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Author Topic: Sous Vide Cooking  (Read 5422 times)

Barbara from New Jersey

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Sous Vide Cooking
« on: February 03, 2014, 03:30:27 PM »
I recently came across a discussion of Sous Vide method of cooking.  Seems that Dr. Michael Eades developed the home model of this machine which cooks meat or veggies (vacuumed sealed in plastic) in water heated to a specific temperature.  Meats and poultry are cooked perfectly to your specification.  They are delicious, soft and need just a quick browning before serving.  He recommends browning in bubbly butter.  This method of cooking retains more of the nutrients.  You don't overcook and wind up with dry, stringy meat or poultry.

Dr. Eades discusses this in greater depth on his blog site. There is a video too.  I was very interested in this method as I knew that many of the famous restaurants use it for cooking their meats and poultry. Their meats are so tender and flavorful, which is basically why they are famous!  All because of sous vide cooking.

Has anyone here had experience with this machine? 
« Last Edit: February 03, 2014, 05:26:26 PM by Barbara from New Jersey »

Rita

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2014, 04:00:10 PM »
Found this video on it:

HungryinTN

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2014, 08:28:47 AM »
Do you have to cook it in plastic? That seems icky to me.  I'll stick with my sear-and-bake method, I think.  :-\

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2014, 10:25:19 AM »
Hungry,

The bags are made for for cooking in the warm water.  They do not give off any residue and are a polymer of some sort.  Dr. Michael Eades and his wife developed this machine for home owners to reproduce the superior results that fine restaurants achieve with meat.  Dr. Eades explains this on his blog site.  I think we can trust him to make sure the bags are safe!

This way of cooking breaks down the cell membrane and the meat becomes very tender.  You can cook it to any temperature you want: rare, medium rare, well or anything in between.  You "finish" the meat by grilling it or placing it in a hot fry pan with butter to sear it.  Any steak lover will tell you that the better steakhouses and restaurants cook their steaks this way. The steak is cooked at the same temperature all the way through, is very tender and very, very tasty.  Even when "rare", the center is firm and not raw.  I like the fact that I can have company and not have to tend to the grill except for the minute or two it takes to sear the steak.  If the weather is inclement, you can just pan sear rather than standing outside in the rain, snow or heat!

Vegetables are wonderful cooked this way too. 
« Last Edit: February 09, 2014, 11:00:13 AM by Barbara from New Jersey »

Rita

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2014, 01:59:37 PM »
This article is worth a read …  especially if you are concerned about the plastic.


http://nomnompaleo.com/post/12463202060/cooking-sous-vide-plastic-safety

Jan in Key West

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2014, 02:41:14 PM »
I've been trying to rid our lives of all plastic products for years....and it's extremely difficult (still love the zip locks!)  But I find the idea of the silicone bags interesting.....may have to try some.

Rita

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2014, 03:23:22 PM »
Here's an interesting study on the nutritional quality:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22568492




Quote
Phytochemicals (carotenoids, phenolic compounds, and ascorbic acid) and antioxidant capacity (measured by TEAC, FRAP, and TRAP assays) were evaluated on carrots and Brussels sprouts sous vide processed and then stored refrigerated for 1, 5, and 10 days and compared with the corresponding raw and oven-steamed products. Data showed that sous vide cooked carrots had higher amounts of carotenoids, phenolic compounds, and ascorbic acid than steamed products, and only a slight decrease of phenolic compounds was recorded during sous vide storage. Contrasting results were obtained on sous vide processed Brussels sprouts: higher carotenoid amounts and TEAC and TRAP values and lower phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, and FRAP values were exhibited by sous vide in comparison with steamed samples. Phytochemicals and TAC also decreased during Brussels sprout sous vide storage with the exception of carotenoids. The results of this study demonstrated that sous vide preparation can preserve and/or enhance the nutritional quality of carrots, which remain a good source of carotenoids also after long refrigerated storage, whereas the same treatment could be recommended as an alternative to oven-steaming in the preparation of Brussels sprouts for short-term maintenance to avoid a large ascorbic acid depletion.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2014, 03:29:36 PM »
Rita,


NomNomPaleo's article was written in Fall, 2011.  Sous vide bags are made of nylon or silicone or similar chemicals and do not leach.  Zip lock bags and similar are not recommended by Dr. Eades. 

