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Main Discussion Area => Food Elements => Topic started by: HungryinTN on August 05, 2013, 12:22:39 PM

Title: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 05, 2013, 12:22:39 PM
So I keep hearing about all of the wonderful benefits of bone broth, and I've decided to give it a try.  This will be my first venture into meat-based cooking in my whole life, so I need a little hand holding.  So...what do I do?  I am going to go to a local butcher tomorrow to see about getting bones (they are only open Tues-Sat), I don't know yet whether or not they have grass fed, but I don't know exactly how important that is with broth, and I mostly have NO IDEA what I'm doing.  I mean seriously, I grew up in a meat-free household.  I've never seen meat prepared.  Talk to me like I'm a kindergartner.  What should I ask for?  Bones of what animal?  What do I do to it when I've got it home?  How much will how many bones make?  I've read several recipes online but I feel like there is a certain amount of foreknowledge assumed by all of them, because I am great at recipes but I feel completely lost with the whole bone broth concept. Thanks all!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 05, 2013, 04:59:14 PM
Hungry.....Try to get pastured animal bones if at all possible. The 'bone broth purists' (whoever they are) recommend grass-fed/sustainable animal bones. I think probably everyone has their own system for making bone broth and I'm pretty new to this but will throw in my two cents for this very worthy cause.


I make beef bone broth using the largest representation from the animal.....from head to toe. It's typical to find 'soup bones' from most butchers....they are usually the larger bones and have been sawed into smaller portions.....so start there.  Ask if they have anything else that you could use in making bone broth and they may surprise you with something interesting. I often add some organ meats....but only use those if the animal was pastured raised. Roast the bones with olive oil for an hour at 375-400.....put in your stockpot....cover with filtered water.....add 1/4 cup vinegar.....and simmer for 3 days.  Some people add veggies but I don't do that anymore.....maybe an onion but that's it....just the bones. I've read that corn fed bones may produce a 'scum' that needs to be syphoned off....but I haven't had that experience with pasture raised/pasture finished beef. I've managed to develop a great relationship with my farmer (I'm blessed!) and he saves me lots of cool stuff....knuckles, joints, parts of the skull, hooves.......but I have yet to ask for the eyeballs (which are supposedly really high in Vit A)! :o


Chicken bone broth....I just use a carcass from a chicken I roasted, add some chicken feet (again, from my butcher) some organ things....and cook for 24 hours....a great gelatinous broth!


You can't make mistakes.....just try it.....and good luck! It's one of the best things I've done....other than ridding myself of wheat!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 05, 2013, 06:06:28 PM
Yeah...I don't see myself going for any organs or eyeballs yet.  But hopefully I can stomach some bones.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 08, 2013, 03:04:58 PM
FYI.....I wrote Sally Fallon at Weston Price in July inquiring about the use of a pressure cooker in making bone broth and whether they had any nutritional data regarding the differences. I just received an answer from her and while they do not have specific nutritional data, she does not recommend using a pressure cooker because  bones (especially the cartilage) need a long slow simmer to extract it's benefits.  So, I'm returning my pressure cooker.....
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 10, 2013, 04:31:04 PM
My induction burner arrived yesterday....boy that was fast! Roasting a 'Savoy' chicken for dinner tonight and will use the carcass, along with some roasted chicken feet....and simmer for 30 hours for chicken bone broth......
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on August 10, 2013, 04:41:41 PM
Quote
will use the carcass, along with some roasted chicken feet..


Jan... you're such a carnivore!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 10, 2013, 04:50:48 PM
Rita....YES I AM!  When I went to my farmer a week ago, his son said, "Dad, the bone lady is here".   Think I should change my moniker?  ;)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Lynda (Fl) on August 11, 2013, 02:53:13 PM
That's too funny, Jan!  You could be Jan, The Bone Lady in Key West?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 11, 2013, 03:52:53 PM
Actually, I'm Jan, the bone lady from Indiana in the summer....but will be back down in the fall....then I'll have to IMPORT my bones....not too many pastured cows running around the island,  just chickens!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 11, 2013, 08:07:29 PM
Well, I did it!  I bought some grass-fed beef soup bones at the farmer's market yesterday and put them in the crockpot tonight with onions and a boatload of seasoning (garlic, thyme, cumin) plus some ACV.  I got some advice from family members who told me to err on the side of overseasoned the first time since I won't be used to the flavor of meat (the very few times I have tried it or accidentally eaten it in my life, it honestly tasted like death to me).  If nothing else, I can give it to my boyfriend to get him some extra nourishment while he struggles to make it to his next paycheck on the university's bizzarro pay schedule (he's an adjunct professor).  I will post when I know how it turned out! 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 11, 2013, 08:16:18 PM
(I hope I did it right!)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 12, 2013, 04:45:55 AM
Hungry....Congrats on venturing down the bone broth lane! What I found was the end product really doesn't have a heavy meat taste, in fact, it's fairly mild. Look forward to hearing how it turns out!


