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Author Topic: Meat and gut flora  (Read 874 times)

HungryinTN

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Meat and gut flora
« on: December 11, 2013, 02:31:22 PM »
I saw this come across my facebook feed and basically dismissed it because while I get a lot of my news from NPR, they are not exactly what I call a reliable source when it comes to nutrition.  But now my sister is using it to badger me about my new turn to meat eating and I don't have time to stop and think of a rebuttal.  Anybody? 
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/12/10/250007042/chowing-down-on-meat-and-dairy-alters-gut-bacteria-a-lot-and-quickly?utm_content=socialflow&utm_campaign=nprfacebook&utm_source=npr&utm_medium=facebook

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Meat and gut flora
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 05:25:39 PM »
The fact that the biome shifted in a few days isn't alarming, nor does the article say so. It's actually encouraging.

The article is basically inuendo:
"...
"But we didn't measure levels of inflammation in our subjects," David says.
...
Even just classifying
Bilophila as "bad bacteria" is a tricky matter ...
..."

People on a SAD diet have a biome tuned for carbs, including wheat. Wheat appears to be quite antagonistic to certain flora, quite beyond being a carb. Anyone assuming that the SAD biome is a healthy biome, and the article leaves that unsaid, is making a huge mistake.

We don't know exactly what the ideal profile is, but odds are it isn't the one supported by SAD. Switching to low-carb/paleo/keto/whatever, and reducing gut flora antagonists will change the profile (using a probiotic will accelerate that change). I'm betting it results in improved gut and overall health, and the indications so far support that.

HungryinTN

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Re: Meat and gut flora
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 08:57:55 PM »
Boundless to the rescue!  You've basically confirmed the impression I got from the cursory glance I took at the article, but I think the answer with my sister is just to not engage.  She and my mother are still very determined to make the vegetarian diet work for them.  I feel very strongly, based on my own experience, that it is not a healthy way to go.  But at least they are otherwise on the right track by increasing their intake of eggs, fish, and fat.  I am going to try to take some raw milk with me when I go down for Christmas, too.  If they're going to stick to their vegetarian "guns," then at least I can help them find the tools they need to stay as healthy as possible within their personal parameters of comfort. 

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: Meat and gut flora
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2013, 09:24:22 PM »
Anyone who wants to rely on the report can buy you a copy.

Since all we have is the breathless content-free NPR sky-might-or-might-not-be-falling report, other big questions are:
a. what meats from what source?
b. how were the animals fed & finished?
c. were any antibiotics or hormones involved?

Entirely apart from status of the volunteer guts, the above factors could have significant biome effects. Or, given the sorry state of what passes for modern nutrition science, they may just have screwed up something else.

The NPR article reads like it was written by a veg-head who desperately wants meat to be stricken from the menu, but couldn't quite tease that out of the actual report.

Wheat Free Forum

Re: Meat and gut flora
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2013, 09:24:22 PM »

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