Rita

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2014, 03:38:11 PM »
Does this look like the silicone bag you use Barbara?  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0049EU670

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2014, 05:05:28 PM »
Rita,

Yes, that is the bag.  I would not purchase it for cooking again.  The seal can get distorted in the microwave or steamer or sous vide.  It is also rather small and somewhat stiff.  SousVide has actually developed a bag that doesn't need a vacuum sealer and is reusable.  Look to the right of your Amazon site and you will see them. 

For refrigerated leftovers I use pyrex glass containers with lids.  They are heavy and tend to be cumbersome, but I like being able to actually see what is in the container!  Sometimes I use Zip Lock bags in the refrigerator or freezer.  They are made of polyethylene and would be safe for food storage.  They do soften at 195*F so I would be hesitant to use them in the microwave, steamer or boiling water.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2014, 07:28:02 PM by Rita »

richard88

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2014, 06:20:28 PM »
The "sous-vide" method is a blight on restaurants, born of laziness and a lack of genuine skills. Invariably accompanied by a "purée" of this and a "mousse" of that, it leaves the diner hoping for a straw, in addition to the usual cutlery, and needing to score a bag of pork scratching on their way home, as a reminder of flavour and the function of teeth.

BarbinNC

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2014, 12:12:35 PM »
Lol Richard, do tell us how you really feel!


I really haven't ever, to my knowledge, eaten anything that was prepared sous vide, but the plastic thing doesn't sound all that appetizing to me either.  But I am sure that things get very nice and tender.  Expensive though, for home use … and another thing sitting around on top of the counter!

Jan in Key West

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2014, 12:43:45 PM »
Michael Eades highly recommends the 'sous vide' and even though I love that guy dearly, due to the plastic thing, I can't go there. The company that makes the bags, insists that they don't contain BPA but when asked, so far they can't deny they contain BPS which is more toxic. I'm trying to ramp down our use of plastics, which is difficult at best.....so will muddle along cooking the old fashioned way.


I live on the ocean 8 months out of the year and if you could see the amount of plastic that I see wash up every day, you'd soon stop using one-time-use plastic too. It's just not environmentally cohesive. We need to be more aware.

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2014, 12:50:26 PM »
BarbinNC,


If you have ever eaten meat in an upscale restaurant, chances are the steak or chops were prepared sous vide.  Tough cuts of meat like brisket,
(corned beef, pastrami or not pickled) become superbly tender, even the cheap supermarket brands.  The grassfed beef and pastured pork can be tough because of limited marbling.


When cooked to temperature, they always come out PERFECT.  You do need to brown them on a grill or fry pan.  The special vacuum bags are made  of non-leachable materials like nylon so there isn't any worry about contamination.  ZipLock bags are not recommended!   Poached eggs for a crowd are easy and come out perfectly for eggs benedict.  No worry about over cooking.  You can even make bone broth in it and cook the broth at a simmer for days.  The machine will hold the temperature you set it at precisely.  The bone broth is made in the machine by removing the grids.  You then wash out the inside which is stainless steel. 

Richard88 has some ax to grind in my opinion.  He obviously hasn't used one.  It is a large rectangle, but light weight to move.  I like my steak  thick and medium rare.  Haven't had a problem preparing the lean grass fed beef since i bought the machine.   Dr. Michael Eades developed this for home use.  While pricey, you can often find one used on ebay.  With summer bbq's, I can now cook the meats in advance and place them on the grill only to brown.  No need to stand outside in the heat for more than a few minutes.  They still come out perfect!