p.s.  Have you read Lierree Keith's book, "The Vegetarian Myth"?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 12, 2013, 08:39:06 AM
I haven't.  I've read some academic reviews of it, and basically it doesn't sound like the small amount of good research in it can tell me anything I don't already know (she cites Wikipedia, for pete's sake!).  I think it's good that the book is out there, and it could help some people get away from a destructive lifestyle, but I'm living out my own vegetarian myth.  I've suspected for years that my vegetarian lifestyle was doing more harm than good and more and more research is coming out confirming that.  That said, it is so deeply embedded in my identity that it isn't going to be easy to change.  Plus despite evolution, my body hasn't ever had the chance to develop some of the enzymes necessary to digest meat efficiently because I have never really been exposed to it, even in the womb.  When I've had small exposure incidents in my life, it's made me pretty sick.  Baby steps! 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 12, 2013, 02:13:12 PM
Hungry,


There are many brands of animal based digestive enzymes for you to try.  Start with eating/drinking the bone broth! 
Perhaps some of your local health food stores have sample packs of the enzymes.  You might inquire so that they can ask their supplier to send some. This way you can try different brands and formulas without spending a lot of $.  I always see a basket of these samples at the privately owned shops, not the national chains.  The shop owners are eager for your business and should be able to guide you through the maize. Worth a try!


The longer you are grain/sugar free, the easier it should be to adapt to eating meats. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 12, 2013, 04:52:53 PM
The owners of my only local are vegan and a little snobbish about it.  I've asked them for products in the past but to no avail.  I'm hoping by starting slowly with the bone broth, and having added more animal fats to my diet in general, I can skip the pill-taking step of enzyme building. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 12, 2013, 05:04:50 PM
Hungry,

Lots of vegans are that way!  Lean and mean.  They don't realize how much business they push away because of their smug attitude.
Wishing you a smooth and uneventful transition.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 12, 2013, 06:49:24 PM
My local grocer in KW is vegan/vegetarian but was amenable to ordering me Applegate bacon, among other things. "Help Yourself"....google them in KW...great place! I gave them a copy of WB in May and when I return in Oct. am anxious to see if it made a difference....although they have really been tremendously supportive as I've held to my 'low carb' diet.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 13, 2013, 07:53:41 AM
Finishing up a 40 hour chicken bone broth....using the induction burner and 20 qt. stockpot...this may be my best attempt yet! The flavor is outstanding!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 13, 2013, 07:58:15 AM
I am going to cool and skim my broth tonight.  So far it smells...meaty.  I forgot how much I hated the smell of beef cooking.  I had to ban my ex-husband from making it when I was in the house because it made me positively nauseated.  We'll see how this goes...
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 13, 2013, 10:06:04 AM
Hi Jan,


The high quality ingredients and the slow simmer makes the difference.  Amazing isn't it!


This is why Linda sought out the old crockpots which cooked from 140-165*F.  Can't hardly find them now, so the induction burner is a good substitute. 


Glad this worked out for you!.   :)



Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 13, 2013, 10:15:49 AM

This is why Linda sought out the old crockpots which cooked from 140-165*F.  Can't hardly find them now, so the induction burner is a good substitute. 


Hmm...How old does a crockpot need to be to cook at the right temperature?  I've had mine for about ten years. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 13, 2013, 10:44:07 AM
I believe it is in the 165*-215*F cycle.  Better than nothing if you can't adjust the temperature on your stove top to 150*F.
Or, if no one is home for a long period of time and you don't want to leave the broth cooking while you are away.


Perhaps Linda R. can give you a better guesstimate.  The older ones are smaller and i believe the insert is not removable. 





Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on August 13, 2013, 03:19:03 PM
I believe it is in the 165*-215*F cycle.  Better than nothing if you can't adjust the temperature on your stove top to 150*F.
Or, if no one is home for a long period of time and you don't want to leave the broth cooking while you are away.


Perhaps Linda R. can give you a better guesstimate.  The older ones are smaller and i believe the insert is not removable.


I actually find the older models on ebay. I look for those like the 3 1/2 Qt or the 5 Qt. They sold back in the 70's, 80's and 90's and generally have just a simple High, Low and Off setting. No other fancy stuff, no programmable settings, etc. Even the Warm setting is generally newer. Some have removable stoneware inserts, some don't.
If you go there, ask as many questions of the seller as possible and inquire as to the age of the appliance. It is amazing how many are still available and how lovingly they have been kept all these years. A lot of them come from estate sales.

Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on August 13, 2013, 03:29:31 PM
Example


This is a Rival CrockPot Model 3100,  3 1/2 Qt.  I am biased and always look for Rival, I think they are the best.




The 2nd one is on sale right now for $7.95, plus shipping. Sorry about the crappy photo.


Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 13, 2013, 04:31:37 PM
Crock pots, old or new, won't work for me because I make large quantities and need at least a 20 qt. capacity.....a turkey roaster would work but I really liked using the induction burner and didn't mind leaving it on when I left the house for extended periods.


