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Author Topic: Thanksgiving  (Read 5772 times)

Cici947

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Thanksgiving
« on: September 30, 2013, 03:36:54 PM »
Looking forward to my first wheat free Thanksgiving. I know it's early, but I have always been the one who makes the gravy so I'm stressing out a little bit & want to practice once or twice before the big day! Does anyone have actual experience thickening gravy with xanthan or guar gums? Also, any thoughts about stuffing/dressing?

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 05:19:04 PM »
Cici947,


Since this will be the first for me also, I did a quick search of paleo thanksgiving recipes.  There are many to choose from.  One was a "stuffing" made with ground beef and stuffing spices, another gave a recipe for a bread to use in their stuffing recipe.  Plenty to explore between now and T-day.  I was rather amazed at the ingenuity.  Seems like it is worth the time to explore further. 


I always cooked my turkey in a bag.  I will have to email Reynolds to see what I can use instead of the flour they want you to shake on the inside of the bag. 

Lila

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2013, 06:07:10 PM »
We will be smoking our fresh turkey breast, but I haven't figured out what will go with it yet.  Will be interested to hear about gravies (of course without stuffing, there's not much to put gravy on, LOL).  Am thinking green beans, maybe a squash casserole, maybe cauliflower mash.  And GG's cheddar pepper biscuits.

bill

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2013, 10:44:10 PM »
Cici947:


I made some gravy with drippings and
coconut flour.  It came out pretty good.

Linda R

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2013, 06:49:12 AM »
I am hoping that those of you who do eat turkey are considering the purchase of heritage turkeys, and are NOT buying Butterball or any brand that sells CAFO poultry.


The only way that disgusting practice will cease is for consumers to stop purchasing.




mosey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2013, 07:38:50 AM »
My DH is a gravy hound. pan drippings, bone broth, butter & coconut flour makes him very happy.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2013, 08:08:56 AM »
Linda R,


For many years I purchased fresh turkeys from a local farm.  The price was always a bit more money per pound, but nothing to break the bank.  Then local supermarkets started giving away free frozen turkeys if you purchased $300 worth of food within the month before the holiday.  The fresh turkeys couldn't compete with free. This went on for years.   The fresh, free range healthy turkey market never really recovered.  When fresh turkeys were available, they had to be ordered and pre-paid a month in advance and the cost was astronomical.  Yes, they tasted better in my opinion, but I simply refused to pay well over $100 for a large turkey.  [size=78%]  [/size]


Butterball turkeys are injected with the sugars and starches and artificial ingredients like those very popular $5 Costco rotisserie chickens.  The chemists made sure that the taste and feel of the flesh is soft, sweet, buttery and slightly salty.  The only problem is that these chickens and turkey don't taste like chicken or turkey.  Supposedly they are healthy for you to eat, but I'm guessing that we will soon start seeing reports of problems, just like those with meat and fish.


I am hoping that these local farms can produce a happy, healthy turkey at a reasonable, affordable price. 





Cici947

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2013, 09:33:14 AM »
Guess nobody has used the gums.  I'm roasting an organic chicken this week & will re-invent my gravy making skills. I'll let you know how it turned out!

Jan in Key West

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2013, 10:00:44 AM »
Cici.....yes, I have used xantham gum, as well as glucomannan capsules (which I break open) successfully but I've only used it in small increments.....just enough for two people. I found these to be less gritty than coconut flour when thickening a sauce. My advice would be to play around with it before Turkey-day and see what works best for you.


Glad someone opened this discussion....has anyone successfully made a dressing using nut flour breads? Since we don't eat many mimic foods, I have only made a few loaves and that was in the beginning of our journey....so, any advice would be welcome.  My husband insists that he will eat dressing 'no matter what' on Thanksgiveng.....and this is coming from a guy that is happy eating nuts & seeds for dinner....Sheesh!


Butterball turkeys are injected with starches and emulsifiers and lots of other evil stuff....best to go the free-range, unadulterated route. I think the company was under legal scrutiny a few years back for unethical practices as well.....most CAFO turkeys are pretty dirty birds.

Linda R

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 10:52:58 AM »

Butterball turkeys are injected with starches and emulsifiers and lots of other evil stuff....best to go the free-range, unadulterated route. I think the company was under legal scrutiny a few years back for unethical practices as well.....most CAFO turkeys are pretty dirty birds.


