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Author Topic: coffee and gluten sensitivity  (Read 17711 times)

Barbara from New Jersey

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coffee and gluten sensitivity
« on: January 10, 2014, 10:01:28 AM »
Someone posted this on WBB.  There are actually several articles to read if you scroll down the page. 


http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.gluten-issues-celiac-don't-drink-coffee/   Don't know if I got that right!  The article says not to drink pre-ground coffee, especially the commercial brands like Folgers or Maxwell house because of crops-contamination of proteins causing a gluten-like inflammatory response.  Dave Asprey (Bulletproof Coffee) has stated that it is likely that commercial coffees are contaminated with mold and can cause an inflammatory response.  It is suggested that premium, organic beans be ground at home if you drink coffee.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 05:51:40 AM by Barbara from New Jersey »

VibeRadiant

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 08:23:57 PM »
I read something to that effect as well, and switched to coffee beans instead of preground.

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2014, 05:04:35 AM »
> Don't know if I got that right!

Didn't. Here it is:
Coffee and Gluten Sensitivity: Never the Twain Shall Meet?
That site is messing with copy attempts.

> The article says not to drink pre-ground coffee ...

Any coffee addict can tell you that.
Fresh ground is a completely different experience than oxidized grit, ground who-knows-when. We won't even discuss instant, including Starbucks Via.

> Dave Asprey (Bulletproof Coffee) has stated that it is likely that commercial coffees are contaminated with mold and can cause an inflammatory response.

Well, Dave has a dog in the fight, and is selling a very high-priced bag 'o beans.

> It is suggested that premium, organic beans be ground at home if you drink coffee.


Sounds fine.

The article says: "... something that occurs during processing to make this particular type of coffee highly cross-reactive." So if you do either of these, no problem:
  • be gluten-free
  • stick with fresh ground
Coffee is a popular topic for food fright headlines. It seems to switch from fountain-of-youth to fatal-elixir every 6 months or so.
There is no doubt much to be learned about it yet. From an LCHF standpoint, for example, it does seem to mobilize glycogen stores, and can keep your blood glucose levels from getting down to therapeutic levels (e.g. R-KD), if that's what your goal is.

HungryinTN

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2014, 07:42:34 AM »
I've been following Dave Asprey's guidelines for buying coffee (without buying his particular pricey beans) since I started this WOE and it was life-changing.  I have always loved coffee but thought I couldn't tolerate caffeine because it always tore up my stomach and made me feel jittery.  Then I read the Bulletproof website and tried the whole organic-high altitude-locally roasted thing and sure enough, no more problems with coffee!  I have a local roaster who prints the roasting and grinding date on the bag, so I usually buy a bag of whole and a bag of ground (for convenience) and haven't noticed any difference in the way it makes me feel.  On the other hand, I ran out of my coffee while I was staying with my parents over the holidays and had a cup of my mom's Chock Full o' Nuts, a former favorite of mine, and experience the same old jittery, stomach-cramping, "caffeine intolerance" feeling.  It was the first time I had really tested myself on it and sure enough it made a huge difference. 

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 09:01:34 AM »
I've noticed that the organic, high altitude beans don't leave me with an acid stomach, jittery feeling or any other negatives.  I used to use A&P brand beans (colombian or 8 o'clock) in my machine which grinds the beans. I switched to premium brands freshly roasted from local coffee shops because they tasted smoother and more complex to me.  Still, I would stop drinking coffee after lunch time. 
Even with the butter and mct oil/coconut oil added, I sometimes felt jittery after the 5th cup which I sipped during the course of the afternoon.

The premium beans produce a smoother, more complex taste in my opinion.  I don't get jittery now either.  I can't say for sure that my new, improved WB body is the reason the coffee tastes so good now, with good energy rather than jittery energy resulting.  I can say that the high altitude, organic coffee is much more satisfying in taste. 
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 05:56:33 AM by Barbara from New Jersey »

Linda R

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2014, 09:59:25 AM »
So, if I am going to switch to an organic brand of coffee, anyone have suggestions regarding the brand?
Also, I like the French Roast from Maxwell House, is there a comparable organic brand?
And, how much of a price hike?