I bought an immersion blender today on Amazon....it's got attachments so it may render my Ninja obsolete.  It's scary how easy it is to spend money with only one click of the keyboard!!!!!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 13, 2013, 06:01:44 PM
Jan,


You are a bit late to the internet shopping party!  People even use their cell phones or iPads to price shop a specific item while walking through a store.  They then go to the manager and show the price to get a match +10% off. 
Usually they get the discount.


I try to research as much as possible on the internet to locate products or even read the labels for WB acceptable items.  If necessary, I email the company.  Usual response time is within 24 hours. 


This is not Home Shopping Club anymore!  No need to sit in front of the TV for hours.   You can order nearly anything and have it delivered to your front door, all by filling in the form and your credit card #.  The only problem I have is sometimes I don't really know what I want and have to see the item, like a lighting fixture.   8)

Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 13, 2013, 06:08:02 PM
So I got home from work today and all of the liquid - which was nearly full when I left this morning - was mostly gone.  Does this mean my "low" setting is too high, or that I can't leave it for eight hours while I'm at work?  Also, should I be worried that it could have oxidized? 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 13, 2013, 06:12:43 PM
No, add more water.  Cover the pot so it doesn't evaporate as much.  Your broth is just condensed.  Try to lower the temperature a bit so it is on a simmer, not a slow boil.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 13, 2013, 11:17:32 PM
Okay.  I roasted a chicken for the first time.
Came out pretty tasty.  Now I've put the bones
into a pot and filled it with water and have been
cooking it for about 2 hours. 


Can I stop cooking it overnight and then resume
in the morning?  I'd rather not leave a pot on the
stove cooking all night or when I'm at work.


Do you pour or skim off the fat before using? 


I tried once before to make cow bone broth and it
tasted bad to me.  I'd sure like to try one that
others are saying tastes good, to see what the
fuss is all about.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 14, 2013, 04:13:16 AM
Bill,
Remember to add some vinegar to the broth....it helps extract the nutrients from the bones.  Using the bones from one chicken, I'd add at least a few tablespoons. Chicken bone broth requires, at the minimum, 24 hours of continuous low heat to leach.....beef bones require 72 hours. There are some 'bone broth enthusiasts that make a 'perpetual' broth that go on for weeks.


Since starting this process in May, I've experimented with several different methods....using a crock pot (low setting was too hot).....electric turkey roaster (it was old and died on me half-way through).....large stockpot on gas stove (worked well).....all these methods made me a little uneasy for the same reasons you stated, being asleep or away from home and leaving an appliance on. This week I used an induction burner (low setting) with a large stockpot and made a  2 day chicken bone broth that was outstanding....and it was much less intimidating to leave on for an extended period of time. The only other alternative is to use the oven on a low setting.....I haven't tried that one but many do.


When the broth is done, I turn off the heat and let it cool.....stick the whole pot in the fridge.....the fat hardens and I remove some of it....then I filter it through a fine wire mesh....and put it in glass jars to freeze.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 14, 2013, 04:47:50 AM
Bill,


Chicken STOCK is cooked for a just a few hours.  BONE BROTH needs to cook for at least 24 hours.  The idea is to be able to simmer the bones and skin long enough to leech out the collagen and other nutrients from the bones.  If you are uncomfortable leaving the pot cooking while away from the house or overnight, then try to do this for as long a time as possible. 


Some people use veggies and spices to flavor the resulting broth.  Some people don't until the broth is finished cooking.
Most strain the broth and remove the fat that settles on the top.


I will strain the broth multiple times if I want a clear soup or consommé.  I will strain it only once if I am making any other kind of soup.


When cooking this on a stove top, and I had to leave, I would make sure all the windows were closed to prevent a breeze taking out your flame.  The pot should be filled to the brim and covered so the contents don't evaporate while you are away or asleep.  The key to successful bone broth is the apple cider vinegar and long slow simmering at 140-160*F.  An electric cooktop should be on the lowest setting to bring the liquid to the right temperature. 


You can check the temperature by holding any thermometer in the water until you get a reading to enable you to adjust the heat level.  Also, when you are finished cooking the broth, you may want to raise the heat to bring it to a boil.  Let it cool, remove the carcass, etc. then strain and refrigerate or freeze.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 14, 2013, 12:17:08 PM
So I cooled it off and put it into the fridge
overnight.  Then started cooking it again this
morning.  It's been cooking a total of 4 hours now
but I have to go to work.


Does it have any bone goodness in it yet?  At
this rate, it'll take many days to get to 24
hours of cooking time.


Anybody know what the cost of the cooking
fuel is for this type of thing?  24 hours at x#
of $ per hour?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 14, 2013, 12:41:38 PM
This is a low temp cooking.  Whatever your fuel source is, it won't be a noticeable cost.  I would venture to guess that the electric crockpot or induction burner is the least expensive. Like leaving a light bulb on.   Propane would be the most expensive.



Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 14, 2013, 02:28:30 PM
Bill,
How do you feel about leaving your oven on low while you're asleep or away at work? That might be a solution....using a dutch oven, experiment with the temp controls and see what works, that is.... if you're more comfortable using the oven.  I'm not sure what disrupting the cooking process does to the integrity of the broth, it might not have any consequence at all. Keep us posted.....I love bone broth stories and I don't think you can  make mistakes!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 14, 2013, 05:15:38 PM
Okay...the broth is strained and in the refrigerator...now what?  I don't think I can do anything with it tonight because the air hasn't been on in my apartment for a while and I live in the South (I share a unit with two other apartments and the downstairs apartment has control - way too hot to cook or eat hot broth, especially after an eleven hour day at work!).  I strained it and refrigerated it last night.  Will it keep in the fridge for a day or two till I can get something done about it? 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 14, 2013, 06:21:54 PM
Hungry....yes it will keep a day or so....but freeze it sooner, rather than later...use small containers if possible.  Good luck!  :)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 15, 2013, 11:29:33 AM
Okay, now it's been cooking for 9 hours.
I put it in the fridge every night.  In about
3 more days, it'll be bone broth,  Maybe.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 15, 2013, 03:48:26 PM
Bill,
Keep us posted on your broth journey....as long as you keep the broth cool between the times you're cooking it, and still do the 72 hours (or whatever your cooking goal),  I really  don't think there is a problem.  But if you're concerned about the interrupted cooking, you might consider writing Sally Fallon at the Weston Price Foundation and ask her opinion.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 16, 2013, 10:45:24 AM
Technical difficulties.  I can't work with it over
this weekend.


I guess I'll put it in the freezer.


It's now been cooking a total of 14 hours.


It needs 24 hours...really????
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 16, 2013, 02:30:35 PM
I think the way to tell if the broth has bone nutrients in it is if the broth jells when refrigerated and if the chicken bones are soft enough to crush or break with your hand.  The leached collagen is what makes it jell.  This comes from chickens that are organically fed, antibiotic free, pastured, etc.  Not much jell with store bought "factory" chickens. 



Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 16, 2013, 03:04:14 PM
Hmm.  I cooked my (allegedly) grass-fed, organically-raised cow bones for two and a half days and the broth didn't gel in the refrigerator...I have another batch of bones ready to go as soon as we eat all of the soup that I made from the broth.  I haven't been brave enough to try it yet, but my boyfriend had it for lunch today and said it was delicious.  I will probably have it for dinner. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 16, 2013, 03:49:33 PM
Update:  The soup is amazing.  I added just a little extra sea salt and sprinkled some Parmesan cheese on top and it doesn't taste like dead animal at all!  Hooray!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 16, 2013, 04:38:01 PM
Barbara said:


broth jells when refrigerated and if the chicken bones
are soft enough to crush or break with your hand

Thanks for that.  I'll check it out.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 16, 2013, 04:40:25 PM
Hungry....great going on the bone broth!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 16, 2013, 05:06:08 PM
Bill....it's usually a good idea to crack your bones beforehand, beef or chicken, as it helps expose the marrow....you can use a seafood utensil, or a hammer, or even a pair of pliers....and if it's cooked long enough, it will gel. I don't think you can make mistakes with bone broth.....even if not cooked for extended periods.....it's still good stuff!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 16, 2013, 05:16:06 PM
Hungry.....maybe think of it this way.....that animal ate something you COULD NOT EAT and turned it into something that you COULD.....it's a viable & working ecosystem! It's all about our thankfulness.....
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on August 16, 2013, 06:56:18 PM
Oh I completely agree.  My entire thinking about diet and our role in the ecosystem has done a complete 180 recently.  Back when my mother became a vegetarian, her meat options were really pretty limited.  But the meat industry was, and is, something worth protesting.  But I feel confident giving my money to local farmers who know the value of well-raised livestock.  My new lifestyle aligns with my personal value system much better than my old diet did in so many ways.  I create so little garbage now.  My food doesn't have to travel long distances on fuel-guzzling eighteen-wheelers.  I'm not giving my money to big ag or big industry, or to the legislators who have been bought by them.  By eating the way that I do, I get to vote against the things that I find repugnant in the most powerful way possible - with my wallet. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 16, 2013, 07:08:37 PM
Hungry....very well stated....it's all about our 'gratefullness'.....and that we are....
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on August 16, 2013, 08:07:19 PM
Oh I completely agree.  My entire thinking about diet and our role in the ecosystem has done a complete 180 recently.  Back when my mother became a vegetarian, her meat options were really pretty limited.  But the meat industry was, and is, something worth protesting.  But I feel confident giving my money to local farmers who know the value of well-raised livestock.  My new lifestyle aligns with my personal value system much better than my old diet did in so many ways.  I create so little garbage now.  My food doesn't have to travel long distances on fuel-guzzling eighteen-wheelers.  I'm not giving my money to big ag or big industry, or to the legislators who have been bought by them. By eating the way that I do, I get to vote against the things that I find repugnant in the most powerful way possible - with my wallet.


