This forum is created by people who follow the Wheat Belly Diet, as a place to communicate with each other about various topics. Please note that this site is a user created site, and not one of Dr. Davis' sites.

Author Topic: The MTHFR gene mutation  (Read 10110 times)

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
The MTHFR gene mutation
« on: January 25, 2014, 08:05:36 PM »
I just did a 5 hour class on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation, and how that effects the methylation cycle.  Wow.   There are several different MTHFR mutations.

Interestingly, about 40% of people have a form of this gene mutation, and this can have a major effect on health, as certain biochemical pathways are blocked.   Basically folic acid cannot convert to it's active form.  The good news is that there are different nutritional and supplemental protocols that are very effective in dealing with this mutation.

So for those of you who just are not feeling well, even though you are doing everything right, you might do a DNA test to see if you need to add additional supplementation to your diet.   You can get a DNA test at http://23andme.com  .

Dr. Lynch is considered to be an expert on this topic.   Here's a page on his website that lists all the health conditions this gene mutation can cause:

http://mthfr.net/mthfr-mutations-and-the-conditions-they-cause/2011/09/07/

Bob Niland (Boundless)

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 678
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 11:37:54 AM »
If you had obvious symptoms of something that might be a consequence of C677T and/or A1298C mutations, is there any reason why you wouldn't just try taking some methyl folate supplement?

It's available OTC, and even Dr. Lynch advises that it's safe in low doses.

It seems sort of like celiac. You can see the consequences by adjusting a dial in your diet. Is it worth the extra expense to discover exactly why you need to pay attention to that dial?

Barbara from New Jersey

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2168
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 12:41:27 PM »
Boundless,


It seems that changing your B vitamins is just the first step.  Each person has a variety of mutations which express themselves eventually in various diseases and symptoms.  Tweaking that dial exactly for your health problems seems a bit more complicated and requires a more exact diet.  Just like a diabetic needs a diet and medications designed for their exact problem, the genetic mutations express themselves differently in everyone.  Most people are pretty sick and need help in discovering what to eat, not to eat, what to supplement and what is not needed.  Medications need to be appropriately adjusted.  It isn't just the methyl folate that will help you to get better, like it isn't just not eating wheat this is a lot more complicated than that!

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 01:30:12 PM »
It's actually quite complicated, and no protocol fits all people.


Here's another good resource:


http://geneticgenie.org/methylation-analysis-example/

Lynda (Fl)

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1185
  • Wheat-free for 4 years
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 07:37:51 AM »
Rita, would the patient have a normal folate level in blood tests?

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2014, 04:32:32 PM »
Lynda -  I'll have to check on that.


In the meantime, here's a copy/paste of a response that Dr. Lynch gave to someone on his question/answer page when someone asked about why all defects don't create the same symptoms.  I though the answer was interesting:


Great question.
The MTHFR defects are in different areas of the MTHFR gene.
The 1298 MTHFR enzyme mainly functions in the BH4 cycle while the 677 MTHFR enzyme mainly functions in the Methionine cycle.
This is a major reason if not the main reason why those with different MTHFR defects present with different symptoms.

Those with A1298C mutations do well with 5-MTHF typically but they also need more than that as the BH4 cycle is critical to reduce ammonia levels, produce nitric oxide and produce neurotransmitters.
Those with C677T mutations do well with 5-MTHF typically but they also need methylcobalamin, TMG, B6, B2. The methionine cycle is needed to reduce homocysteine levels, produce nutrients to support detoxification, provide methyl groups for their numerous functions, produce energy and DNA/RNA repair.
There are other reasons why the two MTHFR defects dont create the same symptoms:
1) Some people may also have mutations in their MTR, COMT, CBS, MAO A, VDR genes which alter the use of 5-MTHF. These mutations compound the problem and further complicate the biochemistry immensely.

2) Heavy metals play a huge factor in enzyme function not just mutations. If an enzyme is in the presence of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, arsenic or others this enzyme may be significantly affected this is why children who have the MTHFR mutation should not get vaccinated! This is a MAJOR link between autism and vaccinations this is one of the reasons why some children are severely affected by the vaccinations and others are not.
3) Diet and lifestyle. If one leads a life which is active, joyous and eating healthy foods, their symptoms are going to be completely different than those lives who are the opposite: stressful, sedentary and the processed foods junkie.
The body is VERY complex and there are biochemical reactions going on every millisecond 100′s or 1000′s or millions of them. Each one of these reactions utilizes various nutrients and if any one nutrient is low or the enzyme is being destroyed by heavy metals and other environmental toxins, simply taking 5-MTHF is not going to cut it.
This is why those with MTHFR mutations can be very difficult to treat.
People can be very difficult to treat. Period.
Adding the complexity of MTHFR gene mutation, which has very important roles in the human body, makes it even more difficult.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 04:44:48 PM by Rita »

Lynda (Fl)

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1185
  • Wheat-free for 4 years
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2014, 12:24:20 PM »
Thanks, Rita.  That stuff is so complex, it makes you wonder how they ever understand it.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2014, 02:11:35 PM »
Here's a good presentation on it:



Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2014, 02:38:03 PM »
And in the above video, Dr. Lynch refers to Dr. Bruce Lipton, who is an microbiologist and an expert on epigenetics.   Basically, you can control how your genes are expressed.   



Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2014, 08:40:59 PM »
I just got my 23andme raw results back and ran them through Genetic Genie.    Looks like I'm homozygous ( 2 copies)  for several mutations, including the a1298c  mutation.   This explains all the pregnancy losses I had.   

So this is the protocol recommended by Dr. Lynch on a1298c :

http://mthfr.net/mthfr-a1298c-mutation-some-information-on-a1298c-mthfr-mutations/2011/11/30/


All in all, I think for me, the main thing is to take the active form of B12 and folate (methyl B12 and methyl folate) and stay away from folic acid (the synthetic stuff)
« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 08:45:23 PM by Rita »

Bob Niland (Boundless)

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 678
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2014, 06:19:56 AM »
Rita > I just got my 23andme raw results back and ...

Is there a list anywhere of exactly what results 23&me reports? It wasn't obvious on their site.

For example, do they report Apo E ?

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2014, 07:35:57 AM »
23andme gives you your ancestral information.  They can't give health info anymore, but they have an API where the raw data hooks right into some other services with a simple login.

So after I got my results, I went to both http://geneticgenie.org  and  http://promethease.com  .  Basically you go to those sites and login with your 23andme login.

The information is amazing, although promethease is a little overwhelming, as there is a lot of data there.   You definitely want to watch their video as you wait the 20 minutes for the report to be generated.   In promethease, there are over 17,000 things that you can look at.


Quote
For example, do they report Apo E ?
I did find ApoE on my promethease.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 07:44:10 PM by Rita »

Jan in Key West

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2081
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2016, 05:53:38 AM »
I know this is an old thread but......my granddaughter, Daisy, was born on Friday and Saturday it was discovered she has a submucous cleft palate. In doing research, there seems to be a genetic factor in cleft babies (whether cleft lip or hard/soft palate deformities) I found information regarding the MTHFR gene mutation contributing to maternal folate deficiency. To my knowledge, my DIL, while celiac, has never been tested for this gene mutation but I have a feeling, if she has the mutation, the pre-natal vitamins, which were probably full of folic acid might have built up in her system. She eats organically, healthy, low carb foods but will not eat red meat.....only fish and chicken. Now am wondering if this is, yet again, another argument for eating red meat! I'm still basking in the joy of this little angel but know she may have to go through some medical procedures in the future.

Barbara from New Jersey

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2168
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2016, 06:25:44 AM »
Jan,

Congrats on your new grandchild!   ;D

The way around the MTHFR mutation is to make sure your B vitamin supplements have "methyl" written before the folate and B-12.  This is the natural form.  Dr. Lynch's web site has lots of good information so it is worth looking at for easy to understand explanations and how to deal with this genetic defect.

Besides red meat, pastured eggs* are also a good source for natural B vitamins, among many other nutrients.  These eggs are worth the higher price. especially for the 40%+ part of the population which has the MTHFR defects.  You really have to read each label of vitamins and other "enriched" foods because nearly all contain the synthetic Folic Acid and B-12.  CountryLife Co-enzyme B-Complex and Life Extension are two of the brands I found with the methylated forms.  I was surprised that so few brands of supplements address this issue. 

Those people with this mutation need to supplement the folate and B-12 as well as eat foods containing these nutrients.


* eggs labeled "free range" means that the hens have access to the outside a minimum of 5 minutes per day and that access may be through a small door which leads to a cement slab.  "Pastured" means that the hens are mainly raised in a pasture with grass and bugs and have indoor shelter for ight time or inclement weather.  If you aren't sure of the quality of your eggs or chicken, go to www.buyingpoultry.com for their opinion.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2016, 10:00:35 PM »
Congratulations Jan!   


I worry about all that folic acid that is given to pregnant mothers, when it is estimated that around 40-50% of the population has the MTHFR mutation and can't metabolize the fake stuff.  It just builds up.


I think one of the best sources for natural folate is sprouts.   I love growing sunflower sprouts.  They are absolutely delicious.   


The methyl vitamins are an option, but I think you need to be careful for anything that is methylated.  It's so easy to overdue something when it's not in whole food form.




Barbara from New Jersey

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2168
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2016, 04:40:19 AM »
Rita,


That is exactly the problem!  Since most of the foods we have available are deficient in the vitamins and minerals we need and not all of us can grow our own sprouts, then B vitamin supplementation needed.  I agree that MTHFR is are very complicated.  While this genetic anomaly is just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak, it just seems to me that the supplements can help until you build up your cellular reserves, improve your leaky gut issues and your gut biome.  The biggest problem is having these nutrients absorbed.  This decreases with age.  I doubt anyone will overdose on folate or B-12 unless they are taking far too many pills on a daily basis.


 

deanna in AR

  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1070
  • WF Sept. 2011
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2016, 04:57:46 PM »
Rita, how do you grow sunflower sprouts? Are they better for you than other kinds of sprouts.

Rita

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2427
  • A student of nutrition
    • View Profile
Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2016, 07:23:21 PM »
Here's a good video on how to do it.   I've been munching on sunflower sprouts all day.  They are so yummy!



Wheat Free Forum

Re: The MTHFR gene mutation
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2016, 07:23:21 PM »

Sponsored Links