Jan in Key West

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2014, 10:06:00 AM »
My husband is our coffee expert and he gets 'cafedirect Machu Picchu' organic.......also 'Percol organic' which is , I believe is African.  Both are very good!

HungryinTN

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2014, 10:14:15 AM »
Peet's Coffee, Just Love, and Allegro are my usually brands of choice.  Just Love is roasted locally, and I think Peet's has a nearby roaster, too.  Both of them print the roasting date on the bag and mark their high altitude beans.  Allegro is just a pricey premium organic brand that Whole Foods carries, so I assume it has a fairly wide distribution. 

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2014, 10:38:38 AM »
Linda,


I believe you can try nearly any brand.  The dark roast may be to your liking more than the medium or light roasts.  My favorites are:
airshipcoffee.com (medium roast), 1Kcoffee.com (dark and medium roast) and Ravensbrew which is my very favorite.   There are many others!  My suggestion is to search online for information about coffee and roast variables.  When you are shopping, look for a bag that will tell you there are "hints of chocolate, orange, vanilla creme" and other descriptions.  You will think you are purchasing a fine wine!  The bag will also tell you the roast date. 

I bring the coffee home and store it in my pantry enclosed in a ziploc bag.  Various stores in my area sell these premium brands and often place them on sale which is when I stock up.  Expect to pay between $8 and $12 per bag.   I haven't shopped online for this kind of coffee yet, but my friends do and get good prices.  Jan's dh recommendation of Machu Picchu is an excellent brand!

The higher the elevation, the slower the coffee bean grows and the smoother the flavor.  This is why you pay a premium price I think.
The lower altitude beans are mass produced by big business so there are plenty of "shortcuts" used to enhance crop production. 
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 06:01:12 AM by Barbara from New Jersey »

Linda R

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2014, 12:32:44 PM »
Linda,


I believe you can try nearly any brand.  The dark roast may be to your liking more than the medium or light roasts. My favorites are:
airshipcoffee.com (medium roast), 1Kcoffee.com (dark and medium roast) and Ravensbrew which is my very favorite.   There are many others!  My suggestion is to search online for information about coffee and roast variables.  When you are shopping, look for a bag that will tell you there are "hints of chocolate, orange, vanilla creme" and others descriptions!  You will think you are purchasing a fine wine!  The bag will also tell you the roast date. 


The higher the elevation, the slower the coffee bean grows and the smoother the flavor.  This is why you pay a premium price I think.


Found an organic brand of coffee this AM, at my local HyVee, in the Health Market, that awesome section of the store that just continues to grow and get better and better. It is called Cameron's, I chose the French Roast. Just ground up enough for a pot full and had my first cup. Very good. Much more body and oomph than Maxwell House.

ldyrdr4311

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2014, 07:23:46 PM »
  Hate to rain on everyone's parade, but in Appendix A, pg. 233 in the WB book, both flavored coffee & tea are on the list of Beverages that are an unexpected source of wheat. Best bet probably is to call said company & ask if wheat is used in the process of making the flavored coffee or tea.
  Just last year, I found Cameron's Highlander Grogg coffee, to which I treated myself on occasion. It's a bit upsetting to find that there is the possibility that there could be wheat in it.  :(   The coffee didn't bother me at all, so if it's there, it could be a negligible amount.
  I do, however, remember reading in the book that all flavored coffees have wheat in them. Don't ask me where in the book that was seen, but darned if I can find it now, lol.

VibeRadiant

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2014, 05:00:33 AM »
I recall reading that too.

Mistyblue

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2014, 01:53:36 PM »
Not all flavoured coffee/ tea has wheat. I buy flavoured tea at a local health food store and it has gluten free on the package. If you go to some of the supplier websites for flavoured coffee, some are listed as gluten free.

Bren

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2014, 07:49:49 AM »
Coffee is a heavily sprayed commodity.  95% of the time, I drink organic.  I buy organic beans, grind them myself and use a french press.  Everyone loves my coffee.  It is pretty awesome.  No jitters.  Other coffee can sometimes cause jitters for me.