Best comment I have read all week!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on August 19, 2013, 12:54:46 PM
Haven't been able to access the WFF for
the past couple of days.  Kept getting an
error message.  Anybody else have the
same problem?  I don't see any posts from
August 17th or 18th and today's the 19th.


Update on my bone broth.  It's still in the
freezer.  I'll get to it in the next few days.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 19, 2013, 01:41:34 PM
Bill,
The site has been down due to a programming problem.  Just came back on line today.  Lots of us thought it was our personal computers, but Rita blogged WB and informed us otherwise.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on August 22, 2013, 07:03:18 AM
Every year my sister (who is also WB) and I have a friendly and fun competition to see who can come up with the most unusual birthday present for the other.....it's not about the money, it's about the creativeness. So.....this morning I started another batch of 48 hr. chicken-bone-broth which I'm going to freeze in 1 1/2 pint mason jars, wrap with a pretty scarf......and I just may win this year!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on August 22, 2013, 07:38:53 AM
Jan,

I have been giving the Ikea frother as gifts.  I tie brown string with a knot or small bead at the end on the long stem.  Maybe 10 pieces, 5" long which is knotted around the metal stem.  I cut a small bra shape which I attach with a string to the top of the stem, put in the the two batteries and present the dancing "hula" doll.  Only to WB people who understand the bulletproof coffee concept!    :D

Perhaps give your sister both the broth and the dancing doll to emphasize the benefits of both as she will have a spring in her step and smile on her face because she feels so good!   
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on October 01, 2013, 10:21:45 AM
Here's a story on how a potato chip company came to be ...  I think you'll like the bone broth part of it:


http://www.honestchips.com/jacksons-story
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: deanna in AR on October 01, 2013, 01:39:11 PM
Wow Rita! Did you see on their website that apparently she posted on Twitter that:


http://t.co/zkVIyXZyNu (http://t.co/zkVIyXZyNu)We've got a shot at a commercial during the#SuperBowl (http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23SuperBowl)! Please help us get there by voting. #TeamSmallBiz (http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23TeamSmallBiz)

Wouldn't that be great?? A Super Bowl commercial for potato chips made with potatoes, coconut oil and sea salt? I know they're high carb...but they have no unhealthy fats...that's a BIG step!

EVERYONE GO VOTE!!!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on October 01, 2013, 02:05:02 PM


EVERYONE GO VOTE!!!

Done!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on October 01, 2013, 02:37:46 PM
I didn't see that.  I just  voted.  :)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: scrupulousgirl on October 01, 2013, 03:06:25 PM
 I just Voted. Thank you for sharing this!!

This was on the FAQ Page and gives more information about how the Voting works. I'm assuming until they close the polls you can Vote more than once.

https://www.smallbusinessbiggame.com/faq

How does Small Business Big Game work? Small Business Big Game runs over serveral months. Here’s a rough timeline of how it all goes down:
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on October 02, 2013, 07:19:52 AM
Here's a story on how a potato chip company came to be ...  I think you'll like the bone broth part of it:


http://www.honestchips.com/jacksons-story (http://www.honestchips.com/jacksons-story)


Good story! Couldn't locate the nutritional facts so emailed the company, Megan wrote back very quickly with the following answer http://www.honestchips.com/nutrition


Even though they are about 1 net carb per chip, if I were having a cookout, I would serve them for the carb consumers and I might even munch on a couple myself!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on October 02, 2013, 03:01:29 PM
I tried to find Jackson's Honest Chips at a supermarket listed on the web site.  Couldn't find them, but this is a large chain so my local store may not carry them.  Walking down the snack isle, I saw many new brands of snacks touting peanut oil, lentils, beans, and various other grains besides what was available just 10 months ago when I started WB.  Smaller companies are producing all kinds of flavors with a large variety of ingredients too. 


It probably will be a good idea to have a bag or two available for company during this holiday season.  Last year I still had some crackers in the pantry and was able to use them up ( to the great relief of my family!) although I didn't eat any. 



Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on October 02, 2013, 08:57:02 PM
I found popcorn at Costco made with non GMO corn, coconut oil and sea salt.  Bought it for my family, as it's a better alternative to other stuff. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: deanna in AR on October 03, 2013, 08:18:54 AM
I recently saw Boulder brand potato chips available at Costo on a semi-paleo website...ingredients listed were potatoes, avocado oil & sea salt...once again high carb...but no bad fats...
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Lynda (Fl) on October 04, 2013, 10:36:52 AM
I'm thinking of you, Jan!  I'm making chicken stock today.  I'd like to say it lives up to your bone broth but I doubt it.  I'll be happy just to have some slightly nourishing broth.  Of course, I'm out of bay leaves and peppercorns, oh well.  Wish me luck, I'm not used to doing broth.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on October 04, 2013, 06:44:06 PM
Lynda.....sending good broth vibes in your direction....unfortunately, not all my bone broth made the trip down here so I'm beginning a new batch tomorrow but in a much smaller kitchen...not iideal!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Lynda (Fl) on October 05, 2013, 08:52:54 AM
Thanks, Jan.  All I can say so far is: boy, does this stuff  need salt!  Too bad your bone broth didn't make it, that's a lot of work.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Suzhookem on October 05, 2013, 11:58:01 AM
I've reread these 2 pages and they gave it to DH to read. We are bummed. Made bone broth once and it smelled up the whole house with a horrible odor. Tasted terrible and got thrown away. We put a whole organic chicken in a crock pot (doc suggested) with ACV and sea salt and cooked it 48 hours. Didn't smell great but tasted ok I guess. I know I need to be drinking bone broth but can't seem to get there. Now I'm more confused than ever!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on October 05, 2013, 01:18:20 PM
Suzhookem and Lynda,