From what I've read, the entire poultry CAFO industry is the LEAST regulated of all and those animals are among the highest on the abuse scale.
I quit eating roast turkey years ago. I do not have a local producer nearby, and would have to travel to the other side of Des Moines to find a turkey farm. [In this state, it is corn, soy, and hogs, hogs, hogs.]


My local grass fed beef farmer is just 2 miles south of me and they also produce free range chickens, so I buy a whole one from time to time for the meat and broth.


So I totally ignore all those turkeys staring at me in the store during November.


mosey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2013, 07:52:25 AM »
Jan,

I have also used Almond Flour to make gravy, I like it better than Coconut Flour. As long as I add bone broth, pan drippings & butter w/ S&P it is very good. The other day DH actually asked for Cauliflower Mashed with gravy.

Lila

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2013, 09:33:34 AM »
Would you please post your almond flour recipe in the recipes topic?  I'd like to try it with cauliflower mash before the big T-day. 

Oh--I guess we are in the recipes part of the forum.  Duh!

« Last Edit: October 02, 2013, 10:04:41 AM by Lila »

Craigh71

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2013, 09:48:51 AM »
I've experimented with Xanthan gum to thicken soup.
 
I try sprinkling the stuff over the soup a teaspoon at a time and then give it a while.  It can take a remarkably small amount to thicken a big pot of soup.  It tends to continue thickening -- one batch of soup was of gravy consistency after a night in the fridge.
 
That said, it worked to my satisfaction and I've just become more sparing with the stuff.

mosey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2013, 07:29:51 AM »
Lila,
I'll try to tell you how I make this, don't really have a recipe. As a kid I was in charge of making Turkey day gravy so I just sort of adapted to WB. Take the bird out of the roast pan & put the pan on low over one or two burners depending on size of pan. Skim a bit of fat off the top (we don't have to do that now).  Using a whisk stir all the yummy brown bits into the liquid. For a big bird you will have about a cup of liquid. I keep chicken bone broth ice cubes so I usually add about 3 cubes & let them melt. For 3 cubes I would add 3 tbsp almond flour. Turn the heat up a bit and stir with whisk. Keep stirring, and stirring till thick. Sometimes this takes a lot of time adjusting the temp as you go. When thick add S&P to taste.

If you have not roasted a bird or other meat but want gravy to go with your cauliflower mash - in a small skillet melt bone broth cubes ( chicken or beef, depending on what you are serving) 3 to 4 cubes. Melt 3-4 tbsp butter & 3-4 tbsp almond flour & stir again till you get desired consistency, S&P to taste. 

You will probably need to try this a few times till you get the feel of it and feel confident, don't wait till the big day to try for the first time.

I use the WBCB Better than Mashed recipe for the cauliflower but I add 1/4 to 1/2 tsp nutmeg, it makes all the difference.

Good Luck

Cici947

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2013, 07:42:10 AM »
So I tried 2 different recipes.  First: to a small bowl I added 1/4 tsp xanathan and mixed it with s&p then added a little hot broth and whisked it together - it did form some small clumps, so it put my strainer over a saucepan and added it to the pot with 1 c hot broth & 1/2 c drippings & whisked.  I let it bubble for abt 10 mins, but it didn't seem to thicken much, so I added another 1/4 tsp xanathan in the same way.  It was definitely thicker, but still pretty thin.  After reading all the posts abt xanathan I was terrified I was going to make it gummy or slimy so figured a little thin was better than the alternative.
For the next recipe I added 1/2 chopped onion, 1 clove garlic to 1 c broth & cooked for abt 20-30 mins, until soft - I also added the onions from the roasting pan that I cooked the chicken with.  Then I put it in my blender & let it run until really, really smooth.  To the empty roasting pan (the one I just roasted the chicken in - not clean, just empty of fat or drippings.  Any yummies stuck to the bottom get to stay) I added 1/4 c white wine and 1 cup broth & let it boil a minute or two until the alcohol had burned off.  To this I added the pureed onion mixture.  The pureed vegetables are supposed to be the thickener of this gravy, but I didn't find it to thicken very much at all - it did have a kick a-- taste though!
I don't know why, but I decided to add these two gravies together & ended up with a killer gravy.  The pureed onions add some bulk, like flour does & the xanathan ended adding the perfect thickness. Without the onion puree mixture, the xanathan gravy was really smooth - similar to a cornstarch thickened sauce - not really gravy like.  As the gravy sat on the table throughout dinner it didn't turn into a solid mass like gravy made with flour does - which I thought was pretty awesome! 
I think the two recipes could probably be streamlined into one great recipe - which I will attempt probably once more before the big day! Phew, now I know it can be done & done deliciously! 

