined or salted foods just don't cut it anymore.  I really dislike settling for mediocre tasting food when eating out.  This should be a treat, not something you "settle for."






Randal

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2014, 10:55:24 AM »
Rita, I'm in the same boat as you. My problem is, everyone else in the world looks at restaurant eating as a treat or a reward. It's not so bad with my friends. It used to be "let's go out and eat before we go drinking" or "let's go to this awesome Happy Hour that has great appetizers." My friends are cool about it (for the most part), knowing if we do go out I might not eat much or if at all. (The guys sometimes rip into me about jumping onto the "latest fad," but all I have to do is point out that I lost 60 pounds and I'm seeing a girl much younger than me and they don't have girlfriends.)


It's much more difficult with work, because going out to eat is seen as such the reward. We did great on a project, let's go out to lunch. Let's have a team-building lunch. It's your birthday, here's a sugar- and carb- loaded cake, now let's take you out to lunch. Luckily I have a good boss who knows my health choices, and if we do go out as a team, he makes sure it's a place where I can get something that fits into my WOE. All the same, I'd rather just eat the food I prepare myself.

HungryinTN

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2014, 11:36:46 AM »
We have one great restaurant in town that as a local and organic menu with no hidden gluten or sugar or corn starch (I've spoken with the sous chef), but it is quite pricey.  Lots of options in Nashville, but that's a 45 minute drive AND pricey.  There are many times when I get home after a long day at work, take one look at the kitchen, and want to turn on my heel and head back out the door for dinner (I don't have a dishwasher which seems to make EVERYTHING harder).  In the old days, I caved every time.  But now every time that happens, I might make it as far as the car before deciding I'd rather just have a couple of fried eggs and some sauerkraut for dinner than eat the crap at any of the restaurants.  So instead of going out 2-3X/week for $15 a pop, I go out about once a week for closer to $50.  I'm trying to cut back further, but going out to eat is one of my favorite simple pleasures. 


Favorite dish at new favorite restaurant:  local, pasture-raised filet mignon with truffle-fried cauliflower and Brussels sprouts with (organic, pastured, uncured) bacon.  The one thing I get in trouble with is the duck confit risotto appetizer...YUM!

Linda R

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2014, 01:07:05 PM »
Rita, I'm in the same boat as you. My problem is, everyone else in the world looks at restaurant eating as a treat or a reward. It's not so bad with my friends. It used to be "let's go out and eat before we go drinking" or "let's go to this awesome Happy Hour that has great appetizers." My friends are cool about it (for the most part), knowing if we do go out I might not eat much or if at all. (The guys sometimes rip into me about jumping onto the "latest fad," but all I have to do is point out that I lost 60 pounds and I'm seeing a girl much younger than me and they don't have girlfriends.)



Love it!


Good for you! :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2014, 02:04:29 PM »
Randal,


What a terrific attitude you have!  I remember when you first posted here and explained how you didn't cook and needed help with the basics.  Now you are preparing most of your meals at home.  Good for you.  Hope you are very, very proud of yourself. 
Lots of really positive things going on in your life now.   :)




Silly Human

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2014, 07:40:13 AM »
Dominoes offers pizza with a gluten-free crust. When you go to order it, they warn that it may be cross contaminated. Note, it's also not likely low-carb. I figured, I'm eating pizza anyway, might as well throw caution to the wind. It was not half bad. Rather than "thin and crispy," it had some serious crunch. It is what my mother would have called "a cast-iron crust," but I found it entirely edible since I did not have to cook it.

HungryinTN

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2014, 07:59:27 AM »
I have turned to the Dominoes gf pizza on many occasions when I had to push through a deadline and just could not stop to shop or cook or even go out. But I always pay for it in weight gain, joint pain, and sluggishness for the rest of the day.

Lila

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2014, 12:27:40 PM »
I have found restaurants (except Cracker Barrel) to be extremely accommodating. Everyone where we have eaten lately have been happy to substitute a salad or vegetable for the starch. We ate at Table 1280 in Woodruff Arts Center in Atlanta on our date night last week (dinner & a symphony) and they substituted a wonderful mix of grilled vegetables for the starch. (talk about yummy yummy--the wood fired flavor was amazing). Squash (yellow & zucchini), onions, and red sweet pepper. OMG


I could have just been satisfied with two orders of the vegetables. But had wonderful steak frites (sans the sauce) with the vegetables and an arugula salad. I don't care much for arugula, but shared it with DH. 


DH got a beautiful boneless short rib dinner. It was slow cooked and tasted like roast.


It is always good to ask about sauces, marinades and such. And hamburger. I think one time I got a hamburger at TGI Friday at an airport and it had some kind of binder they didn't tell me about when I asked.


We enjoyed our date night so much (and the symphony) we're going back again this Saturday.




HungryinTN

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #31 on: June 18, 2014, 02:44:28 PM »
I just wanted to give some kudos to the chain Jimmy John's for offering a handy"unwich."  In a moment of desperation today, on my tiny less-than-a-shoestring budget, starving and busy, I broke down and looked at the Jimmy John's website to see what I could find when I discovered that they offer a lettuce wrap as an option right up-front.  I ordered the "Big John" - roast beef, lettuce, and tomato (and added onion) and it was just what I needed to get me through.  So convenient - right across the street from the university AND they deliver - and it was just $6.50 even after tip.  To all of my nay-sayer friends who say it's "too expensive" to eat better, I say fiddlesticks. 
 
On the other hand, I checked the vending machine earlier to see if there was anything I would be willing to put in my body and ABSOLUTELY NOT.  Apparently there were some baked lays which I might have considered but my boss, who is also gluten-free, got the last bag earlier. 

Redhead65

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2014, 12:05:10 PM »
I have to check whether Dominos offers a gluten-free crust in Germany, too.

Randal, thanks for the hint regarding the source of the steak marks. I would never have thought of that.

When I eat out I usually try to take meat or fish, provided that it is not breaded, and I ask whether the side dish, for example pasta, can be replaced with veggies or a salad. I claim that I am not supposed to eat wheat, and then people are quite helpful, assuming that the authority = the doctor = has said that and that we must comply with what doctors say.  :P

Today my school friends went to a restaurant where I could not eat - so I just had some Kamut bread (2 slices with nothing else), and I ate stir-fried vegetables and scrambled eggs for dinner.

Randal

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2014, 03:49:43 PM »
You might want to experiment with 2-4 weeks without kamut bread. The good doctor has addressed this issue specifically:

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2014/02/should-you-eat-kamut/


Redhead65

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #34 on: November 16, 2014, 01:41:04 PM »
@Randal
Thanks for reminding me. It was good for me to read that link again, because I had completely forgotten that rice is also forbidden. I had not bought any rice since I am on WB - and I had also not eaten rice outside the house, but somehow it had escaped my radar that I should not reat it anyhow.
Am I the only one here who has trouble memorizing such things? *SIGH*

@all
Now that I am back in Germany, my strategies are different. The other day I went to an Italian restaurant. It was a public meeting  (meetup group), so I had no influence on the restaurant choice. I called the restaurant before, and I knew everything was with wheat. So I had a nice meal of veggies and salmon at home, and then I went to that restaurant and had a bottle of water.

That was the only time I went out since my return, but now I am more focused on eating what I want - so my first choice is eating at home.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #35 on: November 16, 2014, 01:57:13 PM »
> ... completely forgotten that rice is also forbidden. ...

Not forbidden, just festooned with warning signs: high glycemic, wheat germ agglutinin, organic arsenic (even if "organic rice"). It's a dose-response thing for all three hazards. I don't consider condiment quantities of rice to be a problem from time to time.

In the US, SmashBurger sells their burger dishes naked (no bun) or with GF buns (which might be an acceptable carb load if you only eat one of the two buns).

Redhead65

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #36 on: November 16, 2014, 02:04:27 PM »
Sorry, I linguistically do not quite understand what "agglutinin" means. My dictionary showed "agglutinin" as something "glueing, sticking to".

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #37 on: November 16, 2014, 03:07:13 PM »
> ... do not quite understand what "agglutinin" means.

Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is the lectin protein in wheat. It's also found in rice (it was just found in wheat first). It is suspect as a gut toxin and also blocks leptin (the satiety hormone) leaving you still hungry after eating.

Here's an interesting read about WGA, from 3 years before Wheat Belly:
http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2008/01/wheat-and-lactose.html

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Restaurant strategies
« Reply #37 on: November 16, 2014, 03:07:13 PM »

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