I always use lots of spices and veggies in my broth.  For a crock pot size, I use about a tablespoon of whole peppercorns,  4+ stalks of celery, 4 or so carrots/parsnips, a whole cut up onion, turnips, leeks, whole garlic, several bay leaves, etc.  This makes a very flavorful broth that I use as a soup base and for gravies.  I throw the cooked out veggies and bones away, although some people use this for soil enhancement after they grind it up in a blender.  I save salting it for last.

This is like making chicken soup!  After the broth is cooked and strained, I add cut up fresh dill, carrots and parsnips.  Sometimes I add some of the chicken if I've used a whole one for the soup. 

I pour this broth into 1 cup containers and an ice cube tray and freeze it. I don't buy canned or packaged broths anymore.  With cold weather coming, I like a hot soup and use this as a base.

Remember when consomme' used to be served in restaurants?  This is a bone broth cooked with spices and then strained.  Check some web sites for some hints about flavoring and the technique of using egg whites.  I don't do this because I like the extra veggies and now, I am loving adding cream!

By the way, in some Italian style soups like kale -bean, you can add a 3" piece of parmesan rind while the veggies are cooking for added flavor.

Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Lynda (Fl) on October 05, 2013, 02:55:41 PM
Thanks, Jan, for the vibes!  I put three pounds of chicken wings in my crock pot and left it on high for about six hours.  I didn't think I would get any thickening (gel) but, much to my surprise, when we took it out of the frig, it was completely jelly with a skim of fat.  I put a large onion, carrots and celery in, too, for some flavor.  It took a lot of salt and pepper to fix it (and some tamari sauce).  It's mild but not bad.  We are going to put the meat and some spinich in it for a soup. Barbara, I'm filing your ideas for the next batch, your soup sounds great. You are right, Suz, it smelled like burnt feathers. LOL Since I used just the wings, I wonder if I got the best nutrition? I guess it's better than nothing.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on October 05, 2013, 03:36:41 PM
Lynda.....glad it worked out and yes, I do add salt! I drink mine more as a medicinal thing and have gotten used to the lack of flavor....I'm after the nutrients.  We have used a few tablespoons in sauces and I made some egg drop soup with it a few times....and did need to add spices. I started a new batch today using my induction burner and put it in the guest room!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on October 05, 2013, 03:49:11 PM
Suz.....maybe if you think of it as medicine, you could just drink it.....but salt it first!  8)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Suzhookem on October 06, 2013, 10:45:57 AM
You're right Jan. I'll just mark it down to one more disgusting thing to put in my mouth and hold my nose. Getting really discouraged. Went out the other day and wasn't sure I would make it back to the car! Very discouraged. I'm trying to get in with a neuropath to get more help. Need to heal my leaky gut and burned out adrenals. I'm reading and trying, reading and trying. I think I need some help and direction. Oh well, this too shall pass. Happy day everyone!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: deanna in AR on October 06, 2013, 12:23:48 PM
It'll get better Suz...stick in there...saying prayers for you...
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Lynda (Fl) on October 06, 2013, 12:32:38 PM
Hang in there, Suz, we are on your side.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on October 06, 2013, 05:50:33 PM
Suz - I can't stand the taste of it either, until I add lots of other good stuff.  The most important ingredient for me has been homemade tomato puree (though I know some people don't tolerate nightshades well, so far it doesn't seem to be causing me a problem).  I puree the tomatoes using my handheld mixer and then heat it gently on the stove with garlic, basil, and whatever other spices I feel like at the moment before adding it to the broth.  I also add in sauteed vegetables (carrots, zucchini, onion, red pepper), cooked in butter, ghee, or lard.  Once I've made it into a nice soup it's much more yummy.  I might try it one day with just the tomato puree.   
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: bill on October 12, 2013, 12:06:56 PM
Update on bone broth:


I keep seeing the container I put in the
freezer.  Can't get myself to get it out
and continue cooking.


Officially given up.  The bone broth I made
before, tasted and smelled so bad, I
can't bring myself to finish making this.

Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: VibeRadiant on October 15, 2013, 05:40:47 PM
I've read the threads on bone broth, and I have to be honest, the idea kind of grosses me out. I've just started eating fish again after being vegetarian for so long, I can't imagine drinking bone broth.


So I researched gelatin and I decided that I can add gelatin to water or a smoothie that I will be having for breakfast.


Some of the benefits include hair growth, nail growth, skin tightening, joint nourishment, and oddly enough, healing of stomach ulcers. I don't have ulcers but I thought that was an interesting benefit. 
 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on October 15, 2013, 06:18:29 PM
Vibe,


On another thread I listed Bernard Jensen brand gelatin capsules which I take with vitamin c to help tighten my skin after all this weight loss.  Look into Great Lakes brand too.  These are powdered and can be added to smoothies. 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: VibeRadiant on October 15, 2013, 06:28:53 PM
will do, thanks.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: scrupulousgirl on March 05, 2014, 02:41:29 PM
I tried to find Jackson's Honest Chips at a supermarket listed on the web site.  Couldn't find them, but this is a large chain so my local store may not carry them.  Walking down the snack isle, I saw many new brands of snacks touting peanut oil, lentils, beans, and various other grains besides what was available just 10 months ago when I started WB.  Smaller companies are producing all kinds of flavors with a large variety of ingredients too. 


It probably will be a good idea to have a bag or two available for company during this holiday season.  Last year I still had some crackers in the pantry and was able to use them up ( to the great relief of my family!) although I didn't eat any.

Good afternoon!

Just wondering if anyone ever found the Jackson Chips that are made with Coconut oil locally?

http://www.honestchips.com/
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on March 06, 2014, 04:18:27 AM
I haven't found a store that carries 'honest chips' , but at 1 net carb per chip, would probably buy only for guests anyway. It might be interesting if they came out with an anaerobically fermented potato chip cooked in coconut oil....reducing sugar levels and inhibiting the formation of acrylamide and then defining the carb values, which might be significantly less. That's a personal experiment I want to try, using a BG meter but I keep forgetting to buy potatoes!


http://pickl-it.com/blog/783/traditional-potato-preparation-reduces-acrylamide/
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on November 07, 2014, 06:55:59 AM
Looks like New York has it's first take-out bone broth window serving bone broth in coffee cups:


http://wellandgood.com/2014/11/05/why-new-yorkers-will-be-sipping-bone-broth-in-coffee-cups-this-winter/
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on November 07, 2014, 09:59:53 AM
Thanks for posting Rita....I'm forwarding to all my family & friends who think I've gone completely mad when it comes to my bone broth consumption!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on November 07, 2014, 10:20:04 AM
I sure hope this catches on [as I pour 4 cups of my homemade cage free chicken broth into a large pot while making Cream of Chicken soup]!


What a healthy idea! First time I've seen chicken and beef broth combined. Wonder how that tastes?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: HungryinTN on November 07, 2014, 01:02:05 PM
So exciting!  I've been tempted to order some from Bare Bones Broth Company recently with the cold weather approaching.  I still have some bones in my freezer, but they're a little on the old side...
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on November 07, 2014, 02:34:49 PM
Hungry,


You can still simmer them to make a broth.  Don't forget to roast them first!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on January 09, 2015, 03:04:16 PM
According to Carson Daly, bone broth is the new 'hip food' so now all our kids think we're really cool! 8)
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on January 09, 2015, 04:33:11 PM
According to Carson Daly, bone broth is the new 'hip food' so now all our kids think we're really cool! 8)




Finally!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: deanna in AR on January 10, 2015, 08:49:36 AM
I sure hope this catches on [as I pour 4 cups of my homemade cage free chicken broth into a large pot while making Cream of Chicken soup]!


Linda R, I'd love to have your recipe for Cream of Chicken Soup??
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on January 10, 2015, 10:41:03 AM
Here you go..................



CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP   Total carbs – 40.50   1/8 serving = 5.00  1/9 serving = 4.50
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup onion, chopped,  [4.50]
1 tsp organic garlic, minced [1.00]
1 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon xanthan gum
16 ounces organic cauliflower, chopped,  [12.00]
4 cups homemade chicken broth
1 can full fat coconut milk [15.00]
2 cups diced cooked chicken  [cage free]
Cooked, organic,carrots, chopped, 3 ounces  [6.00]
2 tsp Parsley Paste [2.00]
Salt, to taste, about 1-2 teaspoons



In a large soup kettle, sauté the onion and garlic in butter until almost tender. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together the pepper, paprika and xanthan gum. When the vegetables are tender, sprinkle the seasoning mixture over them; mix well. Add the cauliflower and broth. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, on low heat about 20 - 30 minutes or until vegetables are very tender. Use immersion blender to create creamy texture.  Stir in the coconut milk, chicken, carrots and parsley paste. Simmer until soup is heated through. Add salt to taste.
Makes about 6-8 servings
Can be frozen


Stole this recipe from Linda Genaw's site, did some minor tweaking.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: deanna in AR on January 10, 2015, 11:43:10 AM
Thanks Linda R, it sounds delicious.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: littlbit on January 13, 2015, 03:52:29 PM
In the wheat belly book, Dr. Davis says, don't skim off the fat on the broths, but I see many people do.  Sorry, but I am confused.  What is the right approach?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on January 13, 2015, 05:34:31 PM
Whatever tastes good to you!


I do not like to leave the fat in my soup/broth.  I skim it off and freeze it to use when preparing other meals.  The chicken fat is my favorite. Beef is next.
It doesn't go to waste.  The flavor is good and I often add it to ghee or coconut oil in recipes when I saute' or stir fry.
 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: littlbit on January 14, 2015, 06:55:19 AM
Great idea.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Redhead65 on January 24, 2015, 11:20:02 AM
I am making bone broth now. I bought two packets of bones from an organic butcher. The second packet is in the freezer and will be used next weekend. I am using garlic, parsley, carrots, celery, a parsnip, leech, salt, fresh nutmeg an onion and fresh tumeric. I will let it simmer for 4 hours.

Has any of you tried to make broth in the pressure cooker? Is the tast as good as when you let it simmer for a long time?
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on January 24, 2015, 12:13:16 PM
Redhead,


Some people roast the bones prior to making broth.  Also, when you add a TBS. of vinegar, it helps leach out the minerals.   Add any fresh herb like parsley only at the very last half hour of cooking.   I like to simmer the broth.  I think the flavor is much richer than using a pressure cooker.  Plenty of people disagree, but I think the slow simmer lets the flavors concentrate in the liquid.  You often have to add more water the longer you simmer.  Broth can be simmered for several days.  You can cover the pot to catch the condensation and steam. 



Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Redhead65 on January 24, 2015, 12:34:47 PM
I will add a bit of vinegar now. Thanks, Barbara. It is too late to roast the bones now, but I will try to remember it for next time.

I also feel that it is better to simmer the broth for a long time. I may have said "cook", but I meant "simmer". A quick fix (pressure cooker) cannot be the same as the real thing.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on January 24, 2015, 12:41:09 PM
I agree with Barb.
Long, slow simmering.
I prefer to use my Crockpots. Just opened a bag of chicken backs and bony pieces that I purchased from a local producer via the
Iowa Food Coop. I used both of my largest Pots, covered the bones with water, and simmered them for 2 days on Low.
It produced the richest, most colorful chicken broth ever. Really puts Swanson's stuff to shame.


Ended up with 18 cups of broth, now safely stashed away in my smaller freezer.


Almost forgot. Put a TBSP or so of apple cider vinegar in each pot as well.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on January 24, 2015, 01:27:42 PM
Several bone broth forums/blogs recommend simmering bones (both large and medium morrow) below 160 degrees.....the high heat from pressure cooking, even though a faster method, kills off the nutrients (says Sally Fallon and others). Beef bones take a minimum of 72 hours to completely leach, while chicken bones, being less dense, take at least 24 hours.. To my beef bone broth, I add cartilage and hooves (if I can get them!) and to my chicken bone broth I add chicken feet. We don't use pork bones...I remember reading on several sites not to use them, can't remember why. If you're on good terms with your farm butcher, you can have them saw your bones in half, exposing more surface area.....or take them out in your driveway and hammer away.... 8) .


I've experimented using several different methods and what's worked best for me is using my old turkey roaster.....it's the only way I've been able to stay below the 160 temperature. Use a thermometer to adjust settings.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Rita on February 05, 2015, 08:51:19 PM
Quote
Ended up with 18 cups of broth


Wow!  You must have had lots of pots going!
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Linda R on February 06, 2015, 06:59:24 AM
Quote
Ended up with 18 cups of broth


Wow!  You must have had lots of pots going!


Actually just two large Crock Pots, a 6.5 qt and a 5 qt.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Randal on February 14, 2015, 01:03:31 PM
I just found bone broth at Whole Paycheck (while looking for beef broth for my first attempt at beef stew). I'm sure it's not as good as making it from scratch, but I've been meaning to start bone broth for a while.
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Barbara from New Jersey on February 14, 2015, 02:16:52 PM

Randall,

No, not as good as homemade, but much better than not having it.  Some of the organic brands of broth have started supplying stores with their version of bone broth.  If you don't like the flavor, try another brand.  Flavors vary a great deal.


By the way, Whole Pqycheck probably has bones for bone broth near their frozen meat department.  If you are planning to make a broth, save any veggie ends in your freezer.  Add them to the water.  Root veggie scraps are excellent.  You might try freezing the bones, skin and fat from any chicken you eat until you have enough to fill maybe half your largest pot.  Add the water, 1 TSP apple cider or any vinegar and some peppercorns, bring to a boil and turn down to a simmer.  Cover and cook it for 24 hours. 


Large bones from big animals need much longer to cook than small chicken bones.


 
Title: Re: Bone broth?
Post by: Jan in Key West on July 18, 2015, 09:33:10 AM
Bone broth goes mainstream......


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=msUrOxooIEg