LibbyMe

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2014, 11:10:12 AM »
Interesting discussion since I have coffee...either I make iced-coffee and or have bpc in the morning.  I hadn't really paid attention to the kinds/types I should be buying.  So in reading this I have NO idea what is meant by premium.  Will that be stated on the packaging?  Can I purchase it at my local Publix?? I have 2 containers to finish (won't throw these out!) before I make a change.  I refuse to order coffee as it's expensive enough and the s/h issue makes it even more so. JMHO

Silly Human

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2014, 07:23:27 AM »
Coffee has been on the list of food that turned on me for a few years, but before that I was drinking Folger's "Simply Smooth." It was the least stomach upsetting coffee, and it is billed as gluten-free.

Linda R

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2014, 02:21:59 PM »
Coffee is a heavily sprayed commodity.  95% of the time, I drink organic.  I buy organic beans, grind them myself and use a french press.  Everyone loves my coffee.  It is pretty awesome.  No jitters.  Other coffee can sometimes cause jitters for me.


Me too. Now I am trying to get rid of the unopened container of Maxwell House French Roast that I bought a few months ago.


My Iowa Food Co-op now has a producer who carries delicious organic coffee beans, my new source.

Bea

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2014, 04:46:40 AM »
Meant to reply to this thread sooner, but got sidetracked.
The most significant paper I have read on this issue was published in 2013.
"Cross-Reaction between Gliadin and Different Food and Tissue Antigens"
Aristo Vojdani, Igal Tarash in Food and Nutrition Sciences
http://file.scirp.org/Html/5-2700516_26626.htm

Some may recall that Vojdani was one of the presenters in The Gluten Summit.

In essence they attempted to determine whether the Gluten sensitivity symptoms could be due to either cross-contamination with gluten-containing foods or cross-reactivity between α-gliadin and non-gluten foods.

Cross contamination seems to be the primary source of reactivity.
They concluded: "first, instant coffee is contaminated with traces of gluten, which were detected by our sensitive ELISA and inhibition assays; and second, drinking pure coffee but not instant coffee may be safe for individuals with gluten sensitivity and celiac disease as long as these individuals do not have classical allergy to coffee."

There was lots more but finally, they concluded:
"If a subgroup of patients on a gluten-free diet does not show improvement in their GI or other symptoms, attention should be given to dairy and other cross-reactive foods, such as yeast, corn, oats, millet and rice, as shown in the present study. If after adherence to a strict gluten-free diet and the elimination of cross-reactive foods symptoms still persist, further investigation for other food intolerances should follow."
"In the absence of the proper dietary elimination of gluten, the present study supports the hypothesis that if the high prevalence of antibodies against dietary proteins and peptides and their cross-reaction with various tissue antigens are not taken seriously, and if proper measures are not implemented, the result may be the development of autoimmunity in the future."

I've been drinking coffee all my adult life - so no more late, etc at coffee shops. I'll stick with home ground coffee.


Suzhookem

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2014, 11:44:21 AM »
I'm still trying to get my consumption of various things right. It's fermentation right now and I just bought a bag of Ruta Maya coffee beans at Costco, also sold at Amazon. Ruta Maya is here in Austin but right now they don't have a place I could go and talk to anyone as Austin rents have driven them out. They are currently buying a building. So I am the proud owner of a big bag of organically grown high altitude coffee and a grinder that I bought at Starbucks. I still have a partial bag that was roasted here so I'm not sure when I'll get into the Ruta Maya coffee but am looking forward to it. I'm a work in progress 😁

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2014, 02:03:11 PM »
Suzhookem.

I really find that the organic, high altitude coffee seems smoother, has less acid and caffeine.  At least this is what I am experiencing.  I don't feel jittery or have a sour stomach from this premium stuff.  Reading David Asprey's web site about commercial canned coffee got me started.  I will never go back to supermarket brands if I can help it!

Commercial coffees are grown with artificial fertilizers and chemicals pesticides much like the rest of our food supply.  I'm satisfied with drinking less coffee, perhaps because i don't have low blood sugar crashes anymore.  Thank you Dr. Davis!

richard88

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2014, 05:40:26 PM »
I have problems, probably some sort of inflammatory stuff, they tested me for high antibodies, and I drink ridiculous amounts of coffee...I cant stop I need it. but I know its hurting me . I don't know how to stop, caffeine is a hell of a drug

Loekie

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2014, 01:39:44 AM »
I have problems, probably some sort of inflammatory stuff, they tested me for high antibodies, and I drink ridiculous amounts of coffee...I cant stop I need it. but I know its hurting me . I don't know how to stop, caffeine is a hell of a drug

It took me three months. After that, you can try do drink no more than 4 cups a day. It is possible. Try to drink it black at home.
Wheat free since february 2012

VibeRadiant

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2014, 07:07:21 PM »
can you switch to half regular and half decaf?

HungryinTN

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2014, 09:38:46 AM »
If you're not already, try buying higher-quality beans and grind them fresh at home.  A lot of the addiction-like symptoms (and negative symptoms in general) you are having could actually be from the mold and toxins. 

Bob Niland (Boundless)

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2014, 05:55:08 PM »
> ... symptoms in general) you are having could actually be from the mold and toxins.

See also:
http://authoritynutrition.com/the-mycotoxins-in-coffee-myth/

HungryinTN

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2014, 07:17:32 PM »
I was just reading on that site, as a matter of fact.  It's very crabby about a lot of things.  In general, my response to most nutrition books and articles is to experiment on myself.  When I drink high-altitude organic coffee, I feel great.  I can also skip it and feel fine.  When I consume other coffee, I get jittery and have a hard time breathing.  If I have it a couple of days in a row (as when I travel if I forget to pack what I need to make my own), I feel withdrawal symptoms.   I don't necessarily believe all the hype of the citizen-scientists, and I certainly don't accept major studies at face value, but I know what my body tells me!  For that reason, I recommend that anyone who feels like they have a bad reaction to coffee to try switching.  My boyfriend can drink a pot (or two) of cheap coffee a day and (claim to) feel fine (then again, is normal is feeling like garbage, so...).  I always thought I couldn't handle coffee until I tried better beans, like I had some innate intolerance to caffeine.  And I still won't drink any after noon because I am not a good sleeper anyway.  But 1-2 cups every morning and I'm set. 

Redhead65

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2014, 10:47:02 PM »
Before wheat belly I used to drink at least 6 mugs of coffee a day. It was insane. At first I did not notice the change, but especially in the last 8 weeks or so I noticed that I practically do not need coffee and that I can afford to drink coffee only when I want to.  And a coffee-free day is also okay for me.

I have got a top quality grinder from Italy at home. It is 12 years old and never failed on me. So I have not bought any pre-ground coffee since then.

The roasting temperature also has a big effect on coffee. Slow-roasted coffee (175F) is much more gentle and contains less alcrylamid than standard-type coffee that is roasted at 750F (at least here in Germany).

elsa

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #27 on: April 21, 2015, 02:13:04 PM »
well this confirms something ive thought ive known intuitively for a long time! Thank you for the links!

alexwaston

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2016, 01:13:37 AM »
I am going to switch to an organic brand of coffee, anyone have suggestions regarding the brand?

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2016, 05:00:09 AM »
Alex,


There are endless brands in most stores.  Organic, shade grown, high altitude, slow roasted etc. are key words to look for.  The darker roasts like french roast are roasted longer and the longer roast time is supposed to be less acidic.  I prefer a medium roast.  I grind the beans myself.  Some authorities, like Dr. Alan Christianson feel that the mold and fungus sprays are burnt off during the roasting process.  I don't agree.  I know that once I changed from 8 O'clock beans to the premium beans, I found there was less caffeine, smoother taste and no odd reactions which i had finally attributed to the mold and fungus residue.  They key is finding a brand you like.  If you don't have a coffee grinder or a coffeepot which grinds the beans for you, try to buy one.  They can be found for about $15 or so. Freshly ground beans really do make a difference in the flavors.  If you use only pre-ground coffee, then check the dates printed somewhere on the package.  Pre-ground coffee gets stale very quickly, impairing the flavor.  Beans stay fresh a lot longer.  Also, it is not recommended to freeze coffee.  Keep any supply wrapped tightly in your pantry to prevent air infiltration.  Use any coffee at room temperature only.  This helps the oils to be as flavorful as possible.  Also, the beans in those large bins are not the freshest.  It is usually better to purchase the packages where there is less air circulation making the coffee stale.


Hope this helps!










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Re: coffee and gluten sensitivity
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