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2013, 08:21:25 AM »
Mosey  and Cici,


Both recipes sound just super.  Thanks!  My "meat and potato" crowd will be very happy!  The techniques and helpful hints are terrific.  One of my favorite meals is high temperature baked eye of round roast.  This technique will work perfectly with some other spices for a delicious gravy that I can eat too!  Creamy cauliflower and a green veggie or two, perhaps those Gourmet Girl cheddar biscuits complete the menu.  This should please my naysayers!


Jan in Key West

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2013, 03:35:27 PM »
Has anyone attempted to make dressing with any of the nut flour breads, or anything else like focaccia, flaxseed crackers etc? We're going to my step-daughters for the main T-Day meal, so I'm not doing the whole meal.....just some WB side dishes.

Linda R

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2013, 06:47:02 PM »
Here is Linda's recipe for stuffing.



FLAX BUN AND VEGETABLES STUFFING
2 Flax Sandwich Buns, cubed and dried *
3 tablespoons butter
10 ounces fresh cauliflower, chopped in bite-size pieces, 1/2 medium head
2 stalks celery, minced
1/2 cup onion, minced, 2 ounces or about 1/2 small onion
1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced or chopped
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning, or to taste (I used 1/4 teaspoon)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoons heavy cream
1 egg, beaten
1 tablespoon butter, cut up
In a large skillet over medium-high heat, sauté the cauliflower, celery, onion and mushrooms in butter until vegetables are tender and a little browned. Add the seasonings and cook for another minute or two. Remove from the heat and add the broth, cream and cubed flax buns. Stir to moisten the bun cubes well. Cover and let stand 5-7 minutes so that the buns can absorb the liquid. Add the egg and mix well. Put the mixture into a small greased casserole and dot with the 1 tablespoon cut up butter. Bake at 350º 30-35 minutes or until hot and lightly browned.Makes 4-6 servings Can be frozen
 Make Flax Sandwich Buns without the caraway seeds. Cut them into tiny cubes, then bake in a toaster oven at 200º until dry and crisp. Mine took about 30 minutes, but Nancy did hers for 10 minutes.






Per 1/4 Recipe: 247 Calories; 20g Fat; 10g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 6g Net Carbs
Per 1/6 Recipe: 165 Calories; 13g Fat; 6g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 4g Net Carbs


Nancy and I have been trying quite a few different recipes and combinations of meats, veggies and "breads" to come up with the ideal low carb stuffing substitute. This was one of Nancy's creations and it's very good. It combines a nice vegetable side dish with the flavor and texture of bread stuffing. If you don't have a muffin top pan to bake the sandwich buns, you can spread the batter in a small jelly roll pan then use 1/3 of the bread for this recipe.


************************************************************************************************************************

Linda R

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2013, 06:50:22 PM »
Here is her Flax Bun recipe referred to above.



FLAX SANDWICH BUNS
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flax meal
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons parmesan cheese
1 1/2 teaspoons onion powder
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoon granular Splenda
1/2-1 teaspoon caraway seeds, optional
1 1/2 teaspoons dry minced onion
3 eggs
1 1/2 tablespoons water
1 1/2 tablespoons oil



Put the dry minced onion in a small bowl and add just enough water to moisten; let stand until softened. Mix the dry ingredients; add the onions, eggs, water and oil. Pour the batter into 6 greased muffin top pans. Bake at 325º 15-20 minutes. To serve, split the buns horizontally to make two halves using a long, thin knife.


Makes 6 servings
Can be frozen


Per Serving: 140 Calories; 11g Fat; 8g Protein; 5g Carbohydrate; 3.5g Dietary Fiber; 1.5g Net Carbs

Jan in Key West

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2013, 03:22:43 AM »
Thanks Llinda R! I think I'll do a few trial runs and make the dressing to stuff some thick pork chops next week....with a side of sautéed spinach.

mosey

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2013, 06:56:04 AM »
Stuffing sounds great, at my house if it passes the DH test it's a keeper!

McIntyre

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Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2013, 12:49:57 AM »
The Wheat Belly Cookbook has recipes for dressing, green bean casserole, gravy, and of course, the mashed cauliflower!  There is even a pumpkin pie recipe!  Can't wait to try them all out!

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Thanksgiving
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2013, 12:49:57 AM »

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