BarbinNC

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2014, 01:03:05 PM »
Well, now I'm intrigued … and I know what you mean, I have wondered how they do the meat so perfectly in restaurants, esp. the grass fed steaks etc.  I can see how the juices would be retained and vitamins and minerals also. 


On a similar note, I love roasting meats like that ver slowly in the oven, not as perfect I'm sure, but I sometimes cover pans with foil, to retain the moisture and slow roast on very low settings for hours, and meat comes out so soft and falling off the bones ribs etc.


So my guess is I would enjoy having one of those contraptions! ;)

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2014, 01:08:16 PM »
BarbinNC,


The sous vide machine does not heat up your kitchen, which is great in the summer.   :)

BarbinNC

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2014, 01:12:39 PM »
Oh - that's a big plus!  I might really look into this, tell me more ….  ;D

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2014, 02:24:48 PM »
A local supermarket has grass fed bee and lamb from Australia at very reasonable prices.  The butcher will cut a rib roast into 1.5 - 2" steaks.
I season add a pat of butter and vacuum seal them.  Sometimes I cook them in advance and then freeze or sometimes I just freeze.  Those already sous vided, I let defrost and then grill to sear and heat up.  Those not cooked, I sous vide to medium rare, remove from the nylon sealer and sear on a hot grill, about a minute or 2 per side.  For people who want their meat cooked more, you just leave it on the grill for a bit longer.  Grilling veggies takes more time than the meat. 

I've made beef stew using grass fed chuck roast by browning the meat first, then browning the onions in ghee or gf butter and adding my spices wine and other vegetables into the pouches and seal. 

There are several desserts like creme brulee' you can make foolproof in your machine.  You raise the rack with any grate so that your container or ramekins sit in the water.  Since there isn't any motion in the heated water like other water bath methods, the filling you pour into the cups/container sets just right at the perfect temperature.  You can use a kitchen torch to flambe' if you want.

You can hard or soft boil eggs perfectly.  Even pasteurize them!  There are many recipes calling for raw eggs or yolks.  No need for concern using your sous vide.  The whites may take longer to whip and become milky looking, but you have killed the pathogens without killing the nutrients, much like that low temperature pasteurization of milk.

The vacuum sealing and slow cooking enhances all the flavors.  Using good quality spices and salt makes a big difference in flavor.  Even McCormicks
Montreal Seasoning, which is mediocre in my opinion, turns a sous vided steak into restaurant quality.   

Also, I've saved lots more money than the machine costs because we don't eat out nearly as much as before.   Dinner is easy and ready in less time than and is never over or under cooked.  The veggies take longer than the meat!  I know exactly what ingredients, including oils, I am using.  Delicious, well prepared food has become simple without heating up the kitchen and I have been freed from being in the kitchen for hours. 

BarbinNC

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2014, 02:32:34 PM »
Thanks so much, Barbara - You sound like my kind of cook, and I am sold!  Just have to see where I can get one that isn't going to break the bank.  I love that kind of cooking, just hadn't really looked into it closely, because of the pouches.  Where do you get them?

Barbara from New Jersey

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2014, 02:46:15 PM »
BarbinNC,


The pouches are sold everywhere vacuum sealers are sold.  Most pouches are made from nylon so that freezer burn is avoided.  People who hunt and freeze their meat want the protection of quality bags.  The manufacturer will indicate if the bag is suitable for sous vide.  Keep in mind that usually you will not cook anything at a temperature higher than perhaps 195*F.  Sous Vide web site sells them, kitchen stores sell them and there are plenty available on line.  You pay more than zip lock bags, but you are getting a much better quality bag and your food will not get freezer burn and you can place the same bag into the water bath for cooking (defrost first!).


Take your time and look at this in a good kitchen store.  Look on ebay. 



BarbinNC

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Re: Sous Vide Cooking
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2014, 02:48:42 PM »
Thank you again, I'm sure now that I'm aware, I will be seeing these everywhere I go